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Don't buy HP -anything-

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December 16, 2004 3:04:45 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

I was trying to talk to someone at Hewlett Packard to get information
on identification and availability of parts for a printer a little more
than 5 years old. They don't offer support for products older than 5
years. It seems rather obvious to me that if a company does not expect
its products to have a chance of lasting 5 years, and then won't sell
or discuss parts availibility, then that comapany deserve the business
of no one. That company is Hewlett Packard and I strongly advise
anyone to not bother themselves with their products.

This was a high-end laserjet printer when it was new, unlike the newer,
more 'disposable' and cheaper inkjet printers.

Only a fool would buy HP knowing their policy is to make short lived
junk which they won't support.

Other companies, with other policies and principles, deserve your
business. HP does not.

More about : buy

December 16, 2004 5:17:51 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

grunt wrote:
> I was trying to talk to someone at Hewlett Packard to get information
> on identification and availability of parts for a printer a little more
> than 5 years old. They don't offer support for products older than 5
> years. It seems rather obvious to me that if a company does not expect
> its products to have a chance of lasting 5 years, and then won't sell
> or discuss parts availibility, then that comapany deserve the business
> of no one. That company is Hewlett Packard and I strongly advise
> anyone to not bother themselves with their products.
>
> This was a high-end laserjet printer when it was new, unlike the newer,
> more 'disposable' and cheaper inkjet printers.
>
> Only a fool would buy HP knowing their policy is to make short lived
> junk which they won't support.
>
> Other companies, with other policies and principles, deserve your
> business. HP does not.
>
I imagine you will be upset to realize that most computer/technology
companies that make consumer and prosumer products don't support
anything over 4 or 5 years old.
December 16, 2004 8:37:36 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

On Thu, 16 Dec 2004 14:17:51 -0600, chuck <chuck@no-spam.com> wrote:

>I imagine you will be upset to realize that most computer/technology
>companies that make consumer and prosumer products don't support
>anything over 4 or 5 years old.

So if third parties wanted to make aftermarket parts for the
'unsupported' products, it should be their right to do so.

It should be law that patented and proprietary products that are no
longer supported from the OEM should be available to companies that
are willing to incur the expense in manufacturing these items.

Dan
Related resources
Anonymous
a b α HP
December 16, 2004 8:37:37 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

In article <4d34s0h9noj6h418je9jc3s6lvuilbs388@4ax.com>,
Dan <jasdfosd@asjedfoi.com> wrote:

> On Thu, 16 Dec 2004 14:17:51 -0600, chuck <chuck@no-spam.com> wrote:
>
> >I imagine you will be upset to realize that most computer/technology
> >companies that make consumer and prosumer products don't support
> >anything over 4 or 5 years old.
>
> So if third parties wanted to make aftermarket parts for the
> 'unsupported' products, it should be their right to do so.
>
> It should be law that patented and proprietary products that are no
> longer supported from the OEM should be available to companies that
> are willing to incur the expense in manufacturing these items.
>
> Dan

Yes, that's what we need; more government involvement and laws. Let's
create a whole new bureaucracy: The Department of Homeland Obsolescence.
They could employ tens of thousands of unemployable people documenting
and licensing old inkjet cartridges.
Anonymous
a b α HP
December 16, 2004 10:56:02 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

"grunt" <geoffreygallo@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1103227485.356638.178970@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
>I was trying to talk to someone at Hewlett Packard to get information
> on identification and availability of parts for a printer a little more
> than 5 years old. They don't offer support for products older than 5
> years.

Did you search the HP parts website at http://partsurfer.hp.com ? I do not
know what model of LaserJet you have, but I put in the LaserJet II which I had
about 15 years ago and there are still quite a few parts offered for that old
printer. Check whether parts are available for yours. There should at least
be a parts list and exploded drawings showing the part numbers. If HP does not
still provide the parts there are
third party suppliers for many parts; a google search for one of the parts no
longer supplied by HP for the LaserJet II returned 63 hits, many of which
indicated the part is in stock.

I suspect parts for your model are still readily available.

Regards,
Bob Headrick, not speaking for my employer HP
December 16, 2004 11:58:06 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

hello microsoft..

i would like to get support on dos 1.0

hehehe...



