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Acrylric cases

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March 4, 2006 4:20:11 AM

i was looking through some see through cases that have uv lights of different colors. like this case

First of all are these cases solid and good?

Also what do you guys think of this design? in fashion and you would purchase it or ghey?

More about : acrylric cases

March 4, 2006 4:53:49 AM

I don't really like them acrylic cases. There solid and sturdy but I don't like the fact that you can see all the wires inside. My friend has one and it looks messy with all the wires and I can see some dust in there as well. It doesn't look clean to me.
March 4, 2006 5:42:39 AM

I got to build one for a customer. It is a interesting piece, but as Chuck said it raises some other issues. If you dont set it up with intake filters everone will know when you cleaned it last. The wires do take on a special problem, and strange as it sounds you start wanting longer wires so you can run them in different locations (still visable though). Screws, on a metal case it is really hard to messup the threads, on a clear case be careful so you dont crack it at the threads, etc....

Hey they are still kind of cool!

Oh, and they make clear power supplies also.

Lastly, I hope you build a machine primarily for what it can do, not what it looks like!
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March 4, 2006 12:02:59 PM

that case is nearly like mine. If you think about your cable managemet, it will not look messy. I like the fct that i can see inside. Also it is sometimes helpful to diagnose problems like unseated power plugs, etc. it can be helpful to be able to look in from all perspectives. if dirt collects, you should clean it out anyways, from a performance point of view.

If you are worryed about this case not having 120mm fans dont be. I've fond that usually you can leave 2 fans off, and having 2 remaining at 50% and 1 blowing at the gfx at 75% to keep my pc cool. When i do CPU intensive tasks the fans pick up a bit, keeping my CPU at a moderate 50°C under full load (with the old stock intel fan, I have a 3.2 GHz Northwood).

With some slight modifications (dont worry, no cutting or any damage to the case, just basically dividing the case into 2 Zones, with the gfx & pci in the bottom, the rest in the top one) all temps will drop by ca. another 5°C (i just let the front fan blow betwenn the hds, then connecting that area to the gfx with some foil for overhed projectors - that actually can look rather nice)

If you decide for that case and you have problems with the set up of the cooling, you can pm me or write me an e mail (nigelfarman@gmail.com) (i will be on holidays in 1 week for 3 weeks, and i dont know how the access to the internet is there, so i might be offline for a period of 3 days or so)
March 4, 2006 12:42:30 PM

Thats what im going to buy, im not bothered about the dust issue as i will buy filters, hopefully clear ones. But rember that dust too is UV reactive. I want to buy the clear non-UV one, and put some nice fire red/orange fans in it.

And as cowboy tech said, make sure that u have the hardware to go in it, and what does it matter what other people think, aslong as u like it, and it makes u smile everytime that u look at it, who cares.
March 9, 2006 7:11:34 AM

Ive had 2 acrylic cases. Some are solid, some are flimsy. One was a sunbeam. Different model then the one you're looking at, but it was very flimsy. The one you linked to appears to use 1/4" plexy throughout. This is a good thing. My sunbeam used 1/8".

Some negative aspects:
1) Scratch VERY easy unless pre-treated with a protective (and expensive)coating
2) Can crack very easy - you have to be gentle when tightening screws
3) Expensive-for the good ones that is.
4) If it has unsupported PS mounting (4 screws only with no shelf to carry the wieght of the PS) this can put heavy strain on the rear panel and cause "hazing" - minute internal stress fractures.
5) Standard acrylics are suseptable to HUGH static electricity build up.
6) - I cant prove it, but I'll throw it out anyway--appeared to be louder. Plexiglas's modulus of elasticity is lower than that of aluminum or steel--in short it has higher deflection under a given load i.e it will vibrate more "freely", thus transmit and/or generate more noise.



All I can say is, while they were neat to build and look at, I'll probably never build another acrylic case.
March 10, 2006 7:14:37 AM

Nah, they're not good. Even when built properly. There's a reason why major manufacturers don't use them.
March 10, 2006 8:29:22 AM

Thats a damn shame, but thanks for that info guys. I think that i will be going for an asus Vento then.
March 12, 2006 4:25:01 PM

I have to strongly disagree with all this negative mojo toward acrylic cases.

I have the Logisys Yin Yang full acrylic case. It is by far the best case that I have ever owned and I have built a lot of systems over the years. It is solid and thick. There has not been ANY static charge build up in any way. I agree that you have to be careful with screws to prevent cracking but all you have to do is be careful. My case has extra thick front and back plates and the power supply does not produce any hazing or put any strain on the case but with a cheap case I could see that it could be possible.

