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Current video cards won't support HD Video in Vista

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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Anonymous
April 3, 2006 3:42:23 AM

I just came upon this article and thought that some of you might be interested.

http://www.firingsquad.com/hardware/ati_nvidia_hdcp_support/

The first line of the article is copied below. I guess most of the monitors out there will also not be fully functional with Vista either.


You want to know a secret? None of the current ATI or NVIDIA graphics cards will support the full capabilities of Windows Vista.
Anonymous
April 3, 2006 4:11:55 AM

Here's an article about HDCP and monitors. Plan your monitor upgrades carefully if you will want to watch HD video on your rig!
Windows Vista Ready LCD Round-Up
April 3, 2006 5:05:32 AM

Old. Anyways all of the studios except warner bros arent enabling ICT so its a non issue.
Related resources
Anonymous
April 3, 2006 2:37:01 PM

Quote:
so its a non issue


Well it is not a non issue for me! I like to watch DVDs on my computer and I keep my hardware for a long time before upgrading. I was thinking about a new computer build this summer with a new wide screen monitor. If HDCP compliant hardware is not readily available I will just wait.

Perhaps some of the major studios have stated that they will not be enabling ICT initially but we have no guarantee that they will not enable ICT a few years down the road. Also, if only one, or a handful, of studios is enabling ICT that is enough reduced functionality to be unacceptable to me.
April 3, 2006 3:53:15 PM

this is getting better and better everyday if you just wanto to use the new software you'll have to by a new computer a hole new computer , is the processor it's the memory that isn't enough its the graphic cards wicha aren't complain't the monitors that don't support it, we are dommed all because a bunch of producers just don't make thing work properly and are always inovative but we are the ones speending the money:S
April 3, 2006 4:32:35 PM

You can thank the music industry for making the movie studios paranoid. This crap all started with them. With DVD there was just a simple encryption scheme. Granted it was broken rather quickly. To me all anti-piracy crap should stay in the device reading the disc. It shouldn't translate down to the GPU and the monitor. Thats just asking for people to get pissed off. What if you have an LCD monitor that doesn't support it? You get screwed just because you can't afford to upgrade.

For me, I don't really care because I don't watch movies on my computer. Only thing I watch off my computer is TV shows.
April 3, 2006 4:45:26 PM

umm as action man said. NON ISSUE

the problem was companies were planning on using ICT technology. if you weren't using 100% compliant devices, your display would be dropped to 540 scan lines.

the companies have dumped this idea. they've decided regardless of the type of display it should be able to do 1080p. so now that they won't be dumbing down the display even on non compliant hardware..

whats the penalty for it? whats the use of the HDCP?
Anonymous
April 3, 2006 4:57:47 PM

Quote:
umm as action man said. NON ISSUE


Great, this is not an issue for you or the action man. It still remains an issue for me, and perhaps for other people as well. Maybe ICT will fade away or maybe all of the studios will implement it in a year or two - who knows.

Here is a link to an article that discusses inital use of ICT. It appears that Warner Brothers will use ICT on some of their titles immediately, and that the rest of the studios could choose to use ICT at a later date.

Universal Nixes ICT
a b U Graphics card
April 3, 2006 5:02:18 PM

Quote:

Well it is not a non issue for me!


Then WTF didn't you learn about this 2 months ago like the rest of us who care about it. Read what Action Man said, and absorb it instead of your delayed knee jerk reaction to old news! :roll:

Quote:
I like to watch DVDs on my computer and I keep my hardware for a long time before upgrading. I was thinking about a new computer build this summer with a new wide screen monitor. If HDCP compliant hardware is not readily available I will just wait.


This is no different than if they made DX10 necessary foir Vista. BTW you can still watch the movies, even if they were DRMed to death, just at DVD quality.

Quote:
Perhaps some of the major studios have stated that they will not be enabling ICT initially but we have no guarantee that they will not enable ICT a few years down the road.


And at that time you should be able to figure out how to scrounge together the $50 for a new card if it means that much to you. Seriously chink-little do some research and stop running around with your head cut-off. Vista's not even on the radar this year, so you have time to figure out your next purchase.

Quote:
Also, if only one, or a handful, of studios is enabling ICT that is enough reduced functionality to be unacceptable to me.


