Color ink out. Replace color ink cartridge. Press Enter to..

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

A few months ago, I purchased three HP 14 c5010a tri-color ink
cartridges and three black c5011a ink cartridges and placed them all in
service in an HP d145 officejet all-in-one printer on the same day
(rotating them in sequence).

Leaving just one of the HP14 black and tri-color cartridges in place,
I've been printing ever since (ever so sporadically as I prefer my B&W
HP laser printer).

Tonight, Christmas Eve, when trying to print the kid's cards for their
presents, I get the warning from the Hewlett Packard d145 printer:
"Color ink out. Replace color ink cartridge. Press Enter to continue."

Not to worry. I put the second color ink cartridge (never used except
that first day a few months ago). Guess what? Same message. Huh? How
can that be?

So, I put the third color ink cartridge in the HP d145 office jet.
Again. The same thing. Color ink out. Even though the ink was used a
few months ago for a single sheet of paper and the tape put back over
the holes and it was sealed in a baggie the whole time.

What is going on?
Can anyone explain this madness?
20 answers Last reply
More about color replace color cartridge press enter
  1. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers, comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    It's late on Christmas morning and nothing worked yet.
    What infernal logic has HP foisted upon us?

    Removing the battery didn't work (even after an hour).

    When I replaced the full OEM cartridge of HP ink, the printer said:
    Color in out. Replace color ink cartridge. Press Enter to continue.

    WHERE IS HP STORING this totally erroneous ink setting?
    How do we get this darn HP printer to accept its own ink?
    Are there any printer experts out there who can help?

    Help,
    Orak
  2. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    On 25 Dec 2004 00:33:06 -0800, "Orak Listalavostok"
    <oraklistal@yahoo.com> wrote:

    >So, I put the third color ink cartridge in the HP d145 office jet.
    >Again. The same thing. Color ink out. Even though the ink was used a
    >few months ago for a single sheet of paper and the tape put back over
    >the holes and it was sealed in a baggie the whole time.

    I just ran a search for you.
    See this article at http://hardware.mcse.ms/message36090-3.html
    Mayby you can remove the HP d145 battery for an hour.

    That battery is visible (with a flashlight) if you open the cover
    (like you do to replace the HP 14 ink cartridges).

    Look way left against the sidewall.
    A battery the size of a quarter is held in with a clip
    on a black plastic shell on a small brown circuit board.

    It's hard to get your head in there but I just tried and was
    able to remove the battery (with some difficulty) using just
    a large paper clip. I used the paper clip to pull back on the
    surprisingly long spring and then used my fingernail to pry
    the battery out at the 11 o'clock and 1 o'clock detents provided
    in the black plastic battery holder for this purpose.

    I was glad I previously pulled the plug as the batter fell
    down and I had to remove everything I could from the printer
    and then shake the d145 printer upside down to get the
    battery back.

    Use needlenose pliars or equivalent so you don't lose
    that battery like I did. One good thing came of shaking
    the printer in that a few shreds of crumpled paper fell out.
    I have no idea where *they* were hiding!
  3. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers,comp.sys.hp.hardware,rec.photo.digital,misc.consumers.frugal-living,comp.periphs (More info?)

    On Sat, 25 Dec 2004 09:15:06 GMT, Donna Michaelson
    <dmichaelson@NOSPAM.blockbuster.com> wrote:

    >Look way left against the sidewall.
    >A battery the size of a quarter is held in with a clip
    >on a black plastic shell on a small brown circuit board.

    I forgot to mention the battery was installed with the
    MINUS side down (toward the circuit board) with the
    PLUS side facing your head as you peek inside.

    For my HP OfficeJet d145 printer, it's the stock HP
    PANASONIC CR2032 3V battery (made in Indonesia).

    Now I've got to get wrapping my kids presents too!
    I hope you get your HP printer to behave before dawn.
    Good luck and Merry Christmas.

    Donna
  4. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers, comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    Actually, the wierdness doesn't have anything to do with "expired" ink.

    The inexplicable HP situation is why did all three HP14 tri-color
    ink cartridges say COLOR INK OUT (when 2 of 3 are chock full of
    HP OEM original ink filled at the HP factory in Singapore)?

    Further wierdness is why didn't, on Christmas eve, a battery
    removal reset the low-ink situation (the date on the D145 LCD
    display now says "Jan 00 00 00:00a" & it is not changing).

