Starting an XP computer on an MS-DOS system diskette

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Hello,

A friend of mine has found some virus files on his
HDD, which he is trying to erase. Since they seem
to be "locked", he cannot do it from Windows Explorer,
neither from the ordinary window, nor from Safe Mode
Windows or its CMD prompt.

I have been thinking of doing it for him, after
starting his computer from an MS-System diskette.
The funny thing with his computer, which normally
runs Windows XP, is that you only end up on the
A:\ drive after starting on the systems diskette,
and it seems impossible to change to C:\.

Quite strange, IMHO, since I thought that the
whole idea with a systems diskette was to be
able to reach the whole HDD without possible
locks applied by the Windows OS!

Would appreciate any ideas which could help us
from A:\ to C:\ after starting on an MS-DOS
diskette!

TIA,
Kim

Kim_il_zoomxxx@hotmail.com
[remove the excess x:s]
10 answers Last reply
More about starting computer system diskette
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    To be able to read the hard drive from DOS mode, you
    would need to use a third party application. I have used
    NTFSDos Pro and it works well. The reason is that your
    hard drive is formatted with NTFS. You cannot read NTFS
    while in a DOS environment, unless you use an NTFS reader
    like NTFS Pro.

    >-----Original Message-----
    >Hello,
    >
    >A friend of mine has found some virus files on his
    >HDD, which he is trying to erase. Since they seem
    >to be "locked", he cannot do it from Windows Explorer,
    >neither from the ordinary window, nor from Safe Mode
    >Windows or its CMD prompt.
    >
    >I have been thinking of doing it for him, after
    >starting his computer from an MS-System diskette.
    >The funny thing with his computer, which normally
    >runs Windows XP, is that you only end up on the
    >A:\ drive after starting on the systems diskette,
    >and it seems impossible to change to C:\.
    >
    >Quite strange, IMHO, since I thought that the
    >whole idea with a systems diskette was to be
    >able to reach the whole HDD without possible
    >locks applied by the Windows OS!
    >
    >Would appreciate any ideas which could help us
    >from A:\ to C:\ after starting on an MS-DOS
    >diskette!
    >
    >TIA,
    >Kim
    >
    >Kim_il_zoomxxx@hotmail.com
    >[remove the excess x:s]
    >
    >.
    >
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    the installation of xp has most probably converted the c: drive to the NTFS
    file system, which cannot be read from standard MS-DOS.
    So booting this system from a Windows 9x type system diskette is a no go and
    will only end up on a: (which you've experienced).
    That's the way the cookie crumbles.
    There are however various methods of getting into the system.
    One of them would be to start the system with the CD drive first in the bios
    startup sequence and having the XP CD in the drive.
    Setup will lauch and somewhere along the line you are asked what you want.
    Indicate you want to repair (Manually) and it will start what's known as the
    'Recovery Console' from the CD.
    This is a mini (mini) dare I say, XP OS, that will enable you to at least
    use some commands from a command prompt (Type Help in the command prompt to
    see the available ones) and that might possibly be enough to get back into
    the game.
    If not, then you might want to resort to creating some sort of Recovery CD
    (http://flyakite.msfnhosting.com/BartPE.htm) with a lot more functionality,
    but you'll have to create that one on another machine.

    hth to get you going

    george


    "Kim_il_Zoom" <Kim_il_zoomxxx@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:4141F327.7000105@hotmail.com...
    > Hello,
    >
    > A friend of mine has found some virus files on his
    > HDD, which he is trying to erase. Since they seem
    > to be "locked", he cannot do it from Windows Explorer,
    > neither from the ordinary window, nor from Safe Mode
    > Windows or its CMD prompt.
    >
    > I have been thinking of doing it for him, after
    > starting his computer from an MS-System diskette.
    > The funny thing with his computer, which normally
    > runs Windows XP, is that you only end up on the
    > A:\ drive after starting on the systems diskette,
    > and it seems impossible to change to C:\.
    >
    > Quite strange, IMHO, since I thought that the
    > whole idea with a systems diskette was to be
    > able to reach the whole HDD without possible
    > locks applied by the Windows OS!
    >
    > Would appreciate any ideas which could help us
    > from A:\ to C:\ after starting on an MS-DOS
    > diskette!
    >
    > TIA,
    > Kim
    >
    > Kim_il_zoomxxx@hotmail.com
    > [remove the excess x:s]
    >
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    OK, George, that might also be worth trying!
    BTW, the startup MS-DOS disk we tried was made by XP.