I use blue UV cable covers on all my cables so the inside of the case looks nice and organized. The cables even look cool and are a positive. Plus use blue UV round IDE cables and round sata cables and blue led fans. As far as dust goes I just blow out the case every three months with canned air. Though when it comes to dust it only makes sence that with a clear case you can see dust and with a metal case you can't. I used canned air every three months on my metal cases to keep the fans clean anyhow.

This is just my opinion but if you take a few extra steps an acrylic case is the coolest case you can own.
Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
March 14, 2006 5:49:24 PM

Quote:
There has not been ANY static charge build up in any way.


What are you testing static buildup voltages with? It is typically some extremely expensive and specialized equipment to test static buildup, ie your fluke DMM won't do it. If for example you are saying this thing since you haven't FELT any static discharges, and haven't actually done a measurment using the proper and calibrated equipment it would be very irresponsible to claim this. FYI (incase you didn't know this) the level of static discharge you can feel is quite a bit more energy than it takes to fry modern cmos circuits. Just curious how this statement came about since acrylic would definitely be a static risk if not handled properly.
March 14, 2006 6:13:17 PM

Hey knewton, he might have a case with a static-resistant coating...and even extremely low static charges attact dust.
March 14, 2006 6:30:11 PM

Just curious, anyone have any data, rumors, guesses, as to the EMI and RF emission and shielding of the Acrylic cases? Is permitting more EM radiation out and perhaps adversely impacting the people sitting around it? Are the components within more susceptible to the RF interference? Anyone consider these things?
Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
March 14, 2006 7:03:22 PM

True enough a coating could help quite a bit.
March 14, 2006 7:05:30 PM

I have also found that acrylic cases are not as quiet as pointed out by turpit. The material just doesn't have the ability to dampen vibrations the way another material can. But if its the look you are going for then the slightly increased noise level won't be a problem. Personally, I think that if the wiring and the lighting is done well it looks really cool.
Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
March 14, 2006 7:08:00 PM

The electrical properties of acrylic are the opposite of what a good shield is made of. In other words the acrylic will offer little to no shielding for electric or magnetic fields. This means into or out of...emissions from the system will have little to block them from radiating into the environment, and any fields from nearby devices will have their way with the PC.
March 14, 2006 7:19:45 PM

Quote:
Just curious, anyone have any data, rumors, guesses, as to the EMI and RF emission and shielding of the Acrylic cases? Is permitting more EM radiation out and perhaps adversely impacting the people sitting around it? Are the components within more susceptible to the RF interference? Anyone consider these things?


Electrical components that might generate em radiation are strictly regulated by the government. Look on ANY electronic item bought here in the states, and you'll see something that states (paraphrased): this item is not allowed to create EM interference and must accept any imposed upon it.

Point is, no shielding is needed on acrylic cases. All components are grounded by the ground wire plugged into the power supply. You're in more danger from the polluted air you breathe in every day.

Of course, if you're still not convinced, you don't have to buy an acrylic case.
March 14, 2006 8:04:31 PM

And we all trust the Government regulations especially now that "W" has gutted the EPA! As if there is no pollution and that there is no greenhouse effect, or there is no global warming!! Bury your head in the sand approach to things works real good! Ignorance is blisss, and dumping more dollars into gear naturally makes it all better.

Seriously, even enclosed steal cases, or those plastic with foil linings like those in Apples, Dells, HP, etc. have failed TUV/FCC/EMI testing if so much as a front plate was detached. That is why I would worry about an all acrylic case. Would lining the interior, or armoring the exterior of an acrylic case with a one of those nice hexagonal aluminum meshes achieve the necessary shielding?
March 14, 2006 8:30:34 PM

Quote:
Electrical components that might generate em radiation are strictly regulated by the government. Look on ANY electronic item bought here in the states, and you'll see something that states (paraphrased): this item is not allowed to create EM interference and must accept any imposed upon it.

Point is, no shielding is needed on acrylic cases.


You're making a big mistake here, an assumption that could be a lie depending on the source!

There is a reason why clear Mac computer cases had a shield (with see-through holes) under the Acrylic! The reason is, ACRYLIC CASES DO NOT MEET FCC REGULATIONS.

How is it possible to sell them then? Easy, EMPTY CASES DON'T MAKE EMI! You have to put a system into them. And each of the components in that system doesn't have any FCC regulation, because it's meant to be used in a SHIELDED CASE. In other words, every company selling components bypasses the law by selling you a device that, by itself, doesn't function. IT'S THE COMPLETE UNIT THAT FUNCTIONS, and YOU build the complete unit.

