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First time installing a processor...

Last response: in CPUs
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April 5, 2006 9:35:26 PM

I just got an Athlon 64 3000+ (the one that comes in a box with a fan). I installed the processor and fan correctly, but then I was curious about something. So, I removed the Fan from the processor, and then it hit me that maybe that wasn't a good idea and I put it back on. I read the manual to find that it says if the heatsink is removed after initial installation, the thermal compound needs to be reapplied. Since I figured everything I needed would come in the box, I didn't order any thermal stuff. So my questions are...

1. Do I need to reapply the thermal stuff before I fire up my system?

2. If I do, what exactly do I need to buy? (a product from Newegg's site would be nice)

3. Where is a good place to find good, simple, and clear directions on how to apply thermal stuff?

4. What should I call this "thermal stuff" so I don't sound stupid.

5. Anything else I should know or you would like to share with me about this would be nice.
April 5, 2006 9:40:54 PM

1. You should re-apply some compound (thermal stuff)

2. Arctic Silver 5 is the best stuff you can get. Yes, you can get it on newegg.

3. Ask here, it should also be in the directions, but sometimes directions from the manufacturer can be vague.

4. Thermal compound, you aren't stupid

5. Depending on what kit you get, it should come with everything you need. Don't use a lot, half of a grain of rice on the cpu and spread it with the heatsink or a credit card. DO NOT TOUCH IT WITH YOUR HANDS, IT IS A POISON. Anything else just ask.
April 5, 2006 9:46:16 PM

1) If you only removed the FAN (not the heatsink) then no. If you have not powered up the PC at all yet (so it hasn't gotten warm), then no. If you have, then yes, replacing it is the best idea.

2) AS5 - umm, what Caboose said :) 

3) AS5 should come with instructions, and the AS5 website does too.

4) 'thermal stuff' is used a lot... but 'Thermal paste', thermal compound, TIM (thermal interface material), but not thermal glue or thermal adhesive (that stuff is glue - not what you want in this case)

5) In addition to Caboose's warning - don't touch it with your fingers! - the oils on your hands can interfere with the heat transfer.

Mike.
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April 5, 2006 9:48:46 PM

Quote:
1) If you only removed the FAN (not the heatsink) then no. If you have not powered up the PC at all yet (so it hasn't gotten warm), then no. If you have, then yes, replacing it is the best idea.
Mike.
Yes if only that happened he doesn't need to replace it, but chances are he should put AC5 on there anyways to replace the factory cheap white goo.
April 5, 2006 9:56:26 PM

Quote:
1) If you only removed the FAN (not the heatsink) then no. If you have not powered up the PC at all yet (so it hasn't gotten warm), then no. If you have, then yes, replacing it is the best idea.
Mike.
Yes if only that happened he doesn't need to replace it, but chances are he should put AC5 on there anyways to replace the factory cheap white goo.
No argument here :) 

OP: Also be sure to clean off the old stuff first - completely...

Mike.
April 5, 2006 10:06:26 PM

Ne wayz replacing stock thermal compund is a good idea. Apply Arctic Silver 5, it may be a little$$, but its worth it. while your at it get a good heatsink to go woth that, stock heatsinks arent great on cooling, so invest, It will last your processor a long time, it will keep it very cool as well.
A cool processor, is a happy processor.
-Good Luck- :wink:
April 5, 2006 10:55:14 PM

Quote:
Make sure you get the previous thermal compound off completely with alcohol.
Not only that but pure isopropyl alcohol (not a fifth of Wild Turkey :D  )
April 5, 2006 11:06:47 PM

The stuff that is on your heatsink from the factory is not really a thermal compound like you would buy in a tube, but a "heatpad" that is a waxy substance (solid at room temperature) and when the CPU heats up, the heatpad melts and fills in the pores and irregularities of the mating metal surfaces to provide good heat transfer.

If all you did was put the heat sink on and then take it off without running the system, then it is still fine. Oh, and the stock heatpad on the stock heatsink is fine to use. AMD built the CPU and they are the ones that have to pony up if it dies within the 3 year warranty period; and they are the ones that packed the heatsink in the box with that heatpad on it.

