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Inkjet printer for Linux suggestion, please.

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December 22, 2004 5:48:54 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

I thought I'd buy a cheap laser printer but there seems to be driver
considerations at the present time with Linux. So I might go for an inkjet
printer. Besides, when the printer is inexpensive, the toner is not :(  Same
problem as for inkjet printers, just to a lesser degree maybe.

Besides Canon, is there any Linux-compatible inkjet printer with the printhead
in the cartridge (so that I may refill them without worry) that you would
suggest? I don't care so much about optimum quality, speed and even B&W would
be OK... though I suppose they don't exist anymore :) 

GP
December 22, 2004 5:58:49 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

GP wrote:
> I thought I'd buy a cheap laser printer but there seems to be driver
> considerations at the present time with Linux. So I might go for an
> inkjet printer. Besides, when the printer is inexpensive, the toner is
> not :(  Same problem as for inkjet printers, just to a lesser degree maybe.
>
> Besides Canon, is there any Linux-compatible inkjet printer with the
> printhead in the cartridge (so that I may refill them without worry)
> that you would suggest? I don't care so much about optimum quality,
> speed and even B&W would be OK.

In a word: Linux compatible, cheap, worry free. Quality, speed, even color,
not that important.

Does the HP PSC-1315 have a separate print head? It's not that cheap, but it
does more. Are refills available?

GP
Anonymous
December 22, 2004 10:24:03 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

"GP" <gilpel@inverse.nretla.org> wrote in message
news:10si9i6kkuvah06@corp.supernews.com...

> Besides Canon, is there any Linux-compatible inkjet printer with the
> printhead in the cartridge (so that I may refill them without worry) that you
> would suggest? I don't care so much about optimum quality, speed and even B&W
> would be OK... though I suppose they don't exist anymore :) 

http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/genericDocument?lc=e...
and
http://h20000.www2.hp.com/bizsupport/TechSupport/Docume...
have links to Linux drivers for most HP DeskJet and PSC or Officejet units.

Specific models supported are listed at:
http://hpinkjet.sourceforge.net/productssupported.php and
http://hpoj.sourceforge.net/suplist.shtml .

All the DeskJet, Photosmart and PSC units have printheads in the cartridge.
All the listed Officejet units except the D series and the 7110, 7130 and 7140
units have printheads in the cartridge.

Regards,
Bob Headrick, not speaking for my employer HP


has drivers for various HP inkjet printers. The PSC 1315 is a host based
printer and may be less suitable.
Related resources
Anonymous
December 22, 2004 11:55:00 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

The Brother HL-1440 is supposed to work well in Linux. :) 
December 22, 2004 2:12:56 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

NJ wrote:
> The Brother HL-1440 is supposed to work well in Linux. :) 

I called Brother and asked what was their cheapest printer offering PCL and
Postscript, which IMO makes it /really/ no-fuss with Linux, and the printer
was twice as expensive as the HL-1435. The model was someting like a HL-5150D
(not sure).

GP
December 22, 2004 2:35:46 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Bob Headrick wrote:

> "GP" <gilpel@inverse.nretla.org> wrote in message
> news:10si9i6kkuvah06@corp.supernews.com...
>
>
>>Besides Canon, is there any Linux-compatible inkjet printer with the
>>printhead in the cartridge (so that I may refill them without worry) that you
>>would suggest? I don't care so much about optimum quality, speed and even B&W
>>would be OK... though I suppose they don't exist anymore :) 
>
>
> http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/genericDocument?lc=e...

I was considering the Laserjet 1012, but it's not listed as Linux-compatible.
Besides the printer is 20% more expensive since december 10th because the $50
rebate is not valid anymore. What a lousy marketing scheme!

> The PSC 1315 is a host based
> printer and may be less suitable.

I don't care if the printer uses my CPU but I suppose what you really mean is
"Windows or Mac OS host based". It's a shame that your employer pretends to
support Linux when most of the cheaper interesting models are Windows/Mac only.

> Bob Headrick, not speaking for my employer HP

It's nice to have somebody from HP giving pertinent info on the group... and
hopefully taking note of comments :) 

May someday all HP laser printers be PCL/Ghostscript compatible!

GP
December 22, 2004 11:01:47 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

NJ wrote:
> http://www.linuxquestions.org/hcl/showproduct.php?produ...