    More wierdness occurred this morning.
    I received a Christmas gift (of sorts) from HP.

    This morning, Christmas day, one of the new (completely full) HP14
    c5010a tri-color ink cartridges still said "Color ink out"; but,
    wierdly, the ORIGINAL cartridge now allowed printing (albeit with
    low cyan easily seen by the redness of the results)! Huh?

    How can this be?
    Can a printing expert explain this?

    Strangely, what got me full-quality printing again (at least for now)
    was immediately dripping a few ml of ink into each of the tri color
    felt sponges at the bottom of the HP14 c5010a ink tanks
    (done with the HP14 c5010a ink tanks upside down).

    Of course I had already tried this fill-'er-up remedy 12 hours ago;
    and it didn't work then; but it just worked now. What is going on?

    I suspect that the HP d145 burns the DATE into each HP14 c0150a
    tri-color ink cartridge at the TIME OF INITIAL INSTALLTION (which
    was the same for all three HP14 tri-colors). This, I suspect,
    CONFUSED the HP d145 printer who (I guess) thought all three
    were the SAME CARTRIDGE. That's all I can think of to explain
    why all three would show up as "COLOR INK OUT" when two were,
    in fact, totally full of HP ink and never used except for that
    first day put in service in October 2004.

    As for the original HP 14 c1050 cartridge now working, I cannot
    explain. I guess my hypothesis is that the one-hour cmos battery
    removal actually worked (but then why didn't it work for the
    other cartridge which was decidedly full of original HP ink)?

    It would be great for an HP expert (Bob Headrick?) to explain
    how this situation can possibly occur (as indeed it did).
    Orak Listalavostok
  5. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers,comp.sys.hp.hardware,rec.photo.digital,misc.consumers.frugal-living,comp.periphs (More info?)

    Donna Michaelson <dmichaelson@NOSPAM.blockbuster.com> wrote in
    news:t1dqs053fi12kf6tl8fk83vksuh43iu8dc@4ax.com:

    > On Sat, 25 Dec 2004 09:15:06 GMT, Donna Michaelson
    > <dmichaelson@NOSPAM.blockbuster.com> wrote:
    >
    >>Look way left against the sidewall.
    >>A battery the size of a quarter is held in with a clip
    >>on a black plastic shell on a small brown circuit board.
    >
    > I forgot to mention the battery was installed with the
    > MINUS side down (toward the circuit board) with the
    > PLUS side facing your head as you peek inside.
    >
    > For my HP OfficeJet d145 printer, it's the stock HP
    > PANASONIC CR2032 3V battery (made in Indonesia).
    >
    > Now I've got to get wrapping my kids presents too!
    > I hope you get your HP printer to behave before dawn.
    > Good luck and Merry Christmas.
    >
    > Donna
    >

    Maybe this will help.
    www.alotofthings.com/supportforrefillers/resettingthehpC5010A5011A.html

    Disabling or resetting the C5010A & C5011A ink Level Indicators.
    (HP #14 ink cartridges)


    Overriding the ink level gauge is a method developed by Hewlett Packard
    for those who wish to refill or use recycled ink jet cartridges.
    We recommend viewing your HP owners manual for your particular model to
    determine the best method for you particular model and firmware version.
    Information on disabling ink level gauge can be found either in your
    owners manual or can be downloaded from Hewlett Packard web site.
    (www.hp.com).
    For printer models not listed below please refer to your owners manual
    for disabling/overriding ink level gauge.

    Refilled ink cartridges:
    To install a refilled HP ink cartridge, you must override the Ink Level
    Gauge.


    HP INK JET MULTI-FUNCTIONS D125 / D135 / D145 / D155
    Overriding the Ink Level Gauge disables the printer’s ink level tracking
    feature, but allows you to use a refilled cartridge.

    Caution! If you use the override sequence described below, you will
    disable the Ink Level Gauge for your ink cartridge. If you choose to
    continue printing with an ink cartridge that has had its Ink Level Gauge
    disabled, you will not know when the cartridge is running low or empty.
    Printing with an empty cartridge may seriously damage your print heads.
    Damage that results from continued use of an ink cartridge with a
    disabled Ink Level Gauge is not the responsibility of Hewlett-Packard.
    Damage that results from the use of non-HP ink is not the responsibility
    of Hewlett-Packard.

    The Ink Level Gauge is automatically reset when a different ink cartridge
    is installed in the printer. Overriding the Ink Level Gauge does not
    affect ink cartridge expiration dates. The printer cannot use an expired
    ink cartridge.

