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Moving WINDOWS XP(OEM VERSION)

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Anonymous
September 10, 2004 7:33:01 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

XP OEM Clarification




The End User License Agreement (EULA) for OEM software, including Windows
XP, states that the software is licensed as a single integrated product in
connection with the hardware. However, it's important to remember that the
end user cannot see nor accept the electronic EULA until the software is
installed on a fully-assembled computer system. So, even though the original
OEM software unit may have been distributed with a component, like a hard
drive, it isn't until the software is installed on a fully-assembled computer
system that it becomes "married" to the hardware.

In general, OEM software may not be transferred from one system to another
system. However, the computer system can certainly be updated with new
components without the requirement of a new software license. The only
exception to this is the motherboard 1. If the motherboard is replaced 2,
the computer system is deemed "new" and a new license would be required.
Other PC components may be upgraded, including a hard drive. Though if the
hard drive 3 is replaced/upgraded, the operating system must first be
removed from the old hard drive. To restate: the operating system is
"married" to the computer system on which it is originally installed.

If you haven't already, please take a moment to review a comprehensive
group of OEM Licensing Questions and Answers which are specific to system
builders:
https://oem.microsoft.com/worldwide/514341.asp.
The link above is for registered OEM builders.

Thank you,
The Microsoft OEM System Builder Licensing Team


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The above post was copied from a post from kurttrail posted to the
msnews.microsoft.com newsgroups and is supplied as is. Not convinced?
Another reply from The Microsoft OEM System Builder Licensing Team.

1. If prompted for a phone call activation after upgrading to a non OEM
motherboard on an OEM system, a new activation code would most likely be
denied.

2. If the motherboard is a factory replacement for a defective motherboard,
you can speed up the phone call activation process and avoid confusion by
stating you made upgrades in compliance with the OEM EULA. Although not
stated above, I would consider the replacement of a defective OEM motherboard
in compliance with the OEM EULA.

3. If changing to a new hard drive involves cloning the old hard drive to
the to the new hard drive and the old drive is removed from service,
formatting the drive is not necessary as it can be used as a backup source.
Anonymous
September 10, 2004 9:51:01 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

MS has said this may change in the future,,,,comments to them may speed the
process up, this way a new bare systems or mobo, you would not have to buy a
license to activate,,, what do you think,,, AYE ,,?

"Rho_1r" wrote:

> XP OEM Clarification
>
>
>
>
> The End User License Agreement (EULA) for OEM software, including Windows
> XP, states that the software is licensed as a single integrated product in
> connection with the hardware. However, it's important to remember that the
> end user cannot see nor accept the electronic EULA until the software is
> installed on a fully-assembled computer system. So, even though the original
> OEM software unit may have been distributed with a component, like a hard
> drive, it isn't until the software is installed on a fully-assembled computer
> system that it becomes "married" to the hardware.
>
> In general, OEM software may not be transferred from one system to another
> system. However, the computer system can certainly be updated with new
> components without the requirement of a new software license. The only
> exception to this is the motherboard 1. If the motherboard is replaced 2,
> the computer system is deemed "new" and a new license would be required.
> Other PC components may be upgraded, including a hard drive. Though if the
> hard drive 3 is replaced/upgraded, the operating system must first be
> removed from the old hard drive. To restate: the operating system is
> "married" to the computer system on which it is originally installed.
>
> If you haven't already, please take a moment to review a comprehensive
> group of OEM Licensing Questions and Answers which are specific to system
> builders:
> https://oem.microsoft.com/worldwide/514341.asp.
> The link above is for registered OEM builders.
>
> Thank you,
> The Microsoft OEM System Builder Licensing Team
>
>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> The above post was copied from a post from kurttrail posted to the
> msnews.microsoft.com newsgroups and is supplied as is. Not convinced?
> Another reply from The Microsoft OEM System Builder Licensing Team.
>
> 1. If prompted for a phone call activation after upgrading to a non OEM
> motherboard on an OEM system, a new activation code would most likely be
> denied.
>
> 2. If the motherboard is a factory replacement for a defective motherboard,
> you can speed up the phone call activation process and avoid confusion by
> stating you made upgrades in compliance with the OEM EULA. Although not
> stated above, I would consider the replacement of a defective OEM motherboard
> in compliance with the OEM EULA.
>
> 3. If changing to a new hard drive involves cloning the old hard drive to
> the to the new hard drive and the old drive is removed from service,
> formatting the drive is not necessary as it can be used as a backup source.
>
>
>
Anonymous
September 11, 2004 12:14:54 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Rho_1r wrote:
> MS has said this may change in the future,,,,comments to them may
> speed the process up, this way a new bare systems or mobo, you
> would not have to buy a license to activate,,, what do you think,,,
> AYE ,,?
>


The OEM EULA, which is all that the consumer sees and to which the
consumer must agree, does not bind the OS to any single specific
component, just the entire computer. Hence, it doesn't really matter
what Microsoft tells its Systems Builders on a web site that is not
accessible to the general public. Remember, it's the EULA - and
nothing else - that is the binding contract between the consumer and
the provider of the OEM license. If Microsoft wishes to define the
motherboard as the computer, they'll have to change the EULA to match.
Until then, the alleged contents of one web site is a moot point.

