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Best replacement for Outlook Express in Win 7 (64bit)?

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November 6, 2009 12:03:45 AM

Windows Live Mail absolutely blows. I don't want or need to spend $200+ for full Outlook. I hear Thunderbird is a pita and Eudora doesn't like Win7 64bit.

What is everyone using for email now?!

Anyone have success adding an old version of Outlook Express from XP to 7? Googling takes me to all worthless sites talking about beta releases from 6+ months ago (ps... wtf google?!?)
a b $ Windows 7
November 6, 2009 12:20:09 AM

Thunderbird is actually very good.

Click Advanced on your Google search and you can narrow down choices to more recent dates.


November 6, 2009 12:21:55 AM

I'll give Thunderbird a try, but I have yet to see a site that rates it better than 3 stars out of 5 with some pretty bad comments.

Thanks for the google tip, they used to default to more recent stuff.

Any other opinions?
Related resources
November 6, 2009 12:29:27 AM

I frankly don't trust CNET. The user review are mixed, and thats for version 2.x.x.x. I don't see any relating to Windows 7 64 bit, which is supposedly version 3.x.x.x and its not out of beta yet. I cannot use alpha/beta/rc software under any circumstances.
a b $ Windows 7
November 6, 2009 12:40:01 AM

You can run 2.0.0.23 in 64 bit Win 7...I am.

You can run most any 32 bit software in a 64 bit OS.
November 7, 2009 4:51:37 AM

Honestly who uses Outlook Express...HONESTLY???
November 7, 2009 2:45:16 PM

fatsauce said:
Honestly who uses Outlook Express...HONESTLY???


Lots and lots of people do. Its great for business people. I'm not talking about college kids or tech junkies, just regular people who don't want to deal with the hassle of finding, tweaking, setting up, incompatibilities, tech support, learning something new, etc. Lots and lots of people use it.
a b $ Windows 7
November 7, 2009 3:59:51 PM

No tweaking required for Thunderbird either. Unless you want to and then you have the option for it. Plus add ons just like FF does (though they've been pretty limited until Thunderbird 3).

Why do you assume Thunderbird requires any more tech knowledge than Outlook?
November 7, 2009 4:05:15 PM

TheViper said:
No tweaking required for Thunderbird either. Unless you want to and then you have the option for it. Plus add ons just like FF does (though they've been pretty limited until Thunderbird 3).

Why do you assume Thunderbird requires any more tech knowledge than Outlook?


If you were to go into any office and pick any computer where the user has been using OE and install Thunderbird. I can guarantee you that there would be many calls to tech support. Not because it is any more difficult. Because it is different. The vast majority of people who use computers have Microsoft-centric computer knowledge, not general computer knowledge. If you change one simple menu heading from Tools to Options, you will baffle alot of people. I deal with it every day.
a b $ Windows 7
November 7, 2009 4:09:43 PM

Yeah, I understand that but the question is about an Outlook replacement, not an Outlook clone.
November 7, 2009 5:46:07 PM

TheViper said:
Yeah, I understand that but the question is about an Outlook replacement, not an Outlook clone.


Fair enough. I actually would rather have a way to get actual OE into win7. Thats the ideal solution, but I don't think its possible, hence, replacement that is as close to clone as possible. :) 
a b $ Windows 7
November 7, 2009 6:08:24 PM

Aside from the paid version of Outlook itself, I don't know anything that replicates Outlook as it si.

Thunderbird 3 is supposed to incorporate a lot of Outlook like features with calendars, scheduling plus new stuff like tabbed emails, easier account set up, activity manger (tracks deletions, moves, etc...), smart folders (multiple accounts aggregate to one folder), and better Windows integration.

It's a tough spot to be in. You have to bite one bullet or the other. Either pay for Outlook for everyone or have everyone learn a new e-mail client.
November 7, 2009 6:14:06 PM

Foxmail. simple, free and portable.

Best solution

a c 209 $ Windows 7
November 7, 2009 7:09:54 PM
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I've used Outlook Express on my home system for many years and it worked just fine for me. The lack of it in Windows 7 annoyed me because it meant I had to spend time researching and testing alternatives.