    Rgds,
    Rolf

    george wrote:
    > the installation of xp has most probably converted the c: drive to the NTFS
    > file system, which cannot be read from standard MS-DOS.
    > So booting this system from a Windows 9x type system diskette is a no go and
    > will only end up on a: (which you've experienced).
    > That's the way the cookie crumbles.
    > There are however various methods of getting into the system.
    > One of them would be to start the system with the CD drive first in the bios
    > startup sequence and having the XP CD in the drive.
    > Setup will lauch and somewhere along the line you are asked what you want.
    > Indicate you want to repair (Manually) and it will start what's known as the
    > 'Recovery Console' from the CD.
    > This is a mini (mini) dare I say, XP OS, that will enable you to at least
    > use some commands from a command prompt (Type Help in the command prompt to
    > see the available ones) and that might possibly be enough to get back into
    > the game.
    > If not, then you might want to resort to creating some sort of Recovery CD
    > (http://flyakite.msfnhosting.com/BartPE.htm) with a lot more functionality,
    > but you'll have to create that one on another machine.
    >
    > hth to get you going
    >
    > george
    >
    >
    >
    > "Kim_il_Zoom" <Kim_il_zoomxxx@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    > news:4141F327.7000105@hotmail.com...
    >
    >>Hello,
    >>
    >>A friend of mine has found some virus files on his
    >>HDD, which he is trying to erase. Since they seem
    >>to be "locked", he cannot do it from Windows Explorer,
    >>neither from the ordinary window, nor from Safe Mode
    >>Windows or its CMD prompt.
    >>
    >>I have been thinking of doing it for him, after
    >>starting his computer from an MS-System diskette.
    >>The funny thing with his computer, which normally
    >>runs Windows XP, is that you only end up on the
    >>A:\ drive after starting on the systems diskette,
    >>and it seems impossible to change to C:\.
    >>
    >>Quite strange, IMHO, since I thought that the
    >>whole idea with a systems diskette was to be
    >>able to reach the whole HDD without possible
    >>locks applied by the Windows OS!
    >>
    >>Would appreciate any ideas which could help us
    >>from A:\ to C:\ after starting on an MS-DOS
    >>diskette!
    >>
    >>TIA,
    >>Kim
    >>
    >>Kim_il_zoomxxx@hotmail.com
    >>[remove the excess x:s]
    >>
    >
    >
    >
  4. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    The MS-DOS diskette created by XP is a simple Windows Me DOS disk. As such
    it can't read the NTFS file format even though it was created from XP. It
    only contains the basic system files to start into DOS. Nothing more. George
    mentioned an NTFS reader app that runs off a DOS floppy. Here is a version
    that is freeware http://www.ntfs.com/products.htm

    I suspect you might end up frustrating yourselves trying to get this going.
    You might want to just run a Repair Install (info on how to do that here
    http://www.webtree.ca/windowsxp/repair_xp.htm . If you have access to
    another computer running Windows XP or Windows 2000 you can pull the drive
    and connect it to that system and pull data off the drive to backup what's
    important and then do a fresh install.


