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PC in the freezer...is possible?

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March 26, 2006 1:21:38 PM

so...for a very extreme air cooling can i bench in a freezer with a pc?

More about : freezer

March 26, 2006 1:43:06 PM

I thought once about it :p 

an external HDD and dvd drive and passive cooling.

and voila one pc next to your cold beer :D 
March 26, 2006 1:47:56 PM

Quote:
so...for a very extreme air cooling can i bench in a freezer with a pc?



It should work. Or go to someplace cold like: North Pole, South Pole, Antartica, Siberia, Michigan, Minnesota :) .
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March 26, 2006 1:50:01 PM

Condensation would be the only problem with this, but to only benckmark shouldn't be for a short time.
March 26, 2006 1:54:52 PM

If you do it, please take some pictures and post them. I'd love to see that.
March 26, 2006 2:23:35 PM

Condensation occurs when something is colder than the ambient temperature. With a pc in your freezer, the pcb should be the same or slightly higher temperature than the air in the freezer, so you should not get condensation. Also, even if you did, the water would freeze, and I don't think ice conducts electricity. :) 

I remember reading an article somebody wrote about this, (they were doing it themself with an old freezer) but they broke the compressor or pipes or something so they couldnt finish it. :cry: 

If you could get hold of some non conductive liquid, like that stuff 3M makes that people were talking about in a submerged pc topic, you could put the pc in that, and chill it with the freezer. More efficient than just chilled air. :D 
March 26, 2006 3:16:48 PM



...
March 26, 2006 7:04:43 PM

oh my god,


it will NOT work, why?

okay, first of all, the freezer's compressor isn't designed to withstand a constant heat source. the purpose of a freezer is to cool things down and keep it at that temperature. it is not meant to go through the heat and cool cycle constantly.

the result will be a lot of hot air will congregate in teh freezer and u'll either eventually burn out the freezer's compressor or overheat your computer

be a man and use real phase change
March 26, 2006 7:13:15 PM

I like it, btw, Mozzartusm did a similar project using a deep freezer for his Prescot.
March 26, 2006 7:14:12 PM

Quote:
"]oh my god,


it will NOT work, why?

okay, first of all, the freezer's compressor isn't designed to withstand a constant heat source. the purpose of a freezer is to cool things down and keep it at that temperature. it is not meant to go through the heat and cool cycle constantly.

the result will be a lot of hot air will congregate in teh freezer and u'll either eventually burn out the freezer's compressor or overheat your computer

be a man and use real phase change



:roll: :roll:



...
March 26, 2006 7:15:16 PM

[/list]
March 26, 2006 7:16:50 PM

Quote:
"]oh my god,


it will NOT work, why?

okay, first of all, the freezer's compressor isn't designed to withstand a constant heat source. the purpose of a freezer is to cool things down and keep it at that temperature. it is not meant to go through the heat and cool cycle constantly.

the result will be a lot of hot air will congregate in teh freezer and u'll either eventually burn out the freezer's compressor or overheat your computer

be a man and use real phase change



:roll: :roll:



...


NICE.
March 26, 2006 7:42:55 PM

Quote:
"]oh my god,


it will NOT work, why?


FALSE.

Quote:

okay, first of all, the freezer's compressor isn't designed to withstand a constant heat source. the purpose of a freezer is to cool things down and keep it at that temperature. it is not meant to go through the heat and cool cycle constantly.


True a freezer was designed to pull heat and drop temp to a freezing point below 32F or 0c whichever you prefer. If there was that much heat generated the freezer would likely never satisfy the thermostat in the freezer and it would keep running.

Quote:

the result will be a lot of hot air will congregate in teh freezer and u'll either eventually burn out the freezer's compressor or overheat your computer
be a man and use real phase change


yes hot air from the computer will congregate in the freezer that is removed by the evaporator. The problem would be in the event of a defrost cycle where the compressor shuts off and heat is applied to the evaporator to defrost the ice, this typically doesn't take to long in the freezers of today and the box would have to be checked during this time to make sure that temp spikes are not occuring.

As far as burning out a compressor that is complete non-sense. Putting a load on a compressor is not going to burn it up any faster than just using it normally. The compressor is not worked any harder when it runs normally nor if it's under a heavy load. It's either running or not, so there is not any additional wear to the compressor just because a heavy load is on it.

The guy that posted a pic of the water bottles and fan pointed at the condenser of the freezer has got the right idea. It will work provided you take the steps needed to make it work.

Condensation could be a problem during the defrost cycle or ice forming on any of the cards, it could cause a short circuit.
March 26, 2006 7:49:44 PM

tell me your specs and try to leave the comp in there for a couple of hours


if it still works, you have a hell of a freezer
March 27, 2006 4:23:29 AM

Quote:
"]tell me your specs and try to leave the comp in there for a couple of hours


if it still works, you have a hell of a freezer


look the coil...there is the ice for most power of the freezer.
March 28, 2006 12:39:27 AM

What he said and more... The frig will acctually last longer running all the time as there is less load over time on it then haveing it start and stop all the time. The most ware and tear is when it starts up. Uses less enegy ect. The key is over time.
March 28, 2006 1:23:19 AM

that is only assuming the fridge can take the heat load, which i doubt it can. when that happens, there is no ventilation in teh fridge and the hot air will rise the overall temperature of the computer
March 28, 2006 12:32:59 PM