I settled on Thunderbird. I'm currently running 2.0.0.23 on 64-bit Win7 RC Build 7100. It works perfectly well for me - I have multiple e-mail accounts which I'm able to access through one Thunderbird profile. Thunderbird gives you a choice as to whether you want to receive mail from each account into separate inboxes or into a common inbox (I use the latter). It's able to do everything that I did under Outlook Express and the learning curve was very minor.

The most difficult part was migrating my mailboxes full of existing e-mails (some going back over a decade), and that's because many of mine are hierarchically organized. The hierarchy was not preserved and so I had to manually move folders around in order to reproduce the same organization I had in OE. Once that was done, though, it was smooth sailing.
November 7, 2009 10:38:29 PM

foxmail...
a b $ Windows 7
November 8, 2009 3:57:51 AM

core i7 ownage said:
Hotmail?

That still exists?
a b $ Windows 7
November 9, 2009 4:04:03 PM

Windows Live Mail is the closest thing you're going to get that:

1) Is free.
2) Looks similar to Outlook Express.

It's pretty much the same program with a little more flash. The one thing I didn't care for with OE is that it chokes on large mailbox files... I had one person that had an Inbox file exceeding 1GB... once I switched her to Thunderbird (no Windows Live Mail at the time), her mail worked fine. I'm not sure if the Windows Mail client in Vista is any better, because I really haven't used it much. I started using Windows Live Mail as soon as it was available and I use Outlook at work.
November 14, 2009 3:58:33 PM

I did a a clean install of Win7 Pro 64bit. I then installed Thunderbird on it. I wanted to move my XP Outlook Express message system over to Thunderbird on Win7. I want to move the accounts, contact list and all existing message over. When I tell Thunderbird that I want to import into the system, it offers a blank screen. How do I tell it OE? What files do I copy over to the new PC so that Thunderbird sees the OE files and imports all the account, contacts and messages? I installed Thunderbird on my XP machine and it allows me to import everything so I assume that it is looks for the OE files and finds them. I had thought that I would just import into Thunderbird and then export the system and copy that on the Win7 system. However, I don't see an "export" option of any kind in Thunderbird. How did you move the system over to Win7?
a c 209 $ Windows 7
November 14, 2009 4:24:15 PM

If you've got Thunderbird installed on the same system as Outlook Express, you should be able to import using the instructions on this page: http://support.real-time.com/tbird/oe_import.html

In my case, I installed Thunderbird on my Win7 system, so I needed a different way to get the files from Outlook Express on my old XP system. I referred to this page: http://kb.mozillazine.org/Import_from_Outlook_Express, and used DbxConv and the ImportExportTools extension.

If you want to move stuff from Thunderbird on one system to Thunderbird on another system, MozBackup is probably the easiest way: http://mozbackup.jasnapaka.com/
November 14, 2009 6:07:38 PM

Sorry, I didn't mean to confuse you. I have exactly the same situation as you. New Win7 system with Thunderbird and my XP OE mail on my old machine.

I did install Thunderbird on my XP system, import OE into it. I was thinking that I could just Export the whole system to from XP Thunderbird into Win7 Thunderbird. I didn't see how this would work because I didn't see an Export option in Thunderbird, only an import option.

However, I think you provided the links I need to solve the problem either way. I thought that I did a good Google search and Mozilla site search. I guess I just didn't put it all together!

Thanks again.
a c 209 $ Windows 7
November 14, 2009 7:16:32 PM

If you've got everything you want in the Thunderbird profile on your XP system, then MozBackup will probably be the easiest way to move it over to your Win7 system. Just run in on the XP system to back everything up, copy the backup to your Win7 system, then run in on the Win7 system to restore it.
December 6, 2009 7:25:01 PM

sminlal said:
If you've got everything you want in the Thunderbird profile on your XP system, then MozBackup will probably be the easiest way to move it over to your Win7 system. Just run in on the XP system to back everything up, copy the backup to your Win7 system, then run in on the Win7 system to restore it.