--
insert witty comment here....
"chuck" <chuck@no-spam.com> wrote in message
news:32e8rgF3l4aelU1@individual.net...
> grunt wrote:
>> I was trying to talk to someone at Hewlett Packard to get information
>> on identification and availability of parts for a printer a little more
>> than 5 years old. They don't offer support for products older than 5
>> years. It seems rather obvious to me that if a company does not expect
>> its products to have a chance of lasting 5 years, and then won't sell
>> or discuss parts availibility, then that comapany deserve the business
>> of no one. That company is Hewlett Packard and I strongly advise
>> anyone to not bother themselves with their products.
>>
>> This was a high-end laserjet printer when it was new, unlike the newer,
>> more 'disposable' and cheaper inkjet printers.
>>
>> Only a fool would buy HP knowing their policy is to make short lived
>> junk which they won't support.
>>
>> Other companies, with other policies and principles, deserve your
>> business. HP does not.
>>
> I imagine you will be upset to realize that most computer/technology
> companies that make consumer and prosumer products don't support
> anything over 4 or 5 years old.
December 17, 2004 2:03:41 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

On Thu, 16 Dec 2004 14:46:46 -0800, StampOutDumbPosters
<StampOutDumbPosters@SpeakEnglishFool.org> wrote:

>Yes, that's what we need; more government involvement and laws. Let's
>create a whole new bureaucracy: The Department of Homeland Obsolescence.
>They could employ tens of thousands of unemployable people documenting
>and licensing old inkjet cartridges.

If you hate government so much, I suppose you wouldnt mind supporting
a bill wiping out that darn government law called a patent?

Dan
December 17, 2004 11:17:38 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

"chuck" <chuck@no-spam.com> wrote in message
news:32e8rgF3l4aelU1@individual.net...

> I imagine you will be upset to realize that most computer/technology
> companies that make consumer and prosumer products don't support
> anything over 4 or 5 years old.

I'm still using an HP Laserjet 5L at home that I bought 10 years ago. Every
now and then I clean it and throw in a new toner cartridge and it's given me
very little trouble. I downloaded the HP service manual (not from HP of
course, but they're out there somewhere) which helps me to take it apart
when necessary.

Mike
Anonymous
a b α HP
December 17, 2004 12:00:18 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Already come to this conclusion.

HP have been waving two fingers at their own customer-base
for years. The truly outrageous price of HP cartridges is simply
a ripoff - and is currently being investigated as such by the EC.

So its time we treated them the same way they treat us.

Show them two fingers and buy elsewhere.

Bloggy
Anonymous
a b α HP
December 18, 2004 4:49:16 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

I hate to say it, but HP isn't even a shadow of its former self.

They used to make quality products that were built to last, and for the
most part, last they did. In some cases, it may have been bad economy
to do so, because the technology people demanded made these items
obsolete anyway. I have two Laserjet model one printers, which still
work, but with the hard wired minimal 128K in them, they are almost
useless because one cannot print graphics with them. They use font
cartridges to produce the text for the most part. They are basically
beautiful works of engineering, and weight a ton, and probably would
work forever, but they now sit taking up space.

The irony is, as the printers were designed with expansion built in,
making them usable for longer use, the build quality declined, so they
lasted less time.

HP used to be a conscientious company run by the H and P families, and
the people who became executives came from the shop floors and worked
themselves up, so they knew most aspects and the culture promoted by the
company, which was determined by the H and P families. The company
seemed to be ethical, philanthropic, caring, and environmentally aware.

That time appears to be all but gone. The change to HP was when they
decided to become another corporate supplier of consumer electronics.
Lewis Platt got old and tired, and they brought in Carly Fiorina from
Lucent Tech. to revamp the company. Well, she did. With her $1000+
suits and her merger plans with Compaq that made her extremely wealthy,
she managed to get the H and P families removed from the board, fired
many wise and knowledgeable staff, spun off Agilent (the test equipment
division, and HP's origin) and made HP into what it is today, an ink and
paper company that mainly buys a lot of web, TV, print and shelf space
advertising in big box stores so they have a presence everywhere you look.

HP doesn't make many of the products with their name on them anymore.
They hire companies to make product to their specification, and
sometimes they do so poorly. Here in Canada, their customer service is
so poor, that some big box stores no longer carry some of their product
lines at all. Their CEO appears ruthless and questions still remain as
to if the shareholder Compaq merger vote was legitimately counted.