Well then complain to them, not to us. We've already discussed this issue, and most of us have adapted to the various scenarios.
IMO, you need to log-off sit-back and relax a bit, and figure yourself out. If it's so important to you get the Sony VAIO with HDCP/HDMI support, or contact Sapphire, MSI, and a few others and get an X1300 or GF6200 with HDCP support. Do soe research and stop worrying abot something even Sony has dropped from their PS3 (there's a major studio for you).
a b U Graphics card
April 3, 2006 5:09:04 PM

Quote:
With DVD there was just a simple encryption scheme. Granted it was broken rather quickly.


Try before implementation date.

Quote:
To me all anti-piracy crap should stay in the device reading the disc. It shouldn't translate down to the GPU and the monitor.


That won't work if you can capture the data stream, just look at all the capture programs that let you record protected web-casts.

Quote:
What if you have an LCD monitor that doesn't support it? You get screwed just because you can't afford to upgrade.


If you can't afford an upgrade I doubt you can afford the BR or HD-DVD disks to begin with, and you'll have to be happy with line-double DVD quality.

Quote:
For me, I don't really care because I don't watch movies on my computer. Only thing I watch off my computer is TV shows.


And that's the question, should the computer makes be making things for the movie industry or should they focus on the computer end of things? I am dissapointed that the HDCP support mentioned was only at the chip level, but it's not life/death, I will plan my upgrades around what amounts to just another speed-bump in the technology landscape. Of course for me it's a little harder than the original poster because I'm looking for a laptop solution, and no one sells those right now (soon though).
April 3, 2006 5:30:22 PM

Quote:
With DVD there was just a simple encryption scheme. Granted it was broken rather quickly.


Try before implementation date.

Heheh, yeah.

Does anyone here think that they won't be able to crack HDCP? It might be difficult, but it's probably just a matter of time...
April 3, 2006 5:35:17 PM

The players aren't always going to be that expensive. So some people might have the same monitor 2 years from now when they're mainstream.

Personally I don't see either one taking off with the uncertainity about the formats.
a b U Graphics card
April 3, 2006 5:47:15 PM

Quote:

Does anyone here think that they won't be able to crack HDCP? It might be difficult, but it's probably just a matter of time...


I' certain they'll be able to do it, but it will likely be alot harder than MacroVision, etc.

I've had the 'displeasure' of working with some equipment that also is HDCP compliant on the base level (micro panels) and in order to enable it you need to send away for secondary components and for the developer kit and a whole whack of crap. Everyone now is building support into their packages at the chip level (I see it everywhere) but the whole hand-shake component is too much of a hassle except for people who KNOW that their end-users will pay extra for it. It's not just the added hardware and software costs, the extra labour of familiarizing yourself with the stuff isn't hceap either. So the comment in the articles adbout the $10,000 licensing fees, is just the tip of the iceberg. I have a feeling that for companies like ATi and nV the costs would be closer to 10-50 times that much when all is said and done, and for people who wouldn't have known anything about the issue until they read articles like the one above it doesn't matter. Some of us discussed this way way back with the DELL WS panels, but if people didn't get concerned then, their complaints now ring to me like 'Well where the F**K were you when this all started and we could do more about it by voicing displeasure to M$ and Intel !?!?! :x

Anywhoo, to make a long story short, I don't doubt it'll be cracked within months of widespread use of BR/HD-DVD and Vist being launched. However I wouldn't be surprised if it involves some hardware implementation before they can strip it from the software. (same way we had Macrovision disabling video stabilizers long before the software removal tools were widely available. So it'll likely be another staggered cracking/hacking/liberating/empowering stuggle that will take longer than we'd like but far sooner than the powers that be had expected.
a b U Graphics card
April 3, 2006 5:52:22 PM

Quote:
The players aren't always going to be that expensive.


But they aren't going to be cheap until long after the cards and monitors are. And I wasn't just talking about hardware I was actually focusing on the disks themselves, which will be significantly more expensive than DVD, and if CD and DVD are any example will likely remain more expensive for quite some time during their lifespan.

Quote:
So some people might have the same monitor 2 years from now when they're mainstream.


But those aren't the people who're going to be spending $500+ for their initial player, and $40-50+ per disk. Those people will buy whatever it takes, just like I spent $400+ on one of the first Proscan DVD players.

Quote:
Personally I don't see either one taking off with the uncertainity about the formats.


I think the format war is overblown. The Hardware MFR have learned from the DVD fiasco, and just like LG, Samsung and a few others have said they will make players that support both in both computer and stand-alone models, so format is irrelevant IMO.
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