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Transferring a RAID0 Array to a new SATA chip

Tags:
  • Hard Drives
  • Western Digital
  • Chip
  • SATA
  • Storage
Last response: in Storage
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March 22, 2006 6:47:10 PM

So here's the problem. I have two WD Raptors of 36 Gb stripped in RAID0, on which there was my OS and some really important stuff. They're still running fine but my MB seems to be dead.

In case I need to change my mobo, how can I recover my Array without any data loss? Can I simply recreate the SATA set on the new MB? Note that I have no idea which block size I used when setting the RAID0... Is there some software that could help?

Thanks in advance for your help, I'd really like not to kill myself today already ^^

More about : transferring raid0 array sata chip

March 22, 2006 8:19:48 PM

Can't do it unless you have an identical or very similar RAID controller/chip.

What RAID solution were you using? NVRAID, Silicon Image, etc?
March 22, 2006 8:44:26 PM

It's on a MSI Neo4F Platinium which's featuring both but those two were on the NVRaid one. Let's imagine I get another NForce4 motherboard and use this same kind of chipset, it would work again even though I don't remember the cluster size? (but does the NVRaid interface even let you choose? I'm surprised I wouldn't remember making such a choice :/ )

And kinda off topic, is SATA and more particularly RAID0 such a stupid system it wouldn't allow whole arrays of disks to be moved from a box to another? :( 
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March 22, 2006 8:50:43 PM

Quote:
It's on a MSI Neo4F Platinium which's featuring both but those two were on the NVRaid one. Let's imagine I get another NForce4 motherboard and use this same kind of chipset, it would work again even though I don't remember the cluster size? (but does the NVRaid interface even let you choose? I'm surprised I wouldn't remember making such a choice :/ )

And kinda off topic, is SATA and more particularly RAID0 such a stupid system it wouldn't allow whole arrays of disks to be moved from a box to another? :( 


It has nothing really to do with SATA, its a RAID issue. And it is a charactersitic of RAID that it can only be transferred between like or very similar controllers, due to varying methods of implementation. You may get away with transferring a RAID 1 array, I've nver tried it.

BTW, for future reference, this is why I NEVER put anything important on a RAID 0 array without backing it up. I also usually avoid putting the OS on RAID 0 as well.
March 22, 2006 9:09:39 PM

I think you'll find the BIOS comes into it slightly with the nVraid, but if you shoot for another MSI Neo4F Plat then it *should* just pick it up as an existing Array

Even with the same nForce 4 chipset I wouldnt like to promise that it would work on, for example, an ASUS nForce 4 board.

This is why I am still using my Promise FASTtrak 100 TX4 - My RAID array is independant of my mobo (I've had this controller since my £2500 'cutting edge' Athlon XP 1900 / nVidia GeForce3 Ti500 rig :D  ), although I'm looking for a nice SATA RAID controller now... Hopefully an Areca
March 22, 2006 9:15:05 PM

Thanks for all your answers. So lesson's taken, I won't put anything valuable anymore on this RAID0. And I'll consider this independent controller solution aswell in the future, I always thought additional cards would reduce performance.

If you still have any ideas to help me, topic's still open, I'm crossing my finger for a magic solution as you read me :) 
March 23, 2006 11:59:12 AM

Actually,

Even if it had been a RAID 5 array you'd have trouble getting anything off it without the controller.

Its not so much that you used RAID0, its that you are dependant on the onboard controller.

Yes, controllers on add-in cards have a problem with the PCI bus becoming saturated, if you have alot of things on the PCI bus (normal max speed 133MB/s)

However, alot of the onboard cards actually sit on the PCI bus anyway (or PCI-E more and more these days which means no saturation) The nVraid system in the nForce 4 doesnt as its integrated into the chipset.

My card is running at 32bit/66MHz so it has a theoretical max bandwidth of 266MB/s, and my only other card is a SB Audigy on a separate bus so I'm not too bothered :) 
March 27, 2006 4:28:05 AM

Quick one then, I got another computer I'm gonna use while I'm waiting for my new mobo. It's featuring a whole another controller. Can I still use it to read my drives who were previously added as JBODs? I'm getting totally paranoid ;/
March 27, 2006 1:31:33 PM

You shouldn't have any problem reading JBODs
March 27, 2006 8:06:45 PM

Software JBODs yeah but some hardware JBODs are still controller specific. try plugging it in and see :) 
March 27, 2006 10:30:18 PM

Quote:
So here's the problem. I have two WD Raptors of 36 Gb stripped in RAID0, on which there was my OS and some really important stuff. They're still running fine but my MB seems to be dead.

In case I need to change my mobo, how can I recover my Array without any data loss? Can I simply recreate the SATA set on the new MB? Note that I have no idea which block size I used when setting the RAID0... Is there some software that could help?

Thanks in advance for your help, I'd really like not to kill myself today already ^^


The RAID metadata are written on one HDD. Since it was on an nforce4 motherboard, any nforce4 motherboard will pickup the array, and configure according to the RAID metadata written on the array and everything will be fine.

Other chipset/controller won't be able to pickup the array, as every coontroller has its own way of creating and identifying the array.
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