    Follow these steps to override the Ink Level Gauge:
    To override the ink level gauge for the black ink cartridge
    1 On the keypad press LEFT ARROW and RIGHT ARROW at the same time, then
    release.
    2 On the keypad, press in order, 7, 8, 9.
    3 When the prompt appears asking if you want to override the ink level
    gauge, press 1 for Yes, or 2 for No.

    To override the ink level gauge for the tri-color ink cartridge
    1 On the keypad press LEFT ARROW and RIGHT ARROW at the same time, then
    release.
    2 On the keypad, press in order, 4, 5, 6.
    3 When the prompt appears asking if you want to override the ink level
    gauge, press 1 for Yes, or 2 for No.

    Always install an ink cartridge before performing an Ink Level Gauge
    override.

    To restore factory defaults
    You can restore the original factory settings to what they were when you
    purchased your HP OfficeJet. Choosing to restore your factory defaults
    restores all settings, except copy settings, speed-dial entries, date,
    and fax header information. You can perform this process from the front
    panel only.

    1 Press Menu.
    2 Press 7, then press 5. This selects the Status and Maintenance menu,
    then selects the Restore Factory Defaults option. The factory default
    settings are restored.
  6. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers,comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    I do believe some HP printers read cartridge dates, and may not print
    under conditions where the cartridge is beyond expiry date.

    However, I suspect it is only HP printers that have semi-permanent heads
    which are separate from the ink cartridge. Otherwise, it makes no
    real difference in operations, if the cartridge is too old or not, since
    if it is, the self contained head can't be "reused" nor is HP concerned
    about damage to it, since they don't wish you to refill the cartridge
    anyway, so I can't understand why they would have a head-contained
    cartridge have a fail-safe or time bomb built in.

    I would try very gently cleaning all the contacts for the cartridge on
    both the printer side and the cartridge itself, making sure any tape or
    adhesive residue is cleaned off. Then make sure the head/cartridge fits
    securely in place. Make sure you are following whatever procedures HP
    suggests for cartridge replacement in terms of the status of the printer
    when it is done.

    Again, hopefully, our friendly and helpful HP knowledgeable person will
    be back on this group soon to rescue you.

    Art

    Orak Listalavostok wrote:

    > It's late on Christmas morning and nothing worked yet.
    > What infernal logic has HP foisted upon us?
    >
    > Removing the battery didn't work (even after an hour).
    >
    > When I replaced the full OEM cartridge of HP ink, the printer said:
    > Color in out. Replace color ink cartridge. Press Enter to continue.
    >
    > WHERE IS HP STORING this totally erroneous ink setting?
    > How do we get this darn HP printer to accept its own ink?
    > Are there any printer experts out there who can help?
    >
    > Help,
    > Orak
    >
  7. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers, comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    Orak Listalavostok wrote:
    > The unexplained HP engineering is why did three HP14 c5010a ink
    > tanks (all of which were placed in service on the same date with
    > all but one of which were immediately removed from service) report
    > "COLOR INK OUT" (even when 2 of the 3 were full of HP OEM ink!)?

    .... twas the night before Christmas ... my HP ink level sank ...
    .... not a printer was printing ... nary one of 3 tanks ...

    The good news:
    - We're back printing beautifully (better than before) scores of prints
    - Using (strangely) the original HP14 c5010a tri-color cartridge
    - Which previously exhibited the correct "COLOR INK OUT" message!

    The bad news:
    - I have no idea what particular event "cleared" the HP "memory"

    The lessons learned:
    - Switching the three cartridges Dec 24 had no effect on COLOR INK OUT
    - Filling the one empty cartridge also had no effect on COLOR INK OUT
    - Removing the CR2032 3V CMOS battery had no immediate effect ...

    The day after:
    - Yet, about 12 hours later (on Christmas day)
    - The completely full cartridge was removed ...
    - And then replaced with the original empty cartridge ...

    And it printed without error!
    After subsequent refilling ... the original PRINTER INK OUT HP14
    tri-color ink cartridge is printing beautifully vibrant photos even
    after scores of sheets of paper (and multiple refills).

    I guess it's the first Christmas present from HP to all of us.
    I can't explain it; if you can - please do!