--

Bruce Chambers

Help us help you:
http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

You can have peace. Or you can have freedom. Don't ever count on
having both at once. - RAH
Related resources
Anonymous
November 15, 2004 8:59:01 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

keeping it simple ...i got a sweet deal on a computer PIII and i have an old
PII... simply can i take the old operating system and put it on the new
computer .. i want to take the hard drive out the old computer and put it in
the new one... what should i do


"Rho_1r" wrote:

> XP OEM Clarification
>
>
>
>
> The End User License Agreement (EULA) for OEM software, including Windows
> XP, states that the software is licensed as a single integrated product in
> connection with the hardware. However, it's important to remember that the
> end user cannot see nor accept the electronic EULA until the software is
> installed on a fully-assembled computer system. So, even though the original
> OEM software unit may have been distributed with a component, like a hard
> drive, it isn't until the software is installed on a fully-assembled computer
> system that it becomes "married" to the hardware.
>
> In general, OEM software may not be transferred from one system to another
> system. However, the computer system can certainly be updated with new
> components without the requirement of a new software license. The only
> exception to this is the motherboard 1. If the motherboard is replaced 2,
> the computer system is deemed "new" and a new license would be required.
> Other PC components may be upgraded, including a hard drive. Though if the
> hard drive 3 is replaced/upgraded, the operating system must first be
> removed from the old hard drive. To restate: the operating system is
> "married" to the computer system on which it is originally installed.
>
> If you haven't already, please take a moment to review a comprehensive
> group of OEM Licensing Questions and Answers which are specific to system
> builders:
> https://oem.microsoft.com/worldwide/514341.asp.
> The link above is for registered OEM builders.
>
> Thank you,
> The Microsoft OEM System Builder Licensing Team
>
>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> The above post was copied from a post from kurttrail posted to the
> msnews.microsoft.com newsgroups and is supplied as is. Not convinced?
> Another reply from The Microsoft OEM System Builder Licensing Team.
>
> 1. If prompted for a phone call activation after upgrading to a non OEM
> motherboard on an OEM system, a new activation code would most likely be
> denied.
>
> 2. If the motherboard is a factory replacement for a defective motherboard,
> you can speed up the phone call activation process and avoid confusion by
> stating you made upgrades in compliance with the OEM EULA. Although not
> stated above, I would consider the replacement of a defective OEM motherboard
> in compliance with the OEM EULA.
>
> 3. If changing to a new hard drive involves cloning the old hard drive to
> the to the new hard drive and the old drive is removed from service,
> formatting the drive is not necessary as it can be used as a backup source.
>
>
>
Anonymous
November 15, 2004 10:12:20 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

No, you cannot simply move the old hd and have the new computer start right
up. The OS has a component tailored to the hardware. It is called the
Hardware Abstraction Layer and it is created when you install the OS the
first time. The hardware is different on the new computer, so the HAL from
the old computer will be wrong. You did not say which OS is on the old hard
drive, but I assume it is XP since you posted to an XP group.

1. Do you have a retail XP cd from the old machine? (If the cd says on it
"for installation on a new computer only", then it is not a retail version
and you are not licensed to use it on any other computer than the old one.)

2. If it is a retail version, and it is an XP Upgrade version, do you have
a cd for an older copy of Windows?

3. If yes, then you will be able to install the XP cd on the new computer
provided that you format the old hard drive afterward.