Nice going sminlal,

Two days ago, I installed Thunderbird on my XP machine. I want to test and
become familiar with Thunderbird, before installing it on my Win 7 laptop. I have
been wondering, however, how to import my emails to the laptop, following the
Thunderbird installation. I want to avoid having to reopen once again all the emails
in all my folders, as I am currently having to do with the XP machine installation.

wanjisunka
a b $ Windows 7
December 6, 2009 7:26:49 PM

Right click the folder and select "Mark Folder Read".
December 9, 2009 5:27:17 PM

sminlal said:
I've used Outlook Express on my home system for many years and it worked just fine for me. The lack of it in Windows 7 annoyed me because it meant I had to spend time researching and testing alternatives.

I settled on Thunderbird. I'm currently running 2.0.0.23 on 64-bit Win7 RC Build 7100. It works perfectly well for me - I have multiple e-mail accounts which I'm able to access through one Thunderbird profile. Thunderbird gives you a choice as to whether you want to receive mail from each account into separate inboxes or into a common inbox (I use the latter). It's able to do everything that I did under Outlook Express and the learning curve was very minor.

The most difficult part was migrating my mailboxes full of existing e-mails (some going back over a decade), and that's because many of mine are hierarchically organized. The hierarchy was not preserved and so I had to manually move folders around in order to reproduce the same organization I had in OE. Once that was done, though, it was smooth sailing.



I have downloaded Thunderbird and it is OK on System 7, 64 bit. Outlook Express features I use all the time are not in this program: Ability to view/edit email code, multiple signatures usable with any/all email accounts, and the ability to view/block the spammers email address or entire offending web site. Also, I send a lot of .gifs and like to view them when creating the email. So far I have NOT found any email programs that will allow me to send email the way Outlook Express has in the past. I can edit in my HTML program and view in a browser, but can't past the code into Thunderbird's email. Having to use these extra steps to create an email is a ROYAL PAIN !!! I send/run a joke eDispatch which is sent in HTML and the new System 7 has been real let down for me. I also maintain a web site with a lot of visitor interaction that using Outlook Express was a perfect tool. Is there something I have missed in Thunderbird? Any advice would be greatly appreciated.... I have Outlook 2007, but can't view .gifs in it either while creating emails. Just another one of Microsoft's brilliant ideas....



a c 209 $ Windows 7
December 10, 2009 3:58:08 AM

@BlueThunder:

> Ability to view/edit email code
I run Thunderbird with preview turned off because I don't like it rendering e-mails until I've decided if I really want to see them. So I have a "folders" pane on the left side and a list of the folder contents on the right side. If I click on one of the right-side content items to selected it, I can view the mail source by using the "View -> Message Source" menu selection.

> multiple signatures usable with any/all email accounts
If you use "Tools -> Account Settings", you can set a signature file for each account by clicking on the account name in the left pane (on the line with the little "+" or "-" sign beside it) and using the "Attach this signature" checkbox and selection button. You can set multiple accounts to use the same signature file if you want.

> the ability to view/block the spammers email address or entire offending web site.
It's not a feature I use, but you can set up rules to direct or discard mail using "Tools -> Message Filters".

> I send a lot of .gifs and like to view them when creating the email.
When I drag a .gif or other image file onto a mail compose window, it shows the picture inline in the window. I'm not sure why it wouldn't do that for you...

> I can edit in my HTML program and view in a browser, but can't past the code into Thunderbird's email.
Is there some reason you can't use Thunderbird's built-in HTML editor?
a b $ Windows 7
December 10, 2009 5:29:31 PM

BlueThunder said:
I have downloaded Thunderbird and it is OK on System 7, 64 bit. Outlook Express features I use all the time are not in this program: Ability to view/edit email code, multiple signatures usable with any/all email accounts, and the ability to view/block the spammers email address or entire offending web site. Also, I send a lot of .gifs and like to view them when creating the email. So far I have NOT found any email programs that will allow me to send email the way Outlook Express has in the past. I can edit in my HTML program and view in a browser, but can't past the code into Thunderbird's email. Having to use these extra steps to create an email is a ROYAL PAIN !!! I send/run a joke eDispatch which is sent in HTML and the new System 7 has been real let down for me. I also maintain a web site with a lot of visitor interaction that using Outlook Express was a perfect tool. Is there something I have missed in Thunderbird? Any advice would be greatly appreciated.... I have Outlook 2007, but can't view .gifs in it either while creating emails. Just another one of Microsoft's brilliant ideas....