    Orak Listalavostok
  8. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    "Orak Listalavostok" <oraklistal@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:1103963586.150359.115680@c13g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
    >A few months ago, I purchased three HP 14 c5010a tri-color ink
    > cartridges and three black c5011a ink cartridges and placed them all in
    > service in an HP d145 officejet all-in-one printer on the same day
    > (rotating them in sequence).
    [snip]
    > What is going on?
    > Can anyone explain this madness?

    I cannot explain it. Why would *anyone* open six new cartridges and put them
    in a printer, only to immediately take four of them out and put them in a
    plastic bag for months? Regardless of the other issues it seems this is a bad
    idea as the cartridges will start to dry out.

    - Bob Headrick
  9. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers,comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    "Arthur Entlich" <artistic@telus.net> wrote in message
    news:Emfzd.21303$KO5.5701@clgrps13...

    >I do believe some HP printers read cartridge dates, and may not print under
    >conditions where the cartridge is beyond expiry date.
    >
    > However, I suspect it is only HP printers that have semi-permanent heads
    > which are separate from the ink cartridge. Otherwise, it makes no real
    > difference in operations, if the cartridge is too old or not, since if it is,
    > the self contained head can't be "reused" nor is HP concerned about damage to
    > it, since they don't wish you to refill the cartridge anyway, so I can't
    > understand why they would have a head-contained cartridge have a fail-safe or
    > time bomb built in.

    The D series all-in-one units use separate ink supplies and printheads. The
    failure to print with an empty ink supply is designed to prevent damage to the
    relatively long life printhead.

    - Bob Headrick
  10. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers,comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    "Orak Listalavostok" <oraklistal@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:1103996305.075419.17520@c13g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...

    > It would be great for an HP expert (Bob Headrick?) to explain
    > how this situation can possibly occur (as indeed it did).

    Sorry Orak, I am an expert in the integrated printhead side of the HP printer
    line, I only have a passing knowledge in the separate ink and silicon designs.
    I would expect that each supply would have a unique serial number, in addition
    to information stored in the ink cartridge about its installation date and
    expiration date. If the message had been that the cartridges had expired it
    would make more sense to me, but a message that they are out on ink is a puzzle
    to me.

    - Bob Headrick, not speaking for my employer HP
  11. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers,comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    In article <10sukqhfribf7a7@corp.supernews.com>, "Bob Headrick"
    <bobh@proaxis.com> wrote:
    >The D series all-in-one units use separate ink supplies and printheads. The
    >failure to print with an empty ink supply is designed to prevent damage to the
    >relatively long life printhead.

    Hi Bob,

    Whilst this may be true, the OP noted he refilled the original ink cartridge
    and he put two new originals which were (he said) "chock full" of ink so the
    print heads were never in danger.

    I had a similar problem when I saw the low ink message for a few sheets of
    paper. Then one sheet came out totally reddish and the next one refused to
    print. Geez. It sure runs out fast. The one sheet before was fine and the next
    was all red.

    When I put a new cartridge in, my HP Office Jet d series printer also said low
    ink. I was dumfounded. Being about fifty years old, I remember the good old
    tube-tv days, so I banged the sides of the printer with the palm of my hands.

    After a few of those persuasive hits, the low ink out message on my HP printer
    went away. I didn't even have to turn the printer off and remove the battery!

    It worked for me but only experts like you can explain why it worked.

    Tom
  12. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers,comp.sys.hp.hardware,rec.photo.digital,misc.consumers.frugal-living,comp.periphs (More info?)

    On Sun, 26 Dec 2004 16:07:18 -0800, Bob Headrick wrote:

    > "Orak Listalavostok" <oraklistal@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    > news:1103963586.150359.115680@c13g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
    >>A few months ago, I purchased three HP 14 c5010a tri-color ink
    >> cartridges and three black c5011a ink cartridges and placed them all in
    >> service in an HP d145 officejet all-in-one printer on the same day
    >> (rotating them in sequence).
    > [snip]
    >> What is going on?
    >> Can anyone explain this madness?
    >
    > I cannot explain it. Why would *anyone* open six new cartridges and put them
    > in a printer, only to immediately take four of them out and put them in a
    > plastic bag for months? Regardless of the other issues it seems this is a bad
    > idea as the cartridges will start to dry out.
    >
    > - Bob Headrick

    Bob,
    Regarding your seemingly valid question:
    Q: Why would anyone open four new cartridges and put them in an HP printer
    only to immediately take three of them out and put them in a plastic bag
    for months?