Interesting. It doesn't offer Postscript, but PCL 4. At 2 MB, memory seems
rather low. The Lexmark offers 16. Isn't this a cause for concern?

The most recent drivers are PCL 6. What's the difference? I believe PCL was
developed by HP, right? And many companies use it, though it's not open
source. Can you give me more information about this?

Does Ghostscript work with the latest versions of Postscript? What's the
advantage of Ghostscript over PCL or vice-versa?

Etc. As you can see, I'm a complete newbie in printer emulations. Any
information would be greatly appreciated.

GP
Anonymous
December 23, 2004 12:06:34 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

"GP" <gilpel@inverse.nretla.org> wrote in message
news:10sj8e0sgpibm36@corp.supernews.com...
> Bob Headrick wrote:
>> The PSC 1315 is a host based printer and may be less suitable.
>
> I don't care if the printer uses my CPU but I suppose what you really mean is
> "Windows or Mac OS host based". It's a shame that your employer pretends to
> support Linux when most of the cheaper interesting models are Windows/Mac
> only.

This is not true. There is a Linux driver available for the PSC 1350, as
described at http://hpoj.sourceforge.net/suplist.shtml . HP supplies support
and resources to the Linux driver team. Being a host based printer means there
will be more load on your host CPU and also more data needs to be sent to the
printer since the driver must send information for each individual drop firing.
I do not know it you took a look at the links I posted previously, but
http://www.linuxprinting.org/printer_list.cgi?make=HP lists perhaps two hundred
or more HP models supported "perfectly", maybe eighty supported "mostly", and
four listed as "paperweight". Of the five supported only "partially", one is
the original ThinkJet introduced in 1984.

> May someday all HP laser printers be PCL/Ghostscript compatible!

Probably not. There will probably always be demand for printers focused on low
cost at some expense of performance, while others will want the full featured
printers at some additional cost.

Regards,
Bob Headrick, not speaking for my employer HP
Anonymous
December 23, 2004 1:11:09 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

In article <10sj8e0sgpibm36@corp.supernews.com>, GP wrote:
> It's nice to have somebody from HP giving pertinent info on the group... and
> hopefully taking note of comments :) 
>
> May someday all HP laser printers be PCL/Ghostscript compatible!

If people want cheap, they get cheap. What we need is HP to
describe the printer comms, so someone else can write a Linux
driver, og better yet, have HP Open Source their MacOS X drivers.
(MacOS X = FreeBSD with CUPS).

--
Povl H. Pedersen - NoSpam@my.terminal.dk (yes - it works)
Fastnet - IP telefoni: 5 kr/md Se http://www.musimi.dk
December 23, 2004 1:11:10 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Povl H. Pedersen wrote:
> In article <10sj8e0sgpibm36@corp.supernews.com>, GP wrote:
>
>>It's nice to have somebody from HP giving pertinent info on the group... and
>>hopefully taking note of comments :) 
>>
>>May someday all HP laser printers be PCL/Ghostscript compatible!
>
>
> If people want cheap, they get cheap. What we need is HP to
> describe the printer comms, so someone else can write a Linux
> driver, og better yet, have HP Open Source their MacOS X drivers.
> (MacOS X = FreeBSD with CUPS).

You mean we'd all be better off if hardware manufacturers concentrated on
manufacturing hardware? I'm afraid it's been said before, but manufacturers
have to learn the hard way. Ask Sun :) 

IBM has apparently understood but offers support only for Red Hat and Suse.
But I'm a Slacker. I could convert to Debian, but never to Bed Rat. I tried
Suse maybe 2 years ago and didn't like it.

What are my chances of being able to run a Lexmark E232 on Slack or Debian
without too much hassle... I really mean NO hassle.

GP
Anonymous
December 23, 2004 1:11:10 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

"Povl H. Pedersen" <povlhp@povl-h-pedersens-computer.local> wrote in message
news:slrncsjs7s.10e.povlhp@povl-h-pedersens-computer.local...
> In article <10sj8e0sgpibm36@corp.supernews.com>, GP wrote:
>> It's nice to have somebody from HP giving pertinent info on the group... and
>> hopefully taking note of comments :) 
>>
>> May someday all HP laser printers be PCL/Ghostscript compatible!
>
> If people want cheap, they get cheap. What we need is HP to
> describe the printer comms, so someone else can write a Linux
> driver, og better yet, have HP Open Source their MacOS X drivers.
> (MacOS X = FreeBSD with CUPS).