    --

    Harry Ohrn MS-MVP [Shell/User]
    www.webtree.ca/windowsxp


    "Kim_il_Zoom" <Kim_il_zoomxxx@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:414241F2.7070803@hotmail.com...
    > OK, George, that might also be worth trying!
    > BTW, the startup MS-DOS disk we tried was made by XP.
    >
    > Rgds,
    > Rolf
    >
    > george wrote:
    >> the installation of xp has most probably converted the c: drive to the
    >> NTFS file system, which cannot be read from standard MS-DOS.
    >> So booting this system from a Windows 9x type system diskette is a no go
    >> and will only end up on a: (which you've experienced).
    >> That's the way the cookie crumbles.
    >> There are however various methods of getting into the system.
    >> One of them would be to start the system with the CD drive first in the
    >> bios startup sequence and having the XP CD in the drive.
    >> Setup will lauch and somewhere along the line you are asked what you
    >> want.
    >> Indicate you want to repair (Manually) and it will start what's known as
    >> the 'Recovery Console' from the CD.
    >> This is a mini (mini) dare I say, XP OS, that will enable you to at least
    >> use some commands from a command prompt (Type Help in the command prompt
    >> to see the available ones) and that might possibly be enough to get back
    >> into the game.
    >> If not, then you might want to resort to creating some sort of Recovery
    >> CD (http://flyakite.msfnhosting.com/BartPE.htm) with a lot more
    >> functionality, but you'll have to create that one on another machine.
    >>
    >> hth to get you going
    >>
    >> george
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> "Kim_il_Zoom" <Kim_il_zoomxxx@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    >> news:4141F327.7000105@hotmail.com...
    >>
    >>>Hello,
    >>>
    >>>A friend of mine has found some virus files on his
    >>>HDD, which he is trying to erase. Since they seem
    >>>to be "locked", he cannot do it from Windows Explorer,
    >>>neither from the ordinary window, nor from Safe Mode
    >>>Windows or its CMD prompt.
    >>>
    >>>I have been thinking of doing it for him, after
    >>>starting his computer from an MS-System diskette.
    >>>The funny thing with his computer, which normally
    >>>runs Windows XP, is that you only end up on the
    >>>A:\ drive after starting on the systems diskette,
    >>>and it seems impossible to change to C:\.
    >>>
    >>>Quite strange, IMHO, since I thought that the
    >>>whole idea with a systems diskette was to be
    >>>able to reach the whole HDD without possible
    >>>locks applied by the Windows OS!
    >>>
    >>>Would appreciate any ideas which could help us
    >>>from A:\ to C:\ after starting on an MS-DOS
    >>>diskette!
    >>>
    >>>TIA,
    >>>Kim
    >>>
    >>>Kim_il_zoomxxx@hotmail.com
    >>>[remove the excess x:s]
    >>>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >
  5. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    True, but seeing he has (he thinks) a virus, just being able to read isn't
    good enough. He has to be able to delete and write to it as well and *that*
    version costs $$$.
    :-))
    george

    "Abel Diaz" <anonymous@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:9f1601c49789$08c3cd20$a601280a@phx.gbl...
    > To be able to read the hard drive from DOS mode, you
    > would need to use a third party application. I have used
    > NTFSDos Pro and it works well. The reason is that your
    > hard drive is formatted with NTFS. You cannot read NTFS
    > while in a DOS environment, unless you use an NTFS reader
    > like NTFS Pro.
    >
    >>-----Original Message-----
    >>Hello,
    >>
    >>A friend of mine has found some virus files on his
    >>HDD, which he is trying to erase. Since they seem
    >>to be "locked", he cannot do it from Windows Explorer,
    >>neither from the ordinary window, nor from Safe Mode
    >>Windows or its CMD prompt.
    >>
    >>I have been thinking of doing it for him, after
    >>starting his computer from an MS-System diskette.
    >>The funny thing with his computer, which normally
    >>runs Windows XP, is that you only end up on the
    >>A:\ drive after starting on the systems diskette,
    >>and it seems impossible to change to C:\.
    >>
    >>Quite strange, IMHO, since I thought that the
    >>whole idea with a systems diskette was to be
    >>able to reach the whole HDD without possible
    >>locks applied by the Windows OS!
    >>
    >>Would appreciate any ideas which could help us
    >>from A:\ to C:\ after starting on an MS-DOS
    >>diskette!
    >>
    >>TIA,
    >>Kim
    >>
    >>Kim_il_zoomxxx@hotmail.com
    >>[remove the excess x:s]
    >>
    >>.
    >>
  6. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    Hi all,

    Thanks a lot for your advice. Yes, that seems to be
    the problem/solution.