    I did it too. Unfortunately.
    Why would I do a crazy thing like that?
    I was actually following you (I think someone suggested it was your
    original) instructions.
    I will bet a lot of people who read usenet have followed suit.

    I just ran a quick google groups search but I couldn't find your original
    suggestion that cycling the HP ink cartridges reset the expiration date,
    but only after three (or was it two) had been cycled (due to HP memory).

    I just looked again on google groups (http://groups.google.com) and did a
    search. I didn't find the one where you suggested it (I think) but I did
    find this thread below which tells us to do this.

    Unfortunatly, it didn't work for me on my d135.
    I wonder if I should now use up all that ink somehow before it goes bad?

    Anyway, here is at least one article which tells us to cycle HP cartridges!
    ....

    Newsgroups: comp.periphs.printers,comp.sys.hp.hardware,rec.photo.digital,
    misc.consumers.frugal-living,comp.periphs
    From: tagato...@yahoo.com.sg (Toni Tagalario)
    Date: 11 Jul 2004 11:05:08 -0700
    Local: Sun, Jul 11 2004 11:05 am
    Subject: Re: HP OfficeJet 145 Black/color ink old. 8 days to expire.
    Printing will stop.

    > > Does anyone know if setting the printer date to the past will solve the
    > > users' problem? Is it easy or hard to set the printer date back a year?

    Two approaches will easily defeat almost any HP ink expiry date.
    1) Cycle 3 HP c501x ink cartridges (even epired cartridges work well).
    2) Remove the CMOS battery from the MPU board; short; reinstall.

    The first method entails momentarily replacing the existing expiring
    HP c5010 & c5011 officejet d145 ink cartridges with an existing ink
    cartridge (this second HP ink cartridge can be expired or not); then
    cycling the power on the Hewlett Packard Office Jet d145 all-in-one
    printer. Repeat with a third HP c5011 & c5010 ink cartridge (expired
    or not). Replace the original after the obligatory cycling of the
    power on the HP OfficeJet d145 all-in-one printer.

    That stuff about print heads being destroyed by running out of ink is
    pure unadulterated HP FUD (hey, he filled the ink - it never ran the
    ink dry so dry print heads is not of concern in this excellent ng
    thread).

    The second method entals repairing the HP Office Jet d145 printer by
    removing the restriction on date altogether. Simply disconnect the MPU
    board CMOS battery (just remove it from the clips momentarily); short
    the terminals of the MPU board battery connector (with the 120v power
    off, of course); then re-connect.

    The HP OfficeJet d145 boot-up sequence (which normally occurs only at
    the factory) will go through a series of questions such as:
    - What is the current date & time?
    (change it by a year or two but not three!)
    - How many sheets of paper for the B&W ink low-ink message?
    - How many sheets of paper for the color ink low-ink message?

    This proves HP is counting paper sheets - not ink drops or ink
    levels!.

    These methods have worked for thousands of successful HP printer
    homeowners to eliminate the Hewlett Packard illegal restriction on
    refilling HP printer ink cartridges. They will work for you too!
  13. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers,comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    I'm not an HP expert, and I certainly don't speak for the company, but I
    am suspecting a bad contact. I don't know how the cartridge informed
    the printer of its ink level, but there must be some sort of electronic
    contact somewhere in there between cartridge and printer.

    Art


    Tom Umbiak wrote:

    > In article <10sukqhfribf7a7@corp.supernews.com>, "Bob Headrick"
    > <bobh@proaxis.com> wrote:
    >
    >>The D series all-in-one units use separate ink supplies and printheads. The
    >>failure to print with an empty ink supply is designed to prevent damage to the
    >>relatively long life printhead.
    >
    >
    > Hi Bob,
    >
    > Whilst this may be true, the OP noted he refilled the original ink cartridge
    > and he put two new originals which were (he said) "chock full" of ink so the
    > print heads were never in danger.
    >
    > I had a similar problem when I saw the low ink message for a few sheets of
    > paper. Then one sheet came out totally reddish and the next one refused to
    > print. Geez. It sure runs out fast. The one sheet before was fine and the next
    > was all red.
    >
    > When I put a new cartridge in, my HP Office Jet d series printer also said low
    > ink. I was dumfounded. Being about fifty years old, I remember the good old
    > tube-tv days, so I banged the sides of the printer with the palm of my hands.
    >
    > After a few of those persuasive hits, the low ink out message on my HP printer
    > went away. I didn't even have to turn the printer off and remove the battery!
    >
    > It worked for me but only experts like you can explain why it worked.
    >
    > Tom
  14. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers,comp.sys.hp.hardware (More info?)

