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Computer shuts down on XP install. CPU overheating? *FIXED*

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February 26, 2006 1:30:29 PM

Hi folks

I'm experiencing a strange problem with my new system. As soon as I reach a specific point in the Windows XP install, the system simply shuts down, as if someone pulled the power cord. The part of the XP install in question, is the part you reach after the disk has been formatted and the files have been copied and you have rebooted, i.e. the first time Windows runs (where it says "30 minutes left" and starts telling you how great an OS it is, etc.). After 5 or 10 seconds in this part of the install, it shuts down. I just think it is really odd that it is at this exact spot every time. Like something special happens here that triggers it.

I've tried different XP installation cds, but to no effect. So I figured it must be a hardware problem.

I noticed that the CPU temperature is pretty high immediately after each shut down (65-68C). I checked this in the BIOS. So could it be CPU overheating?

My second guess would be that it is a PSU problem.

My specs:

Athlon 64 X2 3800+
Asus A8N-SLI
eVGA 7800 GT CO
2x1 GB Kingston ValueRAM
Hitachi T7K250 SATA 250 GB HDD (On which I intend to install XP)
Maxtor DiamondMax 9 ATA 80 GB HDD
Antec TruePower 430W PSU

Note: The PSU is a couple of years old, so it does not have a 24-pin EATXPWR plug. So I corrected this by getting a 20 to 24 pin converter. Don't know if this matters, but the more information the better.

Any help would be greatly appreciated!
February 26, 2006 1:38:30 PM

I think you might be on the right track there.

I remember my linux machine wouldn't finish it's install since it was hitting high on CPU temp. (63C-65C - might have hit 70+ when it locked)

It seem like the installation was getting corrupted from the CPU overheating. Anyways.. installtion was better when I realised the heatsink need to be cleaned. :lol: 

So, I'd advise checking any problems in ventilation/cooling problems 1st, and take it from there as far as trouble shooting the rest of the system.
February 26, 2006 1:56:24 PM

Quote:
I think you might be on the right track there.

I remember my linux machine wouldn't finish it's install since it was hitting high on CPU temp. (63C-65C - might have hit 70+ when it locked)

It seem like the installation was getting corrupted from the CPU overheating. Anyways.. installtion was better when I realised the heatsink need to be cleaned. :lol: 

So, I'd advise checking any problems in ventilation/cooling problems 1st, and take it from there as far as trouble shooting the rest of the system.


I have to agree with Grimmy. If your CPU is getting to 68 Degrees (C) then I would check the fan and the case for proper cooling.
Are you using the CPU Cooler that came with CPU or are you using an after market cooler?

The other thing to check:
- What is the temp of the hard drive(s)? :oops: 
- You may have bad sector(s) on the hard drive and when windows get to that point then it reboots. 8O

Hope this may help :wink:
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February 26, 2006 2:27:37 PM

Thanks for your replies!

Yeah, I'm using the stock heatsink.

I think I'm going to try reinstalling the heatsink to make sure it is seated properly.

If that doesn't do the trick, then I'll try installing XP on the old HDD which I know works.
February 26, 2006 2:35:32 PM

Quote:
Thanks for your replies!

Yeah, I'm using the stock heatsink.

I think I'm going to try reinstalling the heatsink to make sure it is seated properly.

If that doesn't do the trick, then I'll try installing XP on the old HDD which I know works.


Sounds good. I just overheated a 400GB hard drive the other day. It overheated so much things actually statered to melt inside. :oops:  This is not normal and I will RMA back to the manufacture. :wink:
February 27, 2006 5:07:09 PM

While I was reinstalling the heatsink, I noticed that locking the cam handle twisted the spring and clips on the heatsink. Is that normal?

Pic: http://img506.imageshack.us/my.php?image=dsc005006hz.jpg

As you can see the clip is pushed hard to the left. I just fear that it might prevent proper contact between the HSF and CPU. Thoughts? Anyone have experience with socket 939 HSFs?
February 27, 2006 5:19:58 PM

Quote:
Note: The PSU is a couple of years old, so it does not have a 24-pin EATXPWR plug. So I corrected this by getting a 20 to 24 pin converter. Don't know if this matters, but the more information the better.

i think alot of people/site wont recommend this.
a) you should check the asus site to see if the 24pin is needed or if it can run of just 20pin. my msi board has a slot for 24 pins but i just plugged and 20pin psu to it and its fine. the manual says only 20pins are really necessary.
b) if you plug in with a 24 pins convertor, i think it's taxing the psu more then necessary.
c) not sure if im right, but i think the 4 extra pin is to provide extra power to the cpu (especially for intel chips) and/or the pci-e cards. so not having a native 24 pin psu might be a problem.
this might or might not be a problem, but just a possiblity

concerning the heatsink, is it possible to show a bigger picture? when i was installing my stock 939 HSF, i had to push it all the way untill the lever was parallel to the motherboard. at first i thought i was doing something wrong like using too much force but it eventually snapped on.
Also, if you removed and replaced the HSF, it might be recommended to clean the thermal pad(or whatever was on it) and reapply new one since that stuff isnt reusable. people seem to recommend artic silver stuff.
February 27, 2006 5:22:27 PM

Yes this is normal. However, keep the handle to the left before latching. Don't worry this will latch properly. I installed over 100 socket 939 and 754 fans without problems. :wink:
February 27, 2006 7:06:18 PM

Yes! Finally it works!

It was the heatsink as I suspected. I unhooked the handle so it doesn't force it to the left and voila, it runs like a dream!

Thanks for all your replies! You've been helpful!
!