"charles love" <charles love@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:CC57C3ED-B1BD-4BFB-88D5-C6C088055A6E@microsoft.com...
> keeping it simple ...i got a sweet deal on a computer PIII and i have an
> old
> PII... simply can i take the old operating system and put it on the new
> computer .. i want to take the hard drive out the old computer and put it
> in
> the new one... what should i do
>
>
> "Rho_1r" wrote:
>
>> XP OEM Clarification
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> The End User License Agreement (EULA) for OEM software, including
>> Windows
>> XP, states that the software is licensed as a single integrated product
>> in
>> connection with the hardware. However, it's important to remember that
>> the
>> end user cannot see nor accept the electronic EULA until the software is
>> installed on a fully-assembled computer system. So, even though the
>> original
>> OEM software unit may have been distributed with a component, like a hard
>> drive, it isn't until the software is installed on a fully-assembled
>> computer
>> system that it becomes "married" to the hardware.
>>
>> In general, OEM software may not be transferred from one system to
>> another
>> system. However, the computer system can certainly be updated with new
>> components without the requirement of a new software license. The only
>> exception to this is the motherboard 1. If the motherboard is replaced
>> 2,
>> the computer system is deemed "new" and a new license would be required.
>> Other PC components may be upgraded, including a hard drive. Though if
>> the
>> hard drive 3 is replaced/upgraded, the operating system must first be
>> removed from the old hard drive. To restate: the operating system is
>> "married" to the computer system on which it is originally installed.
>>
>> If you haven't already, please take a moment to review a comprehensive
>> group of OEM Licensing Questions and Answers which are specific to system
>> builders:
>> https://oem.microsoft.com/worldwide/514341.asp.
>> The link above is for registered OEM builders.
>>
>> Thank you,
>> The Microsoft OEM System Builder Licensing Team
>>
>>
>> --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
>>
>> The above post was copied from a post from kurttrail posted to the
>> msnews.microsoft.com newsgroups and is supplied as is. Not convinced?
>> Another reply from The Microsoft OEM System Builder Licensing Team.
>>
>> 1. If prompted for a phone call activation after upgrading to a non OEM
>> motherboard on an OEM system, a new activation code would most likely be
>> denied.
>>
>> 2. If the motherboard is a factory replacement for a defective
>> motherboard,
>> you can speed up the phone call activation process and avoid confusion by
>> stating you made upgrades in compliance with the OEM EULA. Although not
>> stated above, I would consider the replacement of a defective OEM
>> motherboard
>> in compliance with the OEM EULA.
>>
>> 3. If changing to a new hard drive involves cloning the old hard drive to
>> the to the new hard drive and the old drive is removed from service,
>> formatting the drive is not necessary as it can be used as a backup
>> source.
>>
>>
>>
Anonymous
November 16, 2004 1:27:59 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Unfortunately OEM versions are tied to the first system they are installed
on. In some instances an OEM is BIOS locked meaning it won't install to a
different system. Even if you can force it to install legally you can not
move it to a different system. .
--

Harry Ohrn MS-MVP [Shell/User]
www.webtree.ca/windowsxp


"charles love" <charles love@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:CC57C3ED-B1BD-4BFB-88D5-C6C088055A6E@microsoft.com...
> keeping it simple ...i got a sweet deal on a computer PIII and i have an
> old
> PII... simply can i take the old operating system and put it on the new
> computer .. i want to take the hard drive out the old computer and put it
> in
> the new one... what should i do
>
>
> "Rho_1r" wrote:
>
>> XP OEM Clarification
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> The End User License Agreement (EULA) for OEM software, including
>> Windows
>> XP, states that the software is licensed as a single integrated product
>> in
>> connection with the hardware. However, it's important to remember that
>> the
>> end user cannot see nor accept the electronic EULA until the software is
>> installed on a fully-assembled computer system. So, even though the
>> original
>> OEM software unit may have been distributed with a component, like a hard
>> drive, it isn't until the software is installed on a fully-assembled
>> computer
>> system that it becomes "married" to the hardware.
>>
>> In general, OEM software may not be transferred from one system to
>> another
>> system. However, the computer system can certainly be updated with new
>> components without the requirement of a new software license. The only
>> exception to this is the motherboard 1. If the motherboard is replaced
>> 2,
>> the computer system is deemed "new" and a new license would be required.
>> Other PC components may be upgraded, including a hard drive. Though if
>> the
>> hard drive 3 is replaced/upgraded, the operating system must first be
>> removed from the old hard drive. To restate: the operating system is
>> "married" to the computer system on which it is originally installed.
>>
>> If you haven't already, please take a moment to review a comprehensive
>> group of OEM Licensing Questions and Answers which are specific to system
>> builders:
>> https://oem.microsoft.com/worldwide/514341.asp.
>> The link above is for registered OEM builders.
>>
>> Thank you,
>> The Microsoft OEM System Builder Licensing Team
>>
>>
>> --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
>>
>> The above post was copied from a post from kurttrail posted to the
>> msnews.microsoft.com newsgroups and is supplied as is. Not convinced?
>> Another reply from The Microsoft OEM System Builder Licensing Team.
>>
>> 1. If prompted for a phone call activation after upgrading to a non OEM
>> motherboard on an OEM system, a new activation code would most likely be
>> denied.
>>
>> 2. If the motherboard is a factory replacement for a defective
>> motherboard,
>> you can speed up the phone call activation process and avoid confusion by
>> stating you made upgrades in compliance with the OEM EULA. Although not
>> stated above, I would consider the replacement of a defective OEM
>> motherboard
>> in compliance with the OEM EULA.
>>
>> 3. If changing to a new hard drive involves cloning the old hard drive to
>> the to the new hard drive and the old drive is removed from service,
>> formatting the drive is not necessary as it can be used as a backup
>> source.
>>
>>
>>
!