    "Tom Umbiak" <TomUmbiak@harvest.social.net> wrote in message
    news:db5Ad.4078$Y8.1841@newssvr17.news.prodigy.com...
    > In article <10sukqhfribf7a7@corp.supernews.com>, "Bob Headrick"
    > <bobh@proaxis.com> wrote:
    >>The D series all-in-one units use separate ink supplies and printheads. The
    >>failure to print with an empty ink supply is designed to prevent damage to
    >>the
    >>relatively long life printhead.
    >
    > Hi Bob,
    >
    > Whilst this may be true, the OP noted he refilled the original ink cartridge
    > and he put two new originals which were (he said) "chock full" of ink so the
    > print heads were never in danger.

    Yes, I believe the behavior described is a bug in the identification algorithm,
    perhaps caused by putting in the three cartridges in the same day. I was just
    pointing out that there is a valid reason for not printing if ink is low.

    - Bob Headrick
  15. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers,comp.sys.hp.hardware,rec.photo.digital,misc.consumers.frugal-living,comp.periphs (More info?)

    "Bill Williams" <bwilliams246@ieee.members.org> wrote in message
    news:1gzue3ltf4rl5$.1rsqfr09o5pnb.dlg@40tude.net...

    > I did it too. Unfortunately.
    > Why would I do a crazy thing like that?
    > I was actually following you (I think someone suggested it was your
    > original) instructions.
    > I will bet a lot of people who read usenet have followed suit.

    It was not my suggestion. I may have commented at times on other folks posting
    of this method. The method described works integrated printehad systems (all
    the DeskJet's and Photosmarts with ink level sensing), but it is not really
    necessary in those cases as those printers do not stop printing due to a low on
    ink signal. Anyone that claims that they had to do this to allow the printer
    to think it had ink so it would allow printing was mistaken.

    > I just ran a quick google groups search but I couldn't find your original
    > suggestion that cycling the HP ink cartridges reset the expiration date,
    > but only after three (or was it two) had been cycled (due to HP memory

    > I just looked again on google groups (http://groups.google.com) and did a
    > search. I didn't find the one where you suggested it (I think) but I did
    > find this thread below which tells us to do this.
    >
    > Unfortunatly, it didn't work for me on my d135.
    > I wonder if I should now use up all that ink somehow before it goes bad?
    >
    > Anyway, here is at least one article which tells us to cycle HP cartridges!

    The following contains a great deal of misinformation, starting with the
    suggestion to rotate the three cartridges in the D series. The discussion that
    "running the printheads dry is just FUD" is also total BS, as is the suggestion
    that the D series does its low on ink calculations based on counting pages
    rather than counting drops. Unfortunately it can be difficult on Usenet to
    tell truth from fiction as both can be presented convincingly.

    I hope that you contacted HP and they resolved your issue with the incorrectly
    identified cartridges.

    Regards,
    Bob Headrick, not speaking for my employer HP

    >
    > Newsgroups: comp.periphs.printers,comp.sys.hp.hardware,rec.photo.digital,
    > misc.consumers.frugal-living,comp.periphs
    > From: tagato...@yahoo.com.sg (Toni Tagalario)
    > Date: 11 Jul 2004 11:05:08 -0700
    > Local: Sun, Jul 11 2004 11:05 am
    > Subject: Re: HP OfficeJet 145 Black/color ink old. 8 days to expire.
    > Printing will stop.
  16. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers,comp.sys.hp.hardware,rec.photo.digital,misc.consumers.frugal-living,comp.periphs (More info?)

    "Olin K. McDaniel" <omcdaniel.abcd@mindspring.com> wrote in message
    news:41d2e947.2580078@news.east.earthlink.net...

    > My input probably does not apply, except for the sentence above. I
    > used an HP PhotoSmart P-1000 printer for a couple of years, and my
    > comments refer to its cartridges specifically. They the HP 45 and the
    > HP 78, neither of which have a date chip, as far as I know. However
    > when you run either one dry, and refill it, there is stored in memory
    > somewhere that cartridge identification number. So, even though
    > refilled it will keep on refusing to work.

    Your comments are true up to the last sentence. The Photosmart P100 (and all
    the DeskJet and Photosmart products with integrated printheads) do not refuse
    to work because a cartridge is empty. The printer would continue to signal
    the cartridge is low on ink, but this in no way would affect printing.