You should try Windows Live Mail... it is essentially an up-to-date version of Outlook Express.
December 10, 2009 7:31:39 PM

Zoron said:
You should try Windows Live Mail... it is essentially an up-to-date version of Outlook Express.


I'm using wLive Mail right now. It also does not do everything Outlook Express did. I use to embed a lot of video codes via the source code screen in Outlook Express. Thunderbird does not accept/display these codes from their HTML window. I haven't found any tabs/keys to edit email code in wLive either. Again, dancing .gifs do not display when composing or reading email in these programs. You can add different signatures, but when composing, only the default signature will be available to insert. I normality use over 30 signatures to avoid having to retype the same info over and over. Please tell me I have over looked something in either of these programs???? Any suggestions would also be appreciated.

Thanks for everyones input!
BT
a b $ Windows 7
December 10, 2009 8:58:03 PM

Thunderbird 3 RC2
http://www.mozillamessaging.com/en-US/thunderbird/early...

That will definitely give you all you're looking for. Especially regarding HTML as it uses the same rendering engine as FF 3.5 does.

But being a Release Candidate means it's not totally ready for the consumer market but is the last step before public release. Use it at your own risk but it is highly likely that this and the final release code will be almost exactly the same.
December 10, 2009 9:48:35 PM

TheViper said:
Thunderbird 3 RC2
http://www.mozillamessaging.com/en-US/thunderbird/early...

That will definitely give you all you're looking for. Especially regarding HTML as it uses the same rendering engine as FF 3.5 does.

But being a Release Candidate means it's not totally ready for the consumer market but is the last step before public release. Use it at your own risk but it is highly likely that this and the final release code will be almost exactly the same.



Thanks for the link, I'll give it a try right now!
BT
Anonymous
a b $ Windows 7
January 16, 2010 12:36:17 AM

I use eMclient...
February 7, 2010 12:24:38 PM

fatsauce said:
Honestly who uses Outlook Express...HONESTLY???


I do, and as soon as I find something that approaches OE for Win 7, I am going to get it. I very stupidly installed Mail Live and was unable to get all my old stuff from Vista onto the new email program. Now, I am looking for an OE replacedment not written by Microsoft. They have developed a terrible ability to put some real junk in their software, ie, Vista and now Mail Live.

John
a b $ Windows 7
February 9, 2010 8:24:20 PM

There should be no issue to import mail from OE into Windows Live Mail... as long as you know where OE and Windows Mail / Live Mail stores it's data. Besides, if you used Vista, you didn't have Outlook Express... you had Windows Mail. Windows Mail is actually more similar to Windows Live Mail than Outlook Express.
February 11, 2010 1:15:46 PM

I just bought a new computer and found out it DOESN"t have outlook on it! After reading posts about thunderbird it says it doesn't recognize 'pop' accounts which is what I have. And you cannot put any outlook on this new versions of windows 7......really stinks. Any suggestions?
a b $ Windows 7
February 11, 2010 1:42:41 PM

Yes, download Windows Live Essentials and install Windows Live Mail... that is MS's updated version of Outlook Express. (Which is different than Outlook, btw... Outlook installs quite easily if you have MS Office).
February 11, 2010 1:58:57 PM

I just called best buy where bought the new computer. They said they can install outlook express but I would have to buy it. People here keep saying windows live stinks and I so want my outlook back. If I get ms office which my husband has will outlook be on it and will it install properly on windows 7? So for all the questions.....also again thunderbird doesn't recognize 'pop' accounts?
a b $ Windows 7
February 12, 2010 3:49:00 AM

