Does HyperThreading slow gaming performance?

I have a 3 GHz Prescott with HT enabled. Since I use my computer 50% of the time for gaming, I want to know if HT slows gaming performance.
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  1. Well it is a Pentium so yea it's going to hurt gaming :P

    Hehe not flaming just goof'n around
  2. Quote:
    Well it is a Pentium so yea it's going to hurt gaming :P

    Hehe not flaming just goof'n around
    I know I prefer AMD myself but had no choice for the processor and motherboard on this build, chose everything else though, GPU, 160mm fan and PSU
  3. 160mm fan? where'd you get that? my case has a 140mm intake but I haven't seen any bigger anywhere
  4. Quote:
    160mm fan? where'd you get that? my case has a 140mm intake but I haven't seen any bigger anywhere
    Its a small modified house fan and this thing spins around 7100 rpms, of course it makes a lot of noise and moves more air than any PC fan, but Im a gamer and don't car about noise, just life of parts and visual quality.
  5. More than likely an easy way to tell, just run the game both ways and see. A lot of games have built in benchmarks.
  6. Quote:
    More than likely an easy way to tell, just run the game both ways and see. A lot of games have built in benchmarks.

    Figured as much, just wanted to see what other users thought in their experience.
  7. No, hyper-threading does negatively affects gaming however it doesn't really helps in increasing performance either. So that is why dual core are more expensive than a single core with hyper-threading. Although single core with hyper-threading has two logic core but you can only overclock the physical core. So right now for gaming dual core rules. :D
  8. No it won't hurt the performance of your gaming. I use mine, well, heh, let's say I used to use mine for heavy gaming but now I use my opty machine primarily for gaming now. However, my 630 machine does very well in gaming.
  9. Thanks for your imput guys, I don't do much heavy multitasking so my second question is does it does it increase heat?
  10. Quote:
    I have a 3 GHz Prescott with HT enabled. Since I use my computer 50% of the time for gaming, I want to know if HT slows gaming performance.


    Technically, yes, it affects overall performance.

    Both the Hyperthreading aware OS & the processor's logical partitioning units, are prepared to extract the most parallelization as possible, from the running application. It happens that, the majority of apps (games included) are single-threaded. End result: there's a latency penalty when using Hyperthreading with single-threaded software, althoug a small one (about 3 to 5%).

    The very usefulness of Hyperthreading, for now, is simultaneous multitasking, where at least two processes are running in parallel, with a significant advantage over non-Hyperthreading implemented processors.


    Cheers!
  11. Heat issues?
  12. Quote:
    No, hyper-threading does negatively affects gaming however it doesn't really helps in increasing performance either. So that is why dual core are more expensive than a single core with hyper-threading. Although single core with hyper-threading has two logic core but you can only overclock the physical core. So right now for gaming dual core rules. :D


    definitely not true... I noticed quite a increase in speed when I turned on HTT... and it seems faster for everything, including gaming 8)

    and, it does not increase heat.
  13. Quote:

    and, it does not increase heat.

    Good. End of subject, no more posting!
  14. Yes, Sir!


    (Oh! And this is not a post, OK?)


    Cheers! :wink:
  15. The cpu cycles used to imitate a second chip do reduce cycles available for gaming.
    Serious OCers turn HT off, because of the heat impact.
    You should also know that any background app may be allowed to steal cycles, simply because windows sees it as using a seperate core.
    So, yes HT causes more heat, and yes HT will slow framerates in game.
  16. Well.. that's interesting to know. (about the extra heat)

    I'm on a non-HT P4 northy. I've read that programs/games do need to be optimised to make better use of HT.

    On Quake 4 - ID claims their patch makes better use of HT. So a P4 with HT would gain suppositively, up to 25 percent in performance, then a non-HT P4.
  17. OK so does a better CPU or a better GPU make your games play better? And don't say both....


    g
  18. Yes, bothe have an impact.
    Lately we have seen a lot more advances in gfx than we have in cpus.
    As a result, we are seeing fewer cpu limited games than gfx limited games. If you have a chip that is 3 years old, you can still have a great gaming machine. Got a gfx card that's that old, go play solitaire.
    To have a serious kickbutt gamers rig, you have to have a newer cpu, and the newest gfx card.
    If you want eye candy, youv'e got to have the frames to give up for it.
  19. regarding this forum discution:
    HT helps only if the application is built for HT, otherwise the performance boost is insignificant...i feel you should keep it activated ....
    regarding other discutions:
    to keep this once it for all: you amd fans try a new intel cpu and you`ll be able to play your games even faster......don`t compare an opty with a celery
  20. actually i feel hyperthreading is better classed as a load balancer rather then performance booster or anything - when encoding and trying to play UT2004 without HT it packs down real bad, with HT on it plays much better but encoding will take a hit.
  21. Quote:
    I've read that programs/games do need to be optimised to make better use of HT.
    Individual programs need to be threaded to take advantage of thread level parellelism, sure, but the operating system already sees the world like this, and so the system as a whole can still benefit even while no particular program may as an individual.
  22. You can't really be in favor in just cpu or graphics card when it comes to gaming. As slower hardware would only bottleneck the faster ones. But as for most of the games that are coming today like BF2 and FEAR would basically need 2.5Ghs Intel or 2Ghz AMD but on the other hand taking more advantage on the graphics card for better quality and performance.
    At the end it really depends as most player are in favor of performance and other of quality.

    A pc that has no graphics card would still play games like pong. :D So that makes cpu better when it comes to gaming? :D Ok im just joking. :lol:
  23. Hyperthreading can run two threads at once, but gives half the CPU cache to each thread. So if the game is multithreaded it will probably run faster, but if it's single threaded it will probably run slower.
  24. Quote:
    Hyperthreading can run two threads at once, but gives half the CPU cache to each thread. So if the game is multithreaded it will probably run faster, but if it's single threaded it will probably run slower.
    Actually it doesn't. There is no 50/50 split. One thread can easily dominate cache activity.
  25. Quote:
    Hyperthreading can run two threads at once, but gives half the CPU cache to each thread. So if the game is multithreaded it will probably run faster, but if it's single threaded it will probably run slower.


    halves the cache? no it dont
  26. Gaming performance depends on the game itself. Some DX9 games perform much better on HT and dual-core systems than same generation OpenGL based ones. But in the end, all you have to do is enable/disable it and benchmark to see for yourself. Every game uses a different engine, so you can't really speak in general.
    Really soon, most games will be multi-threaded, VGA drivers are constantly improving as far as multithreading is concerned, so HT Pentiums and dual-core CPU's might benefit from that. If your system performs well in current 3D apps, then why worry?
  27. Merp..
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