Quote:
"]that is only assuming the fridge can take the heat load, which i doubt it can. when that happens, there is no ventilation in teh fridge and the hot air will rise the overall temperature of the computer


Uh, add a fan to the door of the fridge? </joke>

Well, a temporary solution to that might be to put a small fan inside the freezer to keep the air moving. It'll be the same air, but at least it won't just be sitting there,

What kind of machine do you have? See how much you can overclock it!
November 20, 2008 10:28:29 PM

thinking of maybe doing that but with a mini freezer in my room
a c 86 K Overclocking
November 21, 2008 11:28:39 AM

Look at the watts a PC uses. Use about 80% of the PC watts as your heat value. Use the fridge at 30% of watts used for power vs how much it cools, got that from a older post on another forum from an experianced phase change builder.

A full sized fridge might work, but a mini fridge, no way.

And fridge compressors aren't meant to run 24/7 for sure, don't care what anyone says.
November 21, 2008 1:23:17 PM

what is this nonsense about hot air in the freezer? Have you kids never heard of convective heat transfer? It'd be like an oven, except reverse...So not like an oven at all :p 

What I'm trying to say is that the hot air will rise but that will push cold air back under it. It'll cycle around and take care of itself with natural convection.
May 26, 2011 7:46:52 PM

I think this can be done. But seems to me everyone has the wrong idea. I have been thinking about this alot lately, which is what led me to this discussion. First, you need to go with liquid cooling. I want to "freeze" my processor and two GTX 285 graphic cards. My computer freezes and crashes enough to be extremely annoying while gaming with my video settings set for 1920x1080 resolution and all other settings as high as my equipment will handle. This causes the processor and video cards to work hard. I currently turn all fans on high, and still hit 145F, which is the point that my computer freezes. Ok, so here's my idea. I have a small fridge that I keep full of soda, with my vodka (no beer allowed!) in the freezer section. I want to build a box that will fit in the freezer section and either put a small radiator in at or coil some copper tubing up. I could then fill the box with water and freeze it. I will have to drill two holes from the back of the fridge into the freezer compartment for the intake and output lines from the computer tower. In between the two I obviously need an inline pump, reservoir and flow indicator. That is the basic idea. Expensive? Yes. I figure I can build a quality, sweet ass cooling system for around 600 dollars for everything-including CPU and VGA water blocks. With this configuration, since the radiator will be frozen in ice at all times in the freezer, the additional load put on the refrigeration system would be minimul, similar to putting a warm twelver in the fridge-the equivilent of a long hardcore all night gaming session. I need to remember to room for my vodka in the freezer though! Any other thoughts or ideas on this? I think it is very possible feasable. ;) 
a c 324 K Overclocking
May 26, 2011 8:31:22 PM

First of all, you resurrected a thread that has been dormant for almost 3 years. Much of the information contained in here is incredibly outdated except for one...no, a freezer will not work for this unless you own a very large industrial freezer used in supermarkets, etc. This includes both a PC that is air cooled as well as any combination of watercooling, radiators inside, outside, both, etc. Freezers and refrigerators ARE NOT designed as a constant cooling device...they remove heat watts once and keep the temp there. A PC constantly is pumping out how many 100's of watts as it is on? Compressor will overheat, seize or simply fail.

I have this link in the watercooling sticky because it has been asked 1000's of times. There is a lot of scientific data presented in there.
http://www.overclock.net/faqs/105345-info-fridge-pc-cooler.html

Please open a new thread for new discussions or that pertain more relative to current hardware and time frames.
a c 100 K Overclocking
May 26, 2011 8:42:43 PM

It would work for short term benchmarking though... but anyway... I did see a post on another forum (no idea where to find it now though) where this guy built an absolute monster gaming PC. He had 4 6970s IIRC. Anyway he used an air conditioner unit and custom modified it for sub zero PC cooling. It was awesome.
a c 324 K Overclocking
May 26, 2011 8:44:54 PM

You can use a compressor to chill water this way better than using a fridge/freezer to simply cool. There is a guy over on OCN that is running a setup like this and a budget of about $11,000 to date. Of course it can be done much cheaper, but the dude has cash to burn.
a b K Overclocking
May 26, 2011 8:57:23 PM

it won't work..it'll crack
November 3, 2011 7:45:52 PM

I Have my Computer in a Cooler i have made it works great with no condensation. The Cpu is Water cooled with a water chiller. My Cpu Temps are around 55F MAX. My case is cooled with a compressor. My Computer temps never rise above 65F. My videocard GTX 260 OC. Runs around 80F. Putting a pc in a freezer is possible if you know what your doing.

Email For Pictures.
a c 100 K Overclocking
November 3, 2011 10:57:59 PM

That's actually higher temps than my PC, but I'm sure we have different hardware which might explain.
November 3, 2011 11:46:33 PM

Mines in degrees fahrenheit
a c 100 K Overclocking
November 4, 2011 12:53:57 AM

Oh. Right. Well that's pretty cool then. But you're not just letting it sit in the freezer right?
a c 324 K Overclocking
November 4, 2011 3:40:10 PM

Closing this thread.

Coolermaster- this is the second necro thread you have posted on today...what gives? Please open a new thread if you want to discuss. Most of these threads are several months or even years old.
!