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Looking to build my first system

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February 23, 2006 3:23:03 PM

I have a couple of questions:

1. What books/articles should I read?

2. Should I expect to save money building my own system or is it just the fun of doing it?

More about : build system

February 23, 2006 3:53:58 PM

ok dude its so easy now just pick up an issue of max pc or read this article it shows how to build an htpc but its all the same thing mostly or read my instructions.

1.buy computer parts
2.receive and unpack computer parts at home
3. put cpu in socket on mother board
4.put heatsink with on cpu lock it in place with a screw driver
5.install hard driives in case and optical drives
6.install motherboard in case
7.install ram into slots
8.install graphics card
9.install reset and power buttons(look at manual to see which goes where)
10.install power supply and hook up cables
11.close case
12. turn on pc
13.enter bios choose primary boot device as optical drive
14.insert os disc
15.set up partition
16.install os
17. boot into os and install drivers
18.enjoy :D 

its as easy as that
February 24, 2006 2:34:18 AM

Quote:
I have a couple of questions:

1. What books/articles should I read?

2. Should I expect to save money building my own system or is it just the fun of doing it?


Well dvdpiddy answered #1 quite well, but didnt really answer #2, so let me tackle that one.

You will have fun building your own system no doubt, but if you will saving money or not depends on what exactly you wish to build. If you are looking for a budget system, its cheaper to purchase a Dell or like system. Basically this would be anything < $500.

Starting in the midrange building your own starts to become more attractive especially if you already have a valid copy of Windows and Office which to install. The biggest advantage here is you can choose exactly the parts you want and your system is more upgradable. Most likely you will not beat the Dell price, but you will be able to acheive more performance for the same money.

In the high end > $2000 homebuilt will almost always be cheaper. Flagship machines' most expensive part is the brand name printed on the front. The smaller the company the more you pay for this name. Unless you get into Alienware/Falon etc on the ultra high end, in this market, you will 95% of the time get more bang for your buck by building your own. Even having to buy Windows and Office here is not that big of a deal, the higher quality hardware is much cheaper at NewEgg than what Dell would sell it to you for. Flagship machines are the most proftable for a big box seller, and this is build into the price as mentioned.

As pointed out by my good friend Stabface: If you ever intend to overclock build your own system, not only is it exceedingly difficult to overclock a dell machine, it'd render the warranty - dell's strongest point - null and void

If you want a direct comparison kind of give us an idea of what exactly you want to build.

--Duck
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February 24, 2006 12:29:18 PM

> If you want a direct comparison kind of give us an idea
>of what exactly you want to build.

Ok, I would like to build a top flight gaming machine. Looking at these components: AMD dual core, silent cooling and probably wait for AM2 components. I realize the AM2 socket means some delay in getting started, but I wanted to begin my planning now. My biggest concern is getting a top flight AM2 motherboard. I know very little in this area.

Also I am looking at the forthcoming Nvidia 7900 but again don't even know enough to be dangerous. As far as a monitor is concerned I would prefer a wide screen LCD.

I welcome all suggestions and wish to thank everyone in advance.
March 3, 2006 5:22:17 PM

Quote:
> If you want a direct comparison kind of give us an idea
>of what exactly you want to build.

Ok, I would like to build a top flight gaming machine. Looking at these components: AMD dual core, silent cooling and probably wait for AM2 components. I realize the AM2 socket means some delay in getting started, but I wanted to begin my planning now. My biggest concern is getting a top flight AM2 motherboard. I know very little in this area.

Also I am looking at the forthcoming Nvidia 7900 but again don't even know enough to be dangerous. As far as a monitor is concerned I would prefer a wide screen LCD.

I welcome all suggestions and wish to thank everyone in advance.


Ok, lets have a look- sorry for the long delay in the post reply- i have been away on vacation.

As far as AM2 which will be released in June, there is basically nothing on the market right now that supports it (obviously). Asus has always made great motherboards, and for AMD the best chipset seems to be the Nforce Ultra. As for the AM2, there will not be much of a performance increase over the current systems (in fact almost none unless using DDR2-800 memory), so I am not sure waiting for AM2 is going to benefit you much at all. I will post specs for a gaming machine tonight (assuming you dont wait for AM2).

-Duck
March 6, 2006 2:40:52 AM

I promised a gaming system build so here we go:

CPU- Opteron 170- $415.00

RAM-
OCZ Gold GX 2GB (2x 1GB)- $221.98

Motherboard-
Asus A8N-SLI Premium- $164.99

Hard Drive-
WD 250GB SATA 2, 16MB cache- 96.00

DVD Burner-
NEC 16x DVD burner- $39.75

Video Cards-
eVGA 7800GT 256MB $285 x 2

Sound Card (really up to you if you want one)
Creative SB X-FI - $121.99

PSU-
Antec Truepower II 550W- $89.99

Case/KB/Mouse- your choice.. I perfer Antec Cases

LCD-
Dell 24" Widescreen LCD- $799.20 (on sale when this was posted reg price is $999)

Let me know what you think Snowblade.
a b B Homebuilt system
March 6, 2006 1:49:26 PM

Sweet setup!

I'd personally save a little money and get a non-sli mainboard and opt instead for a 1900XT variant...; although two 7800GTs do quite well in SLI, no doubt of that either.....
March 6, 2006 3:01:32 PM

Well this is just the thing I am looking for. Your list gives me a great starting point for tracking down components. I have definitely decided to build my next system.

I agree with your assesment that it is probably of little value in waiting for the AM2 socket, but I am giving serious consideration to waiting a few weeks for the Nvidia 7900. I read an article that claims a 7900GT will be equivalent to a 7800GTX. That would be sweet.
March 6, 2006 3:42:00 PM

To answer question #1, do what I did: Before purchasing, spend several weeks perusing Tom's Hardware forum posts and NewEgg reviews on every item you can conceive of buying. If you're doing it right, you'll probably change your mind about several major components at least a few times.

When you've got a good build list put together, add a post to this forum listing your budget requirements, your intended use for the computer, and then itemize your build "wish list" and ask for comments/recommendations. Check out any alternatives that are recommended to you.

Finally, scour the TG Stores site for the stores with the best prices on your components. NewEgg is usually top-notch, but sometimes you can find better prices at other sites like MWave or TigerDirect. Oh, and if you're itching to get on your build quickly, use FedEx shipping rather than slow-as-molasses UPS.
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