HP supports Linux drivers on several levels, including development information.
See http://hpinkjet.sourceforge.net/ .

Regards,
Bob Headrick, not speaking for my employer HP
Anonymous
December 23, 2004 2:16:34 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

GP <gilpel@inverse.nretla.org> wrote:
> GP wrote:
>> I thought I'd buy a cheap laser printer but there seems to be driver
>> considerations at the present time with Linux. So I might go for an
>> inkjet printer. Besides, when the printer is inexpensive, the toner is
>> not :(  Same problem as for inkjet printers, just to a lesser degree maybe.

> In a word: Linux compatible, cheap, worry free. Quality, speed, even color,
> not that important.

HP LaserJet 4/5 models are not hard to find, and can cost less than the
cheapest of new lasers. The 4M and 5M have native PostScript, so you
don't have to deal with weird inkjet drivers. (Or other inkjet issues.)

--
Warren Block * Rapid City, South Dakota * USA
Anonymous
December 23, 2004 4:37:43 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

GP <gilpel@inverse.nretla.org> wrote:

> Does Ghostscript work with the latest versions of Postscript? What's the
> advantage of Ghostscript over PCL or vice-versa?

Ghostscript is a PostScript interpreter that runs on the computer
instead of in the printer.

If your printer already has PostScript, you don't need Ghostscript at
all. If your printer only has PCL, you use Ghostscript to process
PostScript into PCL, then send that to the printer.

--
Warren Block * Rapid City, South Dakota * USA
Anonymous
December 23, 2004 9:23:21 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

In article <slrncsk02i.2aco.wblock@speedy.wonkity.com>, Warren Block wrote:
> HP LaserJet 4/5 models are not hard to find, and can cost less than the
> cheapest of new lasers. The 4M and 5M have native PostScript, so you
> don't have to deal with weird inkjet drivers. (Or other inkjet issues.)

I personally got the LaserJet 1200 1-2 years ago. Also PCL6 + Postscript,
so it is my workhorse. Sits on my Linux box and is shared using cups,
for both MacOS X and Windows.

--
Povl H. Pedersen - NoSpam@my.terminal.dk (yes - it works)
Fastnet - IP telefoni: 5 kr/md Se http://www.musimi.dk
Anonymous
December 23, 2004 11:31:01 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Bob Headrick wrote:

> "GP" <gilpel@inverse.nretla.org> wrote in message
> news:10sj8e0sgpibm36@corp.supernews.com...
>
>>Bob Headrick wrote:
>>
>>>The PSC 1315 is a host based printer and may be less suitable.
>>
>>I don't care if the printer uses my CPU but I suppose what you really mean is
>>"Windows or Mac OS host based". It's a shame that your employer pretends to
>>support Linux when most of the cheaper interesting models are Windows/Mac
>>only.
>
>
> This is not true. There is a Linux driver available for the PSC 1350, as
> described at http://hpoj.sourceforge.net/suplist.shtml . HP supplies support
> and resources to the Linux driver team. Being a host based printer means there
> will be more load on your host CPU and also more data needs to be sent to the
> printer since the driver must send information for each individual drop firing.
> I do not know it you took a look at the links I posted previously, but
> http://www.linuxprinting.org/printer_list.cgi?make=HP lists perhaps two hundred
> or more HP models supported "perfectly", maybe eighty supported "mostly", and
> four listed as "paperweight". Of the five supported only "partially", one is
> the original ThinkJet introduced in 1984.
>
>
>>May someday all HP laser printers be PCL/Ghostscript compatible!
>
>
> Probably not. There will probably always be demand for printers focused on low
> cost at some expense of performance, while others will want the full featured
> printers at some additional cost.
>
> Regards,
> Bob Headrick, not speaking for my employer HP
>
>
>

Really cheap customers will never vanish from the face of the earth.

In their deep black hearts, cheap people would like companies to go
broke giving them everything. Then, when they next wave of companies
comes along, they will try to con them into doing the same thing.


--
................................


