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The yellow line

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May 11, 2005 9:19:42 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

I've noticed at airports the airline pilots always taxi the aircraft with
the front wheel right on the paint of the yellow taxi line... never an inch
to the right or left... right down the line.

I just wonder if this is a matter of "pilot pride" or is it actually an
official procedure of some kind?


Dallas

More about : yellow line

Anonymous
May 11, 2005 9:19:43 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

"Dallas" <Cybnorm@spam_me_not.Hotmail.Com> wrote in message
news:o Bgge.850$OU1.697@newsread3.news.pas.earthlink.net...
> I've noticed at airports the airline pilots always taxi the aircraft with
> the front wheel right on the paint of the yellow taxi line... never an
> inch
> to the right or left... right down the line.
>
> I just wonder if this is a matter of "pilot pride" or is it actually an
> official procedure of some kind?
>
>
> Dallas
>
>

Keeping it right in the middle of the taxiway assures you have a known
clearance factor on either side. If you're right on the stripe and so is
the other guy/gal, then you know your wingtips will miss each other.

This is especially critical at airports where there are pronounced "alleys"
that planes use to get to and from the gates. Terminal 4 at Phoenix is a
good example as are Atlanta and Denver too. I always cringe when taxiing in
or out at Phoenix as I'm certain two A319s are gonna rip each others
winglets off...but they miss.

Jay Beckman
PP-ASEL / Sim Pilot Too
Chandler, AZ
May 11, 2005 9:35:26 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

Dallas wrote:
> I've noticed at airports the airline pilots always taxi the aircraft with
> the front wheel right on the paint of the yellow taxi line... never an inch
> to the right or left... right down the line.
>
> I just wonder if this is a matter of "pilot pride" or is it actually an
> official procedure of some kind?
>
>
> Dallas
>
>

No, usually those pricks are the ass-kissers and climb the ladder quite
fast. Damn a-kissers!!

--

boB,
Master_Caution_70

U.S. Army Aviation (retired)
Central Texas - 5NM West of Gray Army Airfield (KGRK)
Related resources
May 11, 2005 11:21:50 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

"boB"
> No, usually those pricks are the ass-kissers and climb the ladder quite
> fast. Damn a-kissers!!

Come on boB... tell us what you *really* think. :-)


Dallas
May 11, 2005 12:38:34 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

Unlike Los Angeles drivers, there ARE some people who care about traffic
control markings. This kind of discipline by pilots to follow the yellow
line no doubt helps them achieve the 'best driver/low insurance' award for
their cars.
Geez, look what following a yellow line did for Dorothy...helped her find
the Wizard of Oz : )

Arthur

"Jay Beckman" <jnsbeckman@cox.net> wrote in message
news:p _gge.7956$Fa1.5600@fed1read02...
> "Dallas" <Cybnorm@spam_me_not.Hotmail.Com> wrote in message
> news:o Bgge.850$OU1.697@newsread3.news.pas.earthlink.net...
>> I've noticed at airports the airline pilots always taxi the aircraft with
>> the front wheel right on the paint of the yellow taxi line... never an
>> inch
>> to the right or left... right down the line.
>>
>> I just wonder if this is a matter of "pilot pride" or is it actually an
>> official procedure of some kind?
>>
>>
>> Dallas
>>
>>
>
> Keeping it right in the middle of the taxiway assures you have a known
> clearance factor on either side. If you're right on the stripe and so is
> the other guy/gal, then you know your wingtips will miss each other.
>
> This is especially critical at airports where there are pronounced
> "alleys" that planes use to get to and from the gates. Terminal 4 at
> Phoenix is a good example as are Atlanta and Denver too. I always cringe
> when taxiing in or out at Phoenix as I'm certain two A319s are gonna rip
> each others winglets off...but they miss.
>
> Jay Beckman
> PP-ASEL / Sim Pilot Too
> Chandler, AZ
>
Anonymous
May 11, 2005 1:25:09 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

On Wed, 11 May 2005 05:35:26 GMT, boB <akitaREMOVECAPS77@excite.Icom>
wrote:

>Dallas wrote:
>> I've noticed at airports the airline pilots always taxi the aircraft with
>> the front wheel right on the paint of the yellow taxi line... never an inch
>> to the right or left... right down the line.
>>
>> I just wonder if this is a matter of "pilot pride" or is it actually an
>> official procedure of some kind?
>>
>>
>> Dallas
>>
>>
>
>No, usually those pricks are the ass-kissers and climb the ladder quite
>fast. Damn a-kissers!!

So you had trouble following the yellow line?

Bob
Anonymous
May 11, 2005 3:15:35 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

John wrote:

> In the game I see planes taxied several more feet past this point, so

> that the "T" is under the two mains instead and the nose is farther
up.
>
> Which is it?

In the sim, it is most likely either inaccurate scenery, improper gate
parking placement, or incorrect aircraft at that particular gate that
is causing the nosewheel of the aircraft to be past this line.