    - Bob Headrick, not speaking for my employer HP
  17. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers,comp.sys.hp.hardware,rec.photo.digital,misc.consumers.frugal-living,comp.periphs (More info?)

    On Thu, 30 Dec 2004 11:04:06 -0800, "Bob Headrick" <bobh@proaxis.com>
    wrote:

    >
    >"Olin K. McDaniel" <omcdaniel.abcd@mindspring.com> wrote in message
    >news:41d2e947.2580078@news.east.earthlink.net...
    >
    >> My input probably does not apply, except for the sentence above. I
    >> used an HP PhotoSmart P-1000 printer for a couple of years, and my
    >> comments refer to its cartridges specifically. They the HP 45 and the
    >> HP 78, neither of which have a date chip, as far as I know. However
    >> when you run either one dry, and refill it, there is stored in memory
    >> somewhere that cartridge identification number. So, even though
    >> refilled it will keep on refusing to work.
    >
    >Your comments are true up to the last sentence. The Photosmart P100 (and all
    >the DeskJet and Photosmart products with integrated printheads) do not refuse
    >to work because a cartridge is empty. The printer would continue to signal
    >the cartridge is low on ink, but this in no way would affect printing.
    >
    >- Bob Headrick, not speaking for my employer HP
    >

    On my Photosmart 7760, if you continue to print after the black
    cartridge indicates empty, the printer says it will switch to
    simulating black using the tricolor cartridge.
  18. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers,comp.sys.hp.hardware,rec.photo.digital,misc.consumers.frugal-living,comp.periphs (More info?)

    "Bob Ward" <bobward@verizon.net> wrote in message
    news:mrb9t09jvhqbo7490vvlrcb7thgtb3m929@4ax.com...

    > On my Photosmart 7760, if you continue to print after the black
    > cartridge indicates empty, the printer says it will switch to
    > simulating black using the tricolor cartridge.

    No, I think it will suggest that you are low on ink and may want to switch to
    reserve mode. It will not make the switch automatically, actually you will
    have to remove the low on ink cartridge to invoke reserve mode. If you leave
    the low cartridge in the printer you can print until the cartridge is empty and
    beyond.

    Regards,
    Bob Headrick, not speaking for my employer HP
  19. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers,comp.sys.hp.hardware,rec.photo.digital,misc.consumers.frugal-living,comp.periphs (More info?)

    Bob Headrick wrote:
    > "Olin K. McDaniel" <omcdaniel.abcd@mindspring.com> wrote in message
    > news:41d2e947.2580078@news.east.earthlink.net...
    >
    >
    >>My input probably does not apply, except for the sentence above. I
    >>used an HP PhotoSmart P-1000 printer for a couple of years, and my
    >>comments refer to its cartridges specifically. They the HP 45 and the
    >>HP 78, neither of which have a date chip, as far as I know. However
    >>when you run either one dry, and refill it, there is stored in memory
    >>somewhere that cartridge identification number. So, even though
    >>refilled it will keep on refusing to work.
    >
    >
    > Your comments are true up to the last sentence. The Photosmart P100 (and all
    > the DeskJet and Photosmart products with integrated printheads) do not refuse
    > to work because a cartridge is empty. The printer would continue to signal
    > the cartridge is low on ink, but this in no way would affect printing.
    >
    > - Bob Headrick, not speaking for my employer HP
    >
    >
    My HP DEskjet 930c starts sending messages when it senses that the ink is rnning low, but it keeps on printing, though the
    print quality may eventually degrade. But once the ink is all gone, it will not print.
  20. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers,comp.sys.hp.hardware,rec.photo.digital,misc.consumers.frugal-living,comp.periphs (More info?)

    "Marvin" <physchemNOSPAM@cloud9.net> wrote in message
    news:10tap01kbujphef@corp.supernews.com...

    > My HP DeskJet 930c starts sending messages when it senses that the ink is
    > running low, but it keeps on printing, though the print quality may
    > eventually degrade. But once the ink is all gone, it will not print.

    It will continue to go through the motions of printing, it is just that there
    will be no printing because there is no ink. The printer does not stop trying
    to print just because it thinks the ink is low. The Low On Ink indicator is a
    message for the user only, to alert them that the cartridge is running low and
    a replacement should be on hand.

    Regards,
    Bob Headrick
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