Keepsake gift for young girls.
Unique and personal one-of-a-kind.
Builds strong minds 12 ways.
Guaranteed satisfaction
- courteous money back
- keep bonus gifts

http://www.alicebook.com
December 23, 2004 6:19:57 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

GP wrote:
>
> I thought I'd buy a cheap laser printer but there seems to be driver
> considerations at the present time with Linux. So I might go for an inkjet
> printer. Besides, when the printer is inexpensive, the toner is not :(  Same
> problem as for inkjet printers, just to a lesser degree maybe.
>
> Besides Canon, is there any Linux-compatible inkjet printer with the printhead
> in the cartridge (so that I may refill them without worry) that you would
> suggest? I don't care so much about optimum quality, speed and even B&W would
> be OK... though I suppose they don't exist anymore :) 
>
> GP

I don't know what your problem with finding a laser printer for Linux
is; any laser printer that has PCL support really should work. I have
been using a HP LJ 1100A with Slackware for a few years now. It works
great, too. The ghostscript printer driver I use for the HP LJ 1100 is
the HP LJ 4D (ljet4d) driver. There is a command that you can use that
will show you what ghostscript printer drivers are available on your
system, but I can't think of it at the present. If you are familiar with
Apsfilter you can find out what printer drivers are available with
it--every Slackware box comes with Apsfilter. If you are not familiar
with Apsfilter just read the email from Patrick in the root account.

Another suggestion is to checkout; www.linuxprinting.org--should give
you some ideas on what ghostscript printer drivers to use with the
various different laser printers. I just went to:
http://www.linuxprinting.org/printer_list.cg and checked out just the HP
laser printers that work with Linux and there were about 30 of them. Not
to mention the other printers from Brother, Canon, Samsung, and etc.

BTW, I didn't know any Canon inkjet printers used cartridges that have
the printhead in them.

Good luck,

jamess
December 23, 2004 9:10:07 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Warren Block wrote:

> GP <gilpel@inverse.nretla.org> wrote:
>
>
>>Does Ghostscript work with the latest versions of Postscript? What's the
>>advantage of Ghostscript over PCL or vice-versa?
>
>
> Ghostscript is a PostScript interpreter that runs on the computer
> instead of in the printer.
>
> If your printer already has PostScript, you don't need Ghostscript at
> all. If your printer only has PCL, you use Ghostscript to process
> PostScript into PCL, then send that to the printer.

According to APSFILTER, the situation is more complicated. The 3 first choices
are:

1) PostScript printer (generic)
2) PostScript printer (with ghostscript drivers)
3) printer driver natively supported by ghostscript

So, accordning to choice 2, you can have a PostScript printer with ghostscript
drivers.

Also, I was quite surprised to find that some inkjet printers, such as my
Canon BJ-300 were "natively supported by ghostscript".

Do you have a link where I can learn more?

GP
December 23, 2004 9:16:31 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Warren Block wrote:
> GP <gilpel@inverse.nretla.org> wrote:
>
>>GP wrote:
>>
>>>I thought I'd buy a cheap laser printer but there seems to be driver
>>>considerations at the present time with Linux. So I might go for an
>>>inkjet printer. Besides, when the printer is inexpensive, the toner is
>>>not :(  Same problem as for inkjet printers, just to a lesser degree maybe.
>
>
>>In a word: Linux compatible, cheap, worry free. Quality, speed, even color,
>>not that important.
>
>
> HP LaserJet 4/5 models are not hard to find, and can cost less than the
> cheapest of new lasers. The 4M and 5M have native PostScript, so you
> don't have to deal with weird inkjet drivers. (Or other inkjet issues.)

I don't htink I would buy a used printer. I remember one of those HL Laserjet
4 at school printing about 1,000 pages a day, pretty much every day of the
year. Let's round up to 300,000 pages a year. That's a lot of printing!

It's hard to know what you get when you buy used.

GP
December 23, 2004 10:31:09 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Bob Headrick wrote:
> "GP" <gilpel@inverse.nretla.org> wrote in message
> news:10sj8e0sgpibm36@corp.supernews.com...
>
>>Bob Headrick wrote:
>>
>>>The PSC 1315 is a host based printer and may be less suitable.
>>
>>I don't care if the printer uses my CPU but I suppose what you really mean is
>>"Windows or Mac OS host based". It's a shame that your employer pretends to
>>support Linux when most of the cheaper interesting models are Windows/Mac
>>only.
>
>
> This is not true. There is a Linux driver available for the PSC 1350, as
> described at http://hpoj.sourceforge.net/suplist.shtml .

Gee, how could I miss this? I mean, you've got to look at the right place,
that's all!

It's not even listed at linuxprinting.org ! The PSC 1310 is, but not the 1315.
And sometimes, what a difference a 5 makes!