--
Peter
Anonymous
May 11, 2005 8:04:27 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

BTW, will the new A380 require wider alleys? Complete redesign of every
airport in the world?


"Arthur" <alspectorz@rogers.com> wrote in message
news:4I2dnXpuJ_S_YBzfRVn-sQ@rogers.com...
> Unlike Los Angeles drivers, there ARE some people who care about traffic
> control markings. This kind of discipline by pilots to follow the yellow
> line no doubt helps them achieve the 'best driver/low insurance' award for
> their cars.
> Geez, look what following a yellow line did for Dorothy...helped her find
> the Wizard of Oz : )
>
> Arthur
>
> "Jay Beckman" <jnsbeckman@cox.net> wrote in message
> news:p _gge.7956$Fa1.5600@fed1read02...
> > "Dallas" <Cybnorm@spam_me_not.Hotmail.Com> wrote in message
> > news:o Bgge.850$OU1.697@newsread3.news.pas.earthlink.net...
> >> I've noticed at airports the airline pilots always taxi the aircraft
with
> >> the front wheel right on the paint of the yellow taxi line... never an
> >> inch
> >> to the right or left... right down the line.
> >>
> >> I just wonder if this is a matter of "pilot pride" or is it actually an
> >> official procedure of some kind?
> >>
> >>
> >> Dallas
> >>
> >>
> >
> > Keeping it right in the middle of the taxiway assures you have a known
> > clearance factor on either side. If you're right on the stripe and so
is
> > the other guy/gal, then you know your wingtips will miss each other.
> >
> > This is especially critical at airports where there are pronounced
> > "alleys" that planes use to get to and from the gates. Terminal 4 at
> > Phoenix is a good example as are Atlanta and Denver too. I always
cringe
> > when taxiing in or out at Phoenix as I'm certain two A319s are gonna rip
> > each others winglets off...but they miss.
> >
> > Jay Beckman
> > PP-ASEL / Sim Pilot Too
> > Chandler, AZ
> >
>
>
May 11, 2005 8:07:25 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

On Wed, 11 May 2005 16:04:27 +0200, "nn" <nn@statoil.com> wrote:

>BTW, will the new A380 require wider alleys? Complete redesign of every
>airport in the world?
>
Probably not...as they'll be banned from most US airports...they'll
think of some excuse ala concorde (i.e. not made by USA we won't use
or allow it).

Mark B

**Remove spam alternative to mail***
May 11, 2005 8:29:39 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

In some cases on FS9, I pull the nosewheels up to the T and half my tail is
still sticking out onto the taxiway. So, I pull it in as tight as as can to
get out of the way of taxiing aircraft and forget about the T. I know this
isn't realistic, but until they program several T's for different a/c, it's
one of those desperate measures us simmers are forced to take.

Arthur

"pr" <proffice@twcny.rr.com> wrote in message
news:1115835335.540407.98480@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
> John wrote:
>
>> In the game I see planes taxied several more feet past this point, so
>
>> that the "T" is under the two mains instead and the nose is farther
> up.
>>
>> Which is it?
>
> In the sim, it is most likely either inaccurate scenery, improper gate
> parking placement, or incorrect aircraft at that particular gate that
> is causing the nosewheel of the aircraft to be past this line.
>
> --
> Peter
>
Anonymous
May 11, 2005 8:36:02 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

"nn" <nn@statoil.com> wrote in message
news:o hoge.9436$ai7.228636@news2.e.nsc.no...
> BTW, will the new A380 require wider alleys? Complete redesign of every
> airport in the world?
>

From the British Airports Authority website:

The Airbus A380 will be the first NGLA to arrive at Heathrow, due in Spring
2006. Carrying 555 passengers on two decks, it will be the world's largest
ever commercial aircraft. Its 80 metre wing-span is 15 metres wider than
that of the Boeing 747-400.

To cater for the increase in wing-span the taxiways need to be widened
slightly with an increased separation between them and the southern runway.
The outer and inner taxiways will therefore be repositioned 10 and 30 metres
to the north respectively. This will involve removing 28,000 cubic metres of
existing paving, all of which will be recycled back into the Terminal 5
construction project.

The larger aircraft brings the challenges to Heathrow of providing bigger
parking stands and stronger, wider pavement areas. The density of passenger
flow will also increase which means that bigger check-in areas, gaterooms
and reclaim areas are required. To prepare for this, BAA Heathrow is
investing a total of nearly £400 million on modifications to airfield and
terminal infrastructure over the next five years

Chris
May 11, 2005 8:53:59 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

On Wed, 11 May 2005 16:29:39 -0400, "Arthur" <alspectorz@rogers.com>
brought the following to our attention:

>In some cases on FS9, I pull the nosewheels up to the T and half my tail is
>still sticking out onto the taxiway. So, I pull it in as tight as as can to
>get out of the way of taxiing aircraft and forget about the T. I know this
>isn't realistic, but until they program several T's for different a/c, it's
>one of those desperate measures us simmers are forced to take.
>
>Arthur

you have gates? I don't have any gates.. many times no terminal
either. Must get FSSE enabled aGaiN. Mostly just land, pull off the
runway, check the fuel, the time, a few other things.. then CTRL+C.