I have been an owner of HP stock for about 10 years. I watched the
stock split numerous times, and then regain full value on those
factional shares, making it one of the fastest growing companies in the
industry. I continued to buy into HP several times, the last being in
2000. I saw HP give free spin off shares of Agilent to their
stockholders that year. But more than anything, I bought HP because it
seems like a company that grew because it made good product and serviced
its clients well.

I am in the midst of selling off all my HP holdings. I should be
divested of them by the end of the year completely. As a result of "the
bubble bursting"??? or more likely the leadership of Carly Fiorina, the
many multiples of money I made on HP and its spin offs, collapsed and
disappeared. I could have made more putting the money in a low interest
savings bond. But that's now why I'm selling my shares now. I could
have done that years ago. I am doing it now, because I have given up on
the corporate management and vision of HP. Yes, they have some very
dedicated workers who are still there, although many have left either on
their own or been forced into early retirement. But, I think HP is now
beyond redemption under the current stewardship, and regardless as to
what happens to their stock value, I do not want to own this company any
longer.

This is no commentary on their inkjet products, by the way. I wouldn't
own shares in ANY inkjet company that is currently on the market. I
think they all need a good head shaking. But I will no longer be an
owner in a company that has slid so far off the skids when it come to a
caring corporate culture and responsibility to their employees and to
their clients. I had a lot of hope for HP when Carly Fiorina took over,
she talked the good talk, but she has shown herself to be, IMHO, bad for
HP and bad for the industry.

Art

grunt wrote:

> I was trying to talk to someone at Hewlett Packard to get information
> on identification and availability of parts for a printer a little more
> than 5 years old. They don't offer support for products older than 5
> years. It seems rather obvious to me that if a company does not expect
> its products to have a chance of lasting 5 years, and then won't sell
> or discuss parts availibility, then that comapany deserve the business
> of no one. That company is Hewlett Packard and I strongly advise
> anyone to not bother themselves with their products.
>
> This was a high-end laserjet printer when it was new, unlike the newer,
> more 'disposable' and cheaper inkjet printers.
>
> Only a fool would buy HP knowing their policy is to make short lived
> junk which they won't support.
>
> Other companies, with other policies and principles, deserve your
> business. HP does not.
>
Anonymous
a b α HP
December 18, 2004 5:00:09 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

The only way these issues will be dealt with is through legislative
change. The EU seems to be way ahead of North America is demanding
minimal standards of durability in products, access to parts and
consumables, etc.

Unless we demand better build and better service, we will continue o get
garbage. As long as we are willing to buy new junk, because it is cheap
to buy, and therefore replace, we will get junk that's cheap.

There is a balance needed between build quality, upgradability, and
obsolescence and we have yet to find that balance. We have also yet to
figure out how to build so we can reuse and recycle parts and materials
properly. Again, the EU has been the first to legislate "Take Back"
legislation requiring manufacturers to accept their "junk" back after it
is no longer usable.

In spite of my attitude about HP, they have been one of the first to
design their equipment to be easily broken down for recycling and
offering some form of "take back". It's half of the solution, the other
half being making the products durable enough that they last their
reasonable life span.

Art

Dan wrote:

> On Thu, 16 Dec 2004 14:17:51 -0600, chuck <chuck@no-spam.com> wrote:
>
>
>>I imagine you will be upset to realize that most computer/technology
>>companies that make consumer and prosumer products don't support
>>anything over 4 or 5 years old.
>
>
> So if third parties wanted to make aftermarket parts for the
> 'unsupported' products, it should be their right to do so.
>
> It should be law that patented and proprietary products that are no
> longer supported from the OEM should be available to companies that
> are willing to incur the expense in manufacturing these items.
>
> Dan
>
Anonymous
a b α HP
December 18, 2004 5:07:55 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

It is typical of extremists (strangely, usually coming from the right
wing) to come up with extremely useless over the top examples to try to
slander or belittle perfectly good concepts and intensions.

Using your logic, the next time you have a slight headache, consider
taking a couple of dozen bottles of ASA. When you get sick to your
stomach, and poison yourself doing so, you can demand to know who the
heck came up with the idea that aspirin is a reasonable treatment for a
mild headache.

I agree, let us "StampOutDumbPosters" by starting with YOU!