There's no mention at HP on the printer's main page:

<http://h10010.www1.hp.com/wwpc/us/en/sm/WF06b/18972-238...;

That's not what I mean by /supporting/ Linux.

Thanks nonetheless for the info :) 

> HP supplies support
> and resources to the Linux driver team. Being a host based printer means there
> will be more load on your host CPU and also more data needs to be sent to the
> printer since the driver must send information for each individual drop firing.

But, still, it should print "up to" 7.5 ppm in B&W? If "up to" means more than
5, it's ok to me.

> I do not know it you took a look at the links I posted previously, but
> http://www.linuxprinting.org/printer_list.cgi?make=HP lists perhaps two hundred
> or more HP models supported "perfectly", maybe eighty supported "mostly", and
> four listed as "paperweight". Of the five supported only "partially", one is
> the original ThinkJet introduced in 1984.

To tell you the truth, I'm not really interested in buying a 1984 printer. I
even doubt they are sold anymore :) 

But if you go at Staples, you know that's a place where Joe Doe buy printers,
and check HP printers under 300$ (CAN), there's one model: the 1210.

<http://www.staples.ca/ENG/Catalog/cat_class.asp?CatIds=...;

I don't care about the 200 other models supported in the last 20 years. I
don't care if a 1,000$ model doesn't support Linux. Joe Doe and me don't print
more than 500 pages a year and buying a 1,000$ model would be pure nonsense.

>>May someday all HP laser printers be PCL/Ghostscript compatible!

> Probably not. There will probably always be demand for printers focused on low
> cost at some expense of performance, while others will want the full featured
> printers at some additional cost.

We're not talking about performance. Some people need performance, but Joe Doe
-- you know, this guy who'd be glad to get out of M$ claws if only Linux was
not such a pain when it comes to finding cheap and easy to install hardware --
doesn't need performance. He needs a plain and simple little printer.

And now, he goes to Staples and can't use the cheap HP printer he wants with
Linux. Once again, that's what I mean by HP not supporting Linux.

What makes PCL printers more expensive?

Are the rights paid to Adobe on Postcript that high?

As I said in a previous post, my Canon BJ-300 used a "driver natively
supported by ghostscript". All I had to do, either in Apsfilter (Slackware) or
CUPS (Knoppix), is choose the driver in a list. Wouldn't it be possible to do
the same with a laser printer?

GP
December 26, 2004 12:39:33 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

On Thu, 23 Dec 2004 19:31:09 -0500, GP <gilpel@inverse.nretla.org>
wrote:

>What makes PCL printers more expensive?

They need more RAM and processing power on board than host based.

>Are the rights paid to Adobe on Postcript that high?

Apparently; which is why HP does PostScript *emulation" now -- all its
"PS compatible" printers use cloned PS interpreters, not Adobe ones.

>As I said in a previous post, my Canon BJ-300 used a "driver natively
>supported by ghostscript". All I had to do, either in Apsfilter (Slackware) or
>CUPS (Knoppix), is choose the driver in a list. Wouldn't it be possible to do
>the same with a laser printer?

Mostly, except for the very cheapest (Winprinter) models.

Just check out printer models by looking at their specs (if they
support PS or PCL, no problem with Linux), and see what
<http://www.linuxprinting.org/&gt; says about them.
December 26, 2004 12:39:34 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Alan wrote:
> On Thu, 23 Dec 2004 19:31:09 -0500, GP <gilpel@inverse.nretla.org>
> wrote:
>
>
>>What makes PCL printers more expensive?

> They need more RAM and processing power on board than host based.

Still, it seems some printers, e.g. the Lexmark E232, are host-based but offer
PCL.

See:
http://www.eurobild.ro/pdf/E232_RO.pdf

This page also says that the Postscript 3 provided is only for Mac OS X ?

>>Are the rights paid to Adobe on Postcript that high?
>
>
> Apparently; which is why HP does PostScript *emulation" now -- all its
> "PS compatible" printers use cloned PS interpreters, not Adobe ones.
>
>
>>As I said in a previous post, my Canon BJ-300 used a "driver natively
>>supported by ghostscript". All I had to do, either in Apsfilter (Slackware) or
>>CUPS (Knoppix), is choose the driver in a list. Wouldn't it be possible to do
>>the same with a laser printer?