    And to you George, I have to tell you that his
    fully paid, well reputed AV software has indeed
    found viruses, and although the parameters are set
    to remove the infected files, they seem to fail in
    this case. He is now communicating with the people
    at the company.

    In the meantime, I was thinking of the more hands-on
    DOS approach, but sofar alas!

    Rgds,
    Kim


    george wrote:
    > True, but seeing he has (he thinks) a virus, just being able to read isn't
    > good enough. He has to be able to delete and write to it as well and *that*
    > version costs $$$.
    > :-))
    > george
    >
    > "Abel Diaz" <anonymous@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > news:9f1601c49789$08c3cd20$a601280a@phx.gbl...
    >
    >>To be able to read the hard drive from DOS mode, you
    >>would need to use a third party application. I have used
    >>NTFSDos Pro and it works well. The reason is that your
    >>hard drive is formatted with NTFS. You cannot read NTFS
    >>while in a DOS environment, unless you use an NTFS reader
    >>like NTFS Pro.
    >>
    >>
    >>>-----Original Message-----
    >>>Hello,
    >>>
    >>>A friend of mine has found some virus files on his
    >>>HDD, which he is trying to erase. Since they seem
    >>>to be "locked", he cannot do it from Windows Explorer,
    >>>neither from the ordinary window, nor from Safe Mode
    >>>Windows or its CMD prompt.
    >>>
    >>>I have been thinking of doing it for him, after
    >>>starting his computer from an MS-System diskette.
    >>>The funny thing with his computer, which normally
    >>>runs Windows XP, is that you only end up on the
    >>>A:\ drive after starting on the systems diskette,
    >>>and it seems impossible to change to C:\.
    >>>
    >>>Quite strange, IMHO, since I thought that the
    >>>whole idea with a systems diskette was to be
    >>>able to reach the whole HDD without possible
    >>>locks applied by the Windows OS!
    >>>
    >>>Would appreciate any ideas which could help us
    >>
    >>>from A:\ to C:\ after starting on an MS-DOS
    >>
    >>>diskette!
    >>>
    >>>TIA,
    >>>Kim
    >>>
    >>>Kim_il_zoomxxx@hotmail.com
    >>>[remove the excess x:s]
    >>>
    >>>.
    >>>
    >>
    >
    >
  7. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    Harry,

    Thank you very much for that info!

    Rgds,
    Kim

    Harry Ohrn wrote:
    > The MS-DOS diskette created by XP is a simple Windows Me DOS disk. As such
    > it can't read the NTFS file format even though it was created from XP. It
    > only contains the basic system files to start into DOS. Nothing more. George
    > mentioned an NTFS reader app that runs off a DOS floppy. Here is a version
    > that is freeware http://www.ntfs.com/products.htm
    >
    > I suspect you might end up frustrating yourselves trying to get this going.
    > You might want to just run a Repair Install (info on how to do that here
    > http://www.webtree.ca/windowsxp/repair_xp.htm . If you have access to
    > another computer running Windows XP or Windows 2000 you can pull the drive
    > and connect it to that system and pull data off the drive to backup what's
    > important and then do a fresh install.
    >
    >
  8. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    Kim_il_Zoom <Kim_il_zoomxxx@hotmail.com> wrote in
    news:41423B46.6040101@hotmail.com:

    > And to you George, I have to tell you that his
    > fully paid, well reputed AV software has indeed
    > found viruses, and although the parameters are set
    > to remove the infected files, they seem to fail in
    > this case. He is now communicating with the people
    > at the company.
    >
    > In the meantime, I was thinking of the more hands-on
    > DOS approach, but sofar alas!

    Tell him to go to Panda AV and do an online scan, they're VERY good
    about removing things.
    http://www.pandasoftware.com/activescan/com/activescan_principal.htm

    His "paid, well reputed AV software" is possibly not up to date, maybe?
    None of them work if not updated regularly.