I am running my 3700+ with the stock heatpad and it idles at 22 - 24° C according to Asus Probe II, and 28° C according to the BIOS, in a Chenming 601 case with only 2 of the 80mm fans installed (one intake and one exhaust). That's a lot cooler than my old Athlon 1800+ ran (38 - 40° C at idle in the same case) and I used that for 4, almost 5 years and retired it in still working condition (that had Arctic Silver BTW).
April 5, 2006 11:14:48 PM

Well that is certainly arguable.........I have heard that as ceramique is nice as well? Doesn't as5 dry out overtime? I heard this I'm not sure. Ceramique gets better after it drys?
April 6, 2006 12:07:50 AM

Quote:
Well that is certainly arguable.........I have heard that as ceramique is nice as well? Doesn't as5 dry out overtime? I heard this I'm not sure. Ceramique gets better after it drys?
Arctic Silver doesn't dry out(within a reasonable timeframe)
April 6, 2006 12:26:29 AM

Quote:
Thermal compund=heatpad(thermal pad)
Thermal compund=thermal paste/grease

Go find the definition of 'compound' in dictionary.

Quote:
The stuff that is on your heatsink from the factory is not really a thermal compound like you would buy in a tube

Does the bolding help?
April 6, 2006 12:44:38 AM

Quote:
Heatpad is a form thermal compund.

Does the bolding help?

No it doesn't because thermal compound don't necessary come in a tube.
Some thermal compound come in liquid.
That doesn't change the fact that the thermal pads on a new heatsink are not like a thermal compound that you would buy in a tube, unless you know of any solid-at-room-temperature waxy substances that come in tubes.
April 6, 2006 1:29:03 AM

Quote:
Make sure you get the previous thermal compound off completely with alcohol.


Not licking?
April 6, 2006 3:43:59 AM

Quote:
Get your naming right.
I didn't "name" anything.
Quote:
The ones that comes in tube are called 'thermal paste'.
Arctic Silver is the most prominent brand of thermal compound in this field and they call it "thermal compound":
Quote:
Application Instructions for Premium Silver Thermal Compound
Arctic Silver, Arctic Silver II, Arctic Silver 3 and Arctic Silver 5.

http://www.arcticsilver.com/arctic_silver_instructions.htm

They also distinguish between a thermal pad and thermal compound:
Quote:
ONLY Arctic Silver thermal compound should be between the processor core and the heatsink. Remove any thermal pads or other interface material from the heatsink before applying the Arctic Silver. Thermal pads can be scraped off with a plastic tool that will not scratch the bottom then the remnants can be removed with a xylene based cleaner, (Goof Off and some carburetor cleaners) acetone, mineral spirits, or high-purity isopropyl alcohol.

When it comes to naming conventions, between some guy on a forum and the manufacturers of Arctic Silver, well, let's just say that they win, and you lose, you know, by default.
April 6, 2006 4:00:57 AM

I know this sounds odd, but the best thing I've found for removing Artic Silver 5 (and similar thermal compounds) from a cpu and heatsink is:
Oak-N-Ivy brand Technu outdoor skin cleanser.
Technu is marketed as a product that "removes poison oak and ivy oils that cause rash and itching."
I have to keep this stuff around the house because of the poison oak in the nearby woods.
Main ingredient is deoderized mineral spirits.
One drop on the cpu or heatsink, swish it around with a cotton swab, it just instantly dissolves the thermal compound.
Then I follow up with rubbing alcohol to remove the rest of the residue until the metal is shiny.
April 6, 2006 4:15:45 AM

Quote:
1) If you only removed the FAN (not the heatsink) then no. If you have not powered up the PC at all yet (so it hasn't gotten warm), then no. If you have, then yes, replacing it is the best idea.