I used Thunderbird for POP3 accounts... so I'm not sure where you heard that info. There's nothing wrong with Windows Live Mail... and it does handle larger file sizes better than Outlook Express. It's all a matter of personal preference. If you purchase Office, Outlook will be included but not Outlook Express. My suggestion is to try Windows Live Mail to see if you like it (after all, it's free) and same with Thunderbird. If it turns out that Thunderbird can't be configured for POP3 (something which I really can't see happening), then again you really haven't lost anything. If you purchase Office just to get Outlook, then it's a waste of money.
February 12, 2010 9:45:43 PM

Zoron

I am quiet 'stupid' when it comes to stuff like this. office 2007 has 'outlook' but not outlook express..............differance?l
a b $ Windows 7
February 13, 2010 12:07:02 AM

Outlook is a full-featured email client, calendar etc. Outlook Express is a stripped-down free version of Outlook. Outlook is aimed more at business users and Outlook Express is aimed at the home user.
February 13, 2010 12:23:42 PM

Zoron
My problem and please correct me is I have a roadrunner email account.........time warner cable. How do I make the windows live mail my roadrunner account like it was with outlook express? I am really ready to just return this computer to best buy and get one with Xp on it
a b $ Windows 7
February 14, 2010 2:39:56 AM

If you press 'Alt', you'll see the top menus you're used to in OE pop up. It's just a simple matter of going into the Accounts option just like you would in OE.
February 16, 2010 7:46:13 PM

jlingrel said:
I do, and as soon as I find something that approaches OE for Win 7, I am going to get it. I very stupidly installed Mail Live and was unable to get all my old stuff from Vista onto the new email program. Now, I am looking for an OE replacedment not written by Microsoft. They have developed a terrible ability to put some real junk in their software, ie, Vista and now Mail Live.

John




I agree, Windows Live is really frustrating, to put it mildly, and I never used Vista, having stuck to XP. So, when I installed Windows 7, I got the Ultimate version, one of the reasons was so I could use XP Mode. Avoid THAT like the plague, because it only operates in 16 bit and the cure, a BIOS upgrade, crashed my new pc. At least I could use Outlook Express there, for a while, anyway. after reinstalling Windows 7, I had no choice but to go to to Windows Live, but I hate it like the plague, the extra steps required are a pain. Not too many complaints about Windows 7, other than XP Mode, but Microsoft really stuffed up by taking Outlook Express away from us.

But thanks to the threads you've all posted, I'll now go back to Thunderbird, which I've used in the past. Thunderbirds are go!!
February 16, 2010 7:56:53 PM

Further to my comment, here's a review I just saw. (Yeah, there's 2 sides to most coins ... :/  This is from http://www.brighthub.com/computing/windows-platform/art...

The Bottom-line

Of course, the choice of browser, e-mail client, text-editor and similar things always varies from one individual to the other, and the same thing is applicable in case of the Thunderbird vs. Windows Live Mail scenario, too. But, as far as inconsistencies are concerned, there are a whole lot of them in Windows Live Mail, while the count is pretty low in case of Thunderbird. However, most existing WLM users have been continuing with it for a long while rather than shifting to Thunderbird (some are hardcore MS fans, but things may change in the future).
a b $ Windows 7
February 17, 2010 4:43:27 AM

"Extra steps"? What exactly do you mean? Having migrated to Windows Live Mail quite some time ago, I'm curious to know what extra steps you noticed that I missed. To me, WLM works as seemlessly as OE did... and it handles large mailbox files much better than OE.
February 18, 2010 3:11:18 AM

I also am looking for a Outlook Express type e-mail client. I want a program which gives the option of applying a password to access the program, as Outlook Express. I'm not talking about the password to acces the mail server. I have the full version of Outlook, but it is just way more than I need and I don't care for the way it stores it's data.
I do not want to use Thunderbird, I've used it and don't care for it. Windows Live Mial would be ok if one could use it with a password but it doesn't. Nor do I want to have to create another user account to lock my mail. I just want something as close to Outlook Exprejpss as possible. It's simple to use, pretty straight forward in how it stores it's data, and I can password protect it on my computer. I've looked on other forums and every gives all this crap about 'the password can be broken anyway, etc. I KNOW that.
a b $ Windows 7
February 18, 2010 4:34:43 AM

Sorry; Windows Live Mail will not accomplish what you want:

