Is QC Challenger II an ultralight?

Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

I posted a question or two about ultralights in an old thread, but as
it seems to be unraveled and spent, I'll try a new one.

I bought Bill Lyons' QC Challenger II after reading about Dallas'
journey, and because I wanted something slow with big windows. Some
questions:

1. Does the telltale string tell me anything I didn't already know from
the slip indicator on the dash?

I'm not planning on getting one, but if you want to add some more
instruments to this plane, check out today's new glass panel Palm Pilot
http://www.leftseatsimulations.com/palmefis.htm

2. More provocatively, is the QC Challenger II an ultralight? I ask
because I've been flying it (a) at night (b) over densely populated
areas. Both are forbidden for ultralights (FAR 103.11 and 103.15). But,
according to FAR 103.1, a powered ultralight "Is not capable of more
than 55 knots calibrated airspeed at full power in level flight." I've
been cruising at an indicated airspeed of between 65 and 85 miles per
hour, which comes out in knots to between 56 and 74 KIAS. So, do the
prohibitions apply? (Assuming that I trick out my plane with some kind
of appropriate lighting.)

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3 answers Last reply
More about challenger ultralight
  1. Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

    "David Wilson-Okamura"
    > 2. More provocatively, is the QC Challenger II an ultralight?

    Yup... the standard QC Challenger II is Ultralight.

    Your question is a good one in that the clipped wing version is capable of
    more than 55 knots calibrated airspeed at full power in level flight and it
    is equiped with nav lights.

    At that point I'd guess you need a PPL and I'd assume the aircraft would
    fall into a different category. Maybe boB, Peter or someone could shed some
    light on this.

    I'd also like to know if this webpage's information is out of date:
    http://members.tripod.com/~DragonFlight/3drpvt.html

    I'm pretty sure you have to possess at least a Sport Pilot licence to take
    anything up into the air?

    Dallas
  2. Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

    David Wilson-Okamura wrote:

    > I posted a question or two about ultralights in an old thread, but as
    > it seems to be unraveled and spent, I'll try a new one.
    >
    > I bought Bill Lyons' QC Challenger II after reading about Dallas'
    > journey, and because I wanted something slow with big windows. Some
    > questions:

    No, the Challenger II is not an Ultralight in the US. It's too heavy,
    too fast and has one too many seats. You would need to be an ultralight
    instructor OR have an FAA certification and the aircraft must be N
    numbered. A Sport Pilot license is all you need so you could be out
    flying your N numbered Challenger II in less than a week with no other
    requirements. Your drivers license is your medical.


    Here is a quote from USUA (United States Ultralight Association) FAQ at:
    http://www.usua.org/faq.htm

    ======================================================================
    Are 2-seat ultralights legal?

    You will need a regular FAA airman certificate (Recreational or Private
    Pilot) and the plane must be registered with FAA and have a federal
    airworthiness certificate (such as amateur-built experimental). The
    pilot will then be operating under general aviation rules (FAR Parts 61
    and 91). Dual training under Part 103 in a 2-seat ultralight is
    available through an FAA exemption.
    =====================================================================

    My Sprint II was a 2 seater and I had to have, stenciled on the frame,
    Training Only. Which meant anytime I was flying with another person I
    was instructing. And anytime I was solo, it was proficiency flying.

    Not to make this too long but here is another quote from the USUA FAQ page:

    =====================================================================
    What are ultralights and microlights?

    There are many classifications of "ultralights." The term, as it is used
    in the Federal Aviation Regulations, applies to any vehicle, powered or
    unpowered, which meets the definitions of FAR Part 103 (Ultralight
    Vehicles). The terms "ultralight" and "microlight" are used in many
    other countries to describe single and 2-seat planes flown primarily for
    fun.

    The terms include powered ultralights (fixed wing, rotorcraft, powered
    parachutes, etc.) and unpowered ultralights (hang gliders, paragliders,
    sailplanes, balloons, etc.). FAR Part 103 definitions restrict weight,
    speed, and fuel. The definitions currently apply only to single-seat
    craft, with exemptions for two-seat craft that are used for
    instructional purposes only.

    Generally, the terms "ultralight" and "microlight" identify any
    lightweight vehicle designed to operate at very low speeds. Therefore,
    many vehicles commonly referred to as ultralights or microlight cannot
    actually be operated under the special rules of FAR Part 103. To operate
    these aircraft you currently need either an FAA exemption for flight
    instruction or a federal airman certificate with a 3rd class medical.
    You also need a biennial flight review, plus aircraft registration, and
    an experimental airworthiness certificate For the Aircraft (see FAA Part
    61 and 91 or your local traditional flight school at the municipal
    airport).
    =====================================================================

    --

    boB,
    Master_Caution_70

    U.S. Army Aviation (retired)
    Central Texas - 5NM West of Gray Army Airfield (KGRK)
  3. Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

    James Hodson wrote:

    >
    >I can see some sort of competition coming on. It will be entitled
    >"What's the most inappropriate place you have ever landed?" and the
    >prize will be the Lawn Dart Trophy. The best newcomer will receive the
    >Melissa Medal.
    >
    >BTW, what's an Amsterdam Breakfast?
    >
    >James
    >


    James, have you ever thought about taking an Ultralight introduction
    flight?


    Just pick a calm day, too much wind and you might think it's uncontrollable


    --

    boB,
    Master_Caution_70

    U.S. Army Aviation (retired)
    Central Texas - 5NM West of Gray Army Airfield (KGRK)
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