Concur...and only if the factory thermal compound is still in place (not torn or missing). :wink:
April 6, 2006 4:19:35 AM

Quote:
What they said is exactly right.
Which makes what you say wrong.
Quote:
Artic Silver is a thermal paste that comes under the thermal compound naming.
They use the word "paste" in only one context on their entire site, and it is not in reference to their own product. If "paste" is the more specific and accurate term, then you can be sure that they would use it. I trust that they know what to call their own products, more than I trust that you know what to call their products.
Quote:
Thermal pad also comes under the thermal compound naming as well.
Thermal pads are typically called...thermal pads, you know, to distinguish them from thermal compound like Arctic Silver, which is typically called...thermal compound. See the Arctic Silver page that I linked to for some tips on English language common-speak.
Quote:
The stuff that is on your heatsink from the factory is not really a thermal compound

You're dead wrongLOL. Deja vu? Here goes again:
Quote:
The stuff that is on your heatsink from the factory is not really a thermal compound like you would buy in a tube

Does the bolding help?
April 6, 2006 4:53:31 AM

omg u can put it back on =/




i did that with mine and it works fine


but i do need another heatsink , the stock one look funny
April 6, 2006 12:19:10 PM

I can't believe you CHILDREN are arguing over the somantics of a non-technical term like thermal 'stuff'...

:roll: :roll: :roll:
April 6, 2006 12:22:02 PM

Hey fishman Why don't ya teach the lil'kids a lesson. Take a Frozen Trout And smash them until The fish breaks or they start bleeding to death.
April 6, 2006 2:07:37 PM

I can't do that, it would be fratricide. (killing the Trout)

Now if I had a Salmon or a Tuna, I wouldn't mind so much...

Mike.
April 6, 2006 5:10:08 PM

Quote:
Dictionary speaks English language
A dictionary contains definitions. By using a dictionary you can also say that "The stuff that helps heat transfer from the heat spreader on the CPU to the heat sink" = correct, which it is, but that doesn't tell us much about proper terminology. According to the dictionary, here are a few words that would apply - "stuff", "matter", "substance", etc. What does that tell us about common usage pertaining to thermal pads and thermal compounds? Not much.
Quote:
Actic Silver doesn't.
Oh no? What language are they speaking then?
Quote:
Actic Silver is just a company, they don't own any rights to define names for products they don't own.
Language is defined through usage. The top manufacturer of the "stuff" in question holds more credibility regarding usage than you do. They, like most other people, make a distinction between "thermal compound" and "thermal pad" when writing about the "stuff". They don't call their products "thermal paste" at all, but regardless of that, feel free to call it thermal paste, but be advised that, whether you choose to call it thermal paste or thermal compound, in the real world, a distinction is made between thermal compound/paste and thermal pads.
Quote:
Just admit it, it's a thermal compound. Nothing beat a dictionary.
Nothing beats a dictionary huh? How's this? You are using the dictionary for the wrong application. To establish real world language usage, you look to real world language usage. Also, by continually quoting me out of context (intentionally leaving out the like you would buy in a tube part), even after I have pointed out your error more than once now = you are a dishonest debater. Let me steal a page from your book for a minute:
Quote:
Actic Silver is just a company, they don't own any rights to define names for products
So you are saying that they don't own the rights to define names for their own products? "You are dead wrong."

LOL
April 7, 2006 12:05:36 AM

Quote:
Heatpad is a form thermal compund.

Does the bolding help?

No it doesn't because thermal compound don't necessary come in a tube.
Some thermal compound come in liquid.
That doesn't change the fact that the thermal pads on a new heatsink are not like a thermal compound that you would buy in a tube, unless you know of any solid-at-room-temperature waxy substances that come in tubes.Vasiline! :lol: 
April 7, 2006 12:28:45 AM

Quote:
It's WRONG to call thermal pad not a thermal compound becasue as I mentioned earlier both paste(grease) and pad come under the same categories.
Good grief:
Quote:
The stuff that is on your heatsink from the factory is not really a thermal compound like you would buy in a tube

Does the bolding help?

Let me know when that sinks in.

You know, you have a pretty solid argument there. Now all you need is for someone to come along and claim that a thermal pad is not a thermal compound, period; and you'll have your counter-argument all ready to go.
!