Quote:
About installing Windows Live Mail
If you have Microsoft Outlook Express 6, Windows Mail, or Windows Live Mail desktop beta installed on your computer, when you install Windows Live Mail, all of your existing accounts, settings, and e-mail messages are automatically imported into Windows Live Mail. Any contacts in your Microsoft Windows contact list (A list of contacts that contains the names, addresses, phone numbers, and e-mail addresses of each of your contacts. If you're signed in with a Windows Live ID, Mail uses the contact list associated with your Windows Live ID.) , and any Windows Calendar events (A scheduled activity that you enter into a calendar, such as a meeting, party, or appointment.) are also imported when you install Windows Live Mail.

You can't create Microsoft Outlook Express e-mail identities (A method used in Outlook Express that allows multiple people sharing the same computer to keep their e-mail separate. Identities aren't used in Mail.) in Mail. Instead, to protect each user's e-mail with a password, create a separate Windows user account and password for each person who wants to use Mail on the computer. If you install Windows Live Mail and previously had an Outlook Express account that contains multiple e-mail identities, you can import the e-mail messages and account information from the identities by clicking Identities on the Windows Live Mail File menu.


If you want your email protected by a password, you MUST protect individual user accounts with passwords. You're referring to "Identities" which aren't supported with Windows Live Mail. Outlook is the best fit for what you want and since you already have it, why not use it?

If you're absolutely dead set against using either of those email clients, I found this page which lists the top 12 free email clients. You'll have to check out each of those to see if they have the features you want.
February 21, 2010 12:29:36 AM

I don't want to set up different accounts just to protect my mail. I am usually the only one to use my comptuer, but on occassion there are other people who use it, though not on a regular basis. I have nothing on my computer which I either can't password protect I or care that other's can view and use. I just want a simple e-mail client that I can protect access to my mail. I wouldn't mind windows mail if it could be password protected as Outlook express was able to do. The full version of Outlook is just much more than I need in addition to I don't care for how the full verision of Outlook stores it's files. Outlook express file storage was simple, easy to backup and easy to copy & then access from one computer to another and I could set up different accounts without being forced for each account to migrate into one. I DON'T want to access all my accounts from just one account. And as long as it was password protected, even then if someone else knew how to copy the mail storage folders, they still couldn't access the account without the password.
a b $ Windows 7
February 21, 2010 1:38:24 AM

Nothing complicated about how Outlook stores data... it's just different from OE. The easiest option is to export the data to .pst files in to a location that's easy to find, then you can easily import from those .pst files.

I linked you to a page that lists 12 different email clients. It's up to you to investigate each one to see if it has the features you want. I know OE did everything you wanted the way you wanted it... but like every piece of software, it eventually goes bye bye. OE has been around since the Win 98 days... I'm actually surprised it lasted this long.

You are definately in the minority. Most people complain about OE on these forums and suggest everyone switch to Thunderbird. I didn't mind OE... I liked it... but I also like WLM. Unfortunately, it doesn't do what you want and you turn your nose up at any of the alternatives people usually suggest. I haven't looked at any of the others because I haven't felt the need to... so I can't tell you if they will do what you need them to do. You'll have to look at each one and decide. No, they're not OE, but you're not going to get OE on anything other than XP. So your choices are clear: you can find an alternative to OE that does what you want, or you can stick with Windows XP.
March 1, 2010 12:08:12 PM

OK, I'm going nuts. I have my Outlook Express emails in their original folder from my old XP computer on an external storage device, and I installed Thunderbird (don't know which version, but I don't think it was the beta) on the old XP computer and imported my OE emails into it, so I have them in a .default folder on the external device as well. I'm trying to set up Thunderbird (I'm open to which version) on my new Windows 7 64-bit system, and am having difficulty.

I thought I could simply move the .default file to the appropriate directory once I installed Thunderbird, but the installation didn't produce the same directory hierarchy on Windows 7 as it did on XP!

Then I tried importing the OE files into Thunderbird, and it messed up email the folder arrangement previously established in OE. What's the best way for me to get my emails up and running on my new system??? Thanks!
!