    Another problem is that he may not have a virus, it could be some other
    type of mal-ware so have him download and run SpyBot S&D, it's free
    (but a donation would be nice) from:
    http://www.safer-networking.org/en/download/index.html

    PS, often infected files can be removed by booting into safe mode.
  9. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    Hi XS (hope it´s OK if I only use your first name),

    Thank you for your suggestion to try the Panda
    online scan. I will pass on your suggestion to
    my friend. If Panda is good at killing bugs as
    well, then BINGO!

    His software is very much up-to-date, so that
    cannot be the culprit. He has already tried
    deleting the virus file in Safe Mode, to no
    avail (C:\WINDOWS\svchost.exe Infection: W32/Plexus.B)

    My experience with AV software vs. spyware is
    that they do not "overlap". What is regarded as
    virus by AV is usually not spotted by for example
    Spybot(which I use myself) and spyware is not
    regarded as virus by AV programs.

    Various anti-spyware, such as Ad-Aware and Spy-
    bot do overlap to some extent; at the same they
    seem to chase different species of bugs, so I use
    both.

    My friend lives in a country with poor telephone
    lines, so his Panda online scan may literally take
    days. OTH, they do not pay much for domestic phone
    calls over there <g>!

    Regards,
    Kim


    XS11E wrote:
    > Kim_il_Zoom <Kim_il_zoomxxx@hotmail.com> wrote in
    > news:41423B46.6040101@hotmail.com:
    >
    >
    >>And to you George, I have to tell you that his
    >>fully paid, well reputed AV software has indeed
    >>found viruses, and although the parameters are set
    >>to remove the infected files, they seem to fail in
    >>this case. He is now communicating with the people
    >>at the company.
    >>
    >>In the meantime, I was thinking of the more hands-on
    >>DOS approach, but sofar alas!
    >
    >
    > Tell him to go to Panda AV and do an online scan, they're VERY good
    > about removing things.
    > http://www.pandasoftware.com/activescan/com/activescan_principal.htm
    >
    > His "paid, well reputed AV software" is possibly not up to date, maybe?
    > None of them work if not updated regularly.
    >
    > Another problem is that he may not have a virus, it could be some other
    > type of mal-ware so have him download and run SpyBot S&D, it's free
    > (but a donation would be nice) from:
    > http://www.safer-networking.org/en/download/index.html
    >
    > PS, often infected files can be removed by booting into safe mode.
    >
  10. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    Kim_il_Zoom <Kim_il_zoomxxx@hotmail.com> wrote in
    news:41434DC6.1010204@hotmail.com:

    > Hi XS (hope it´s OK if I only use your first name),

    You can call me anything as long as you call me when dinner's ready!

    > Thank you for your suggestion to try the Panda
    > online scan. I will pass on your suggestion to
    > my friend. If Panda is good at killing bugs as
    > well, then BINGO!

    I can only say it worked for me and I've recommended it to others
    who've also had success with it. Having said that, I'm not a big fan
    of Panda AV products in general, just the online scan...
    >
    > His software is very much up-to-date, so that
    > cannot be the culprit. He has already tried
    > deleting the virus file in Safe Mode, to no
    > avail (C:\WINDOWS\svchost.exe Infection: W32/Plexus.B)
    >
    > My experience with AV software vs. spyware is
    > that they do not "overlap". What is regarded as
    > virus by AV is usually not spotted by for example
    > Spybot(which I use myself) and spyware is not
    > regarded as virus by AV programs.

    You are absolutely correct BUT sometimes what is really spyware might
    act like a virus or possibly vice versa, that's why I recommend a
    spyware removal tool to see if it finds anything.

    > My friend lives in a country with poor telephone
    > lines, so his Panda online scan may literally take
    > days. OTH, they do not pay much for domestic phone
    > calls over there <g>!

    Check the Panda website, I think you can maybe log off and then
    continue the scan and reconnect for results? Or did I find that on
    some other site? Take a look, it might help.

    BTW, if you're talking about days to scan and disinfect maybe it's time
    to think about backing up needed files, scanning the backups and then
    formatting and reinstalling from scratch? That can often be done in
    less time than tracking down a problem...
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