> Mostly, except for the very cheapest (Winprinter) models.

Do you really mean that all printers except Winprinters can be used with
ghostscript?

> Just check out printer models by looking at their specs (if they
> support PS or PCL, no problem with Linux), and see what
> <http://www.linuxprinting.org/&gt; says about them.

The laser printers I'm considering now at Staples:

Laserjet 1012:

http://linuxprinting.org/show_printer.cgi?recnum=HP-Las...

Reports are rather iffy:

«Sometimes it happens that the printer stops working and reports the error
"Unsupported Personality: PCL".» On the HP forum, an HP representative says
it's better not to count on HP fixing the problem.

Lexmark E232:

Not listed. Lexmark says they only support Red Hat and Suse. I don't and won't
use either.

Samsung ML-1740:

Not listed. Supposed to work with any Linux you can throw at it with some
Samsung proprietary language.

------------

Considering I want a cheap, new, easy to install printer with Slackware/Debian
and even 5 ppm would be OK, what would you suggest I go for?

GP
December 26, 2004 12:39:43 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

On Thu, 23 Dec 2004 18:10:07 -0500, GP <gilpel@inverse.nretla.org>
wrote:

>Warren Block wrote:

>> If your printer already has PostScript, you don't need Ghostscript at
>> all. If your printer only has PCL, you use Ghostscript to process
>> PostScript into PCL, then send that to the printer.
>
>According to APSFILTER, the situation is more complicated. The 3 first choices
>are:
>
>1) PostScript printer (generic)
>2) PostScript printer (with ghostscript drivers)
>3) printer driver natively supported by ghostscript
>
>So, accordning to choice 2, you can have a PostScript printer with ghostscript
>drivers.

Well, yes, but this is basically augmenting the postscript, by
embedding fonts, for instance. You can still print PS without this,
just without some features supplied by the software.

>Also, I was quite surprised to find that some inkjet printers, such as my
>Canon BJ-300 were "natively supported by ghostscript".

"Native support" means that the language of the printer is well-enough
documented that someone has been able to write a GS driver for it,
thus translating PS to its language, The other way GS works is
(especially under Windows) to use the driver supplied by the
manufacturer, and feed data to that. So many Winprinters can be made
to work with GS under Windows by this method, but not on other
platforms.

>Do you have a link where I can learn more?

There is a lot of info about PostScript on the web. Start at Adobe.com
and the Ghostscript home page. It's favoured because it's powerful,
and well-documented, and is easily manipulated to preprocess and
analyse files before output.
December 26, 2004 12:39:45 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

On Thu, 23 Dec 2004 18:16:31 -0500, GP <gilpel@inverse.nretla.org>
wrote:

>I don't htink I would buy a used printer. I remember one of those HL Laserjet
>4 at school printing about 1,000 pages a day, pretty much every day of the
>year. Let's round up to 300,000 pages a year. That's a lot of printing!
>
>It's hard to know what you get when you buy used.

I'd assume if it's printed 300,000 pages and is demonstrably still
working that it'll probably last indefinitely. These are
well-understood and supported, if anything does wear out it's easy to
get parts. They were designed to be workgroup printers, so running
them single user is just idling.

Coincidentally, I bought an LJ4 with 300k on the clock early this year
and I'm very happy with it.
Anonymous
December 28, 2004 6:29:26 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

I didn't see the beginning of this thread, but both of my HP printers (HP
deskjet 6122 and HP photosmart 375B) work fine with Linux (Fedora core 2).
Note, Fedora doesn't yet list the 375B, but if I call it a 240, it works fine.

--
Michael Meissner
email: mrmnews@the-meissners.org
http://www.the-meissners.org
Anonymous
January 3, 2005 9:24:43 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

NJ wrote:
> The Brother HL-1440 is supposed to work well in Linux. :) 

It does work well. It's PCL emulation, and the memory is
small (2 mbytes), but that's good enough for 600x600 resolution.

Others here have mentioned wanting postscript etc., but with CUPS
it's not a concern.

HL-1440's were $99 at Staples yesterday. I brought it home, hooked
it up to a RH9 system with a parallel cable, used the GUI to configure
it, and like 30 seconds later was succesfully printing.

It might be harder if you need to use USB, I do not know if PCL
emulation works over USB, and there's a warning to not plug in the
USB cable until you've installed the Windows drivers or else you'll
screw up the printer.

Tim.
!