Art



StampOutDumbPosters wrote:

> In article <4d34s0h9noj6h418je9jc3s6lvuilbs388@4ax.com>,
> Dan <jasdfosd@asjedfoi.com> wrote:
>
>
>>On Thu, 16 Dec 2004 14:17:51 -0600, chuck <chuck@no-spam.com> wrote:
>>
>>
>>>I imagine you will be upset to realize that most computer/technology
>>>companies that make consumer and prosumer products don't support
>>>anything over 4 or 5 years old.
>>
>>So if third parties wanted to make aftermarket parts for the
>>'unsupported' products, it should be their right to do so.
>>
>>It should be law that patented and proprietary products that are no
>>longer supported from the OEM should be available to companies that
>>are willing to incur the expense in manufacturing these items.
>>
>>Dan
>
>
> Yes, that's what we need; more government involvement and laws. Let's
> create a whole new bureaucracy: The Department of Homeland Obsolescence.
> They could employ tens of thousands of unemployable people documenting
> and licensing old inkjet cartridges.
Anonymous
a b α HP
December 19, 2004 6:06:18 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

You really don't say what model printer you have. Or what parts you need.

Is it over 5 years old and probably TWELVE years old (LaserJet II) ??? Or
is it barely five years old??

HP parts has been good for me in past experiences. Did you try locating the
parts yourself at :

http://partsurfer.hp.com/cgi-bin/spi/main

Give it a try.

Bashing HP won't fix your printer.

"grunt" <geoffreygallo@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1103227485.356638.178970@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
> I was trying to talk to someone at Hewlett Packard to get information
> on identification and availability of parts for a printer a little more
> than 5 years old. They don't offer support for products older than 5
> years. It seems rather obvious to me that if a company does not expect
> its products to have a chance of lasting 5 years, and then won't sell
> or discuss parts availibility, then that comapany deserve the business
> of no one. That company is Hewlett Packard and I strongly advise
> anyone to not bother themselves with their products.
>
> This was a high-end laserjet printer when it was new, unlike the newer,
> more 'disposable' and cheaper inkjet printers.
>
> Only a fool would buy HP knowing their policy is to make short lived
> junk which they won't support.
>
> Other companies, with other policies and principles, deserve your
> business. HP does not.
>
December 20, 2004 10:31:03 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Actually I have never had any problems getting stuff from other makers such
as Epson and Canon, Compaq, Dell...HP seems singularly bad.

Toby

"chuck" <chuck@no-spam.com> wrote in message
news:32e8rgF3l4aelU1@individual.net...
> grunt wrote:
>> I was trying to talk to someone at Hewlett Packard to get information
>> on identification and availability of parts for a printer a little more
>> than 5 years old. They don't offer support for products older than 5
>> years. It seems rather obvious to me that if a company does not expect
>> its products to have a chance of lasting 5 years, and then won't sell
>> or discuss parts availibility, then that comapany deserve the business
>> of no one. That company is Hewlett Packard and I strongly advise
>> anyone to not bother themselves with their products.
>>
>> This was a high-end laserjet printer when it was new, unlike the newer,
>> more 'disposable' and cheaper inkjet printers.
>>
>> Only a fool would buy HP knowing their policy is to make short lived
>> junk which they won't support.
>>
>> Other companies, with other policies and principles, deserve your
>> business. HP does not.
>>
> I imagine you will be upset to realize that most computer/technology
> companies that make consumer and prosumer products don't support
> anything over 4 or 5 years old.
December 22, 2004 10:51:31 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

grunt wrote:
>
> I was trying to talk to someone at Hewlett Packard to get information
> on identification and availability of parts for a printer a little more
> than 5 years old. They don't offer support for products older than 5
> years. It seems rather obvious to me that if a company does not expect
> its products to have a chance of lasting 5 years, and then won't sell
> or discuss parts availibility, then that comapany deserve the business
> of no one. That company is Hewlett Packard and I strongly advise
> anyone to not bother themselves with their products.
>
> This was a high-end laserjet printer when it was new, unlike the newer,
> more 'disposable' and cheaper inkjet printers.
>
> Only a fool would buy HP knowing their policy is to make short lived
> junk which they won't support.
>
> Other companies, with other policies and principles, deserve your
> business. HP does not.


*Every* mfgr. nowadays wants their products to fade away soonest. HP is
isn't alone in this regard.

Actually the older high-end HP lasers are built like battleships and
seemingly go forever. Get something like a LJ-III or LJ-4, refurb. with
the help of any of the many aftermarketers, and don't look back. I just
set up an LJ-4 for my sister and she gave me an LJ-3 with PostScript
that needs a little TLC. Merry Christmas to both of us!
!