-G
Anonymous
May 11, 2005 9:38:54 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

I have a related question.

At airports I've been to, the pilot brings the plane's nosewheel right
up to the end of the line, where the little crossline forms a little "T."

In the game I see planes taxied several more feet past this point, so
that the "T" is under the two mains instead and the nose is farther up.

Which is it?



John

--
To reply, remove "die.spammers" from address


Von Herzen, moge es wieder zu Herzen gehen. --Beethoven
Anonymous
May 11, 2005 9:38:55 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

"The Lindbergh Baby" <johngrabowski1@die.spammersearthlink.net> wrote in
message news:4282432F.1020409@die.spammersearthlink.net...
>I have a related question.
>
> At airports I've been to, the pilot brings the plane's nosewheel right up
> to the end of the line, where the little crossline forms a little "T."
>
> In the game I see planes taxied several more feet past this point, so that
> the "T" is under the two mains instead and the nose is farther up.
>
> Which is it?
>
>
>
> John


IRL, often the lead in line to the gate will have several cross lines to
allow for proper positioning of several different types of aircraft.

A 737 will need to pull in deeper than say an A319. You might also have two
different lines for a 757 depending on if they want to use the first door on
the left side or the second.

In general, it is the nose wheels that should be parked on the cross and not
the mains.

Jay B
May 11, 2005 9:47:07 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

I've been told if you follow the yellow line and you hit something then you
wont be in trouble, I would imagine it would at least lower the odds

"Dallas" <Cybnorm@spam_me_not.Hotmail.Com> wrote in message
news:o Bgge.850$OU1.697@newsread3.news.pas.earthlink.net...
> I've noticed at airports the airline pilots always taxi the aircraft with
> the front wheel right on the paint of the yellow taxi line... never an
> inch
> to the right or left... right down the line.
>
> I just wonder if this is a matter of "pilot pride" or is it actually an
> official procedure of some kind?
>
>
> Dallas
>
>
May 12, 2005 1:20:47 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

Dallas wrote:

> "boB"
>
>>No, usually those pricks are the ass-kissers and climb the ladder quite
>>fast. Damn a-kissers!!
>
>
> Come on boB... tell us what you *really* think. :-)
>
>
> Dallas
>
>

:)  Actually I was taught much differently and because of that I
usually never had my nose wheel on the line. In a helicopter you hover
taxi with the yellow line directly under your butt. With the chin
bubble you can see the line down there, you know, between your legs.
Luckily most towers just wanted to get rid of swing-wings and most times
ask the pilot if they can accept a present position (**insert your
cardinal direction here**) departure which the pilot was thankful to
accept to get the heck outa Dodge.

--

boB,
Master_Caution_70

U.S. Army Aviation (retired)
Central Texas - 5NM West of Gray Army Airfield (KGRK)
May 12, 2005 10:20:10 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

"Arthur"
> Geez, look what following a yellow line did for Dorothy...helped her find
> the Wizard of Oz : )

Lotta good it did her!~ Sent back to Kansas to some ugly assed old farm
where she spent the rest of her days working from 6 am to 9 pm shoveling
manure until she died a lonely old spinster.

She shoulda stayed in Oz.


Dallas
Anonymous
May 12, 2005 6:07:34 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

On Wed, 11 May 2005 16:07:25 +0100, Mark
<markbewick@corned.beef.gmail.com> wrote:

>Probably not...as they'll be banned from most US airports...they'll
>think of some excuse ala concorde (i.e. not made by USA we won't use
>or allow it).

Cynic :-0

However, Mark, I do wonder, would the once-proposed swing-wing Boeing
SST have been allowed to cross the USA?

James
May 13, 2005 8:09:03 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

"James Hodson"
> However, Mark, I do wonder, would the once-proposed swing-wing Boeing
> SST have been allowed to cross the USA?

Yes. Just not at supersonics speeds. :-)

I'm old enough to remember sonic booms before supersonic speeds were banned
over the US. A sonic boom is a very disruptive thing, it makes the walls
shake and rattles dishes in their cabinets. Reports of window breakage were
also quite common.

Dallas
Anonymous
May 13, 2005 8:09:04 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

In article <zLVge.6131$r7.5160@newsread1.news.pas.earthlink.net>,
Cybnorm@spam_me_not.Hotmail.Com says...
>
> I'm old enough to remember sonic booms before supersonic speeds were banned
> over the US.

Don't have to be old. The space shuttle makes a heck of a sonic boom.
My parents' place was on the shuttle's approach path to Edwards AFB.

/Chris
!