You can buy replacement Microwave Magnatrons on the open market. Microwave Ovens are shielded too, but if you were to put that magnatron in a cardboard box, it wouldn't be!

The frequencies typical computer components emit are NOT considered a health hazard. The FCC regulations in question here concern protecting the operation of communications equipment.

In fact, there are ways to skirt the law. Non-regulated equipment, such as individual components, are required by FCC regulation to be moved to a non-interfering location if they interfere with such things as radio reception. Of course, nobody here cares about it, but the FCC could rack up huge fines against any vender selling complete systems that interfere with radio or TV reception.

There are of course CUSTOM BUILDERS who build what would be considered illegal equipment, PC's that are intended to be used in the typical household, where they will interfere with communications equipment within that household. But the only way to "shut them down" is to prove it, by purchasing the system, then filing a complaint. The remaining problem is, the custom builder would probably be allowed to rectify the situation by replacing your case with a non-acrylic unit!

And when you build your own clear system, who will you file the complaint against, yourself? The manufacturer of the components is only responsible for that part, you're responsible for the assembled system.
March 14, 2006 9:01:39 PM

Apple managed EMI with a metal mesh.
Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
March 14, 2006 9:53:30 PM

I agree with what crash said , but just to add a little more to the pot...

Actually there are classes of electronic devices which are not required to pass any level of certification, ie unintentional radiators.

Our pc's are classified as IT communications equipment (or something similar to this) and thus fall under a class that is required to certify.

Another clarification: The entire system is the thing that is required to pass not the individual electronic pieces that make it up. Because of this shielding is a tool which can be used to help bring a noisy product into compliance. Just using the acrylic would not guarantee failure only that it wont offer any aditional attenuation of the emissions signals. If for example the device meets spec with no shielding then it will still meet with the acrylic case installed. Likewise if a product isn't passing, adding the acrylic case wont get it to pass.

In other words if your system passes naked it will still pass when you add the acrylic case. If it doesn't pass nekid then the acrylic case wont make it any more likely to pass.
March 14, 2006 10:07:06 PM

I wouldn't be too sure about PC operating frequencies being totally harmless. I don't think there is enough data out there to say one way or the other. But fact remains that the GHz processors that we got are running at GHz frequencies which pretty similar to that of microwaves and cell phones. And to claim that their radiation is harmless is just recklessness promoted by corporations eager to sell their wares.
March 14, 2006 10:28:23 PM

have one they are allright just they scratch easily
March 14, 2006 11:22:30 PM

I have two cases with three acrylic panels (the sides and top).
They actually are fairly resistant to scratches, but the 4 yr old case has a quite a few faint/shallow thus hard to see scratches. 4 month old case has none detectable.
Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
March 14, 2006 11:50:33 PM

Quote:
I wouldn't be too sure about PC operating frequencies being totally harmless.


Was that thing aimed at me? I would never say that emissions aren't harmful in fact I have no idea what effect emissions have on humans. Either you misunderstood something I said or are talking to someone else.

Edit: actually it isn't too tough to make gross generalizations about how em energy reacts with flesh on a pretty wide scale but in the case of these smaller signals I think the long term effects of these smaller signals is what you are really refering to and thats what I don't understand.
March 16, 2006 6:33:48 PM

Quote:
I wouldn't be too sure about PC operating frequencies being totally harmless. I don't think there is enough data out there to say one way or the other. But fact remains that the GHz processors that we got are running at GHz frequencies which pretty similar to that of microwaves and cell phones. And to claim that their radiation is harmless is just recklessness promoted by corporations eager to sell their wares.


True, computers do run at GHz frequencies. But you are leaving out the fact that they are not designed to transmit. Part of the reason why they are not dangerous is that their radiation leakage is quite small. To add to that, the radiation weakens geometrically from the source, much like a light bulb. I bet you're in more radiation danger from the sun. Comparing PCs to microwaves and cell phones? THEY ARE DESIGNED TO TRANSMIT AT GHZ FREQUENCIES, PCS ARE NOT! Here's a test to see how much a PC radiates:
Turn on your computer. Put your cell phone next to your computer. Can it make and receive calls? Test over.

Yet you would make a cell phone call while next to your computer and complain about the radiation of the computer?
March 16, 2006 9:07:12 PM

My old PC interfered with 900MHz analog phones when the case was open, but only at short distances. My Microwave interfered with 2.4GHz phones. I ended up getting a 900MHz DIGITAL phone and closing the case :) 
!