password doesn't control access

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

I have a computer running windows 98 SE and I want to password protect it. I
set the password in control panel/passwords but on logon I can simply press
cancel on the password dialog and windows will continue to load. How can I
cause the password to be required for access?
Thanx
11 answers Last reply
More about password doesn control access
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

    "Neil" <Neil@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:785D4892-C563-40B6-9145-C280868588F8@microsoft.com...
    > I have a computer running windows 98 SE and I want to password protect it.

    Set a password using the BIOS Setup program.

    >I set the password in control panel/passwords

    That doesn't protect the computer.
    That is designed to protect a User profile in Windows.

    > but on logon I can simply press
    > cancel on the password dialog and windows will continue to load. How can I
    > cause the password to be required for access?
    > Thanx
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

    "Hugh Candlin" <No@MeansNo.Com> wrote in message
    news:eOpc7nuEFHA.2180@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
    >
    > "Neil" <Neil@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > news:785D4892-C563-40B6-9145-C280868588F8@microsoft.com...
    > >I set the password in control panel/passwords
    >
    > That doesn't protect the computer.
    > That is designed to protect a User profile in Windows.

    Doesn't do that, either, <eg>.

    --
    Gary S. Terhune
    MS MVP Shell/User
    http://www.grystmill.com/articles/cleanboot.htm
    http://www.grystmill.com/articles/security.htm
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

    You can't natively. You can however use MVP Doug Knox' method, as shown here:
    http://www.dougknox.com/security/validated.htm

    Follow the instructions carefully, lest you lock yourself out of the computer.
    --
    Glen Ventura, MS MVP Shell/User, A+
    http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm


    "Neil" <Neil@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:785D4892-C563-40B6-9145-C280868588F8@microsoft.com...
    > I have a computer running windows 98 SE and I want to password protect it. I
    > set the password in control panel/passwords but on logon I can simply press
    > cancel on the password dialog and windows will continue to load. How can I
    > cause the password to be required for access?
    > Thanx
  4. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

    "Gary S. Terhune" <grystnews@mvps.org> wrote in message
    news:OENBU6uEFHA.1924@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
    > "Hugh Candlin" <No@MeansNo.Com> wrote in message
    > news:eOpc7nuEFHA.2180@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
    > >
    > > "Neil" <Neil@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > > news:785D4892-C563-40B6-9145-C280868588F8@microsoft.com...
    > > >I set the password in control panel/passwords
    > >
    > > That doesn't protect the computer.
    > > That is designed to protect a User profile in Windows.
    >
    > Doesn't do that, either, <eg>.

    Correctomundo. It is rudimentary protection.

    The fact that it is designed for a specific purpose
    does not mean that it is successful in accomplishing it.
    I realise that, all too well, and choose my words carefully,
    making sure not to claim that it was guaranteed protection.

    Alas, you almost have to write a book these days
    to cover all the nuances, extensions, extrapolations
    and whathaveyous.

    There is no such thing as a secure computer.

    You can put it in a bank vault type environment,
    with UPS and surge protection galore,
    behind umpteen hardware and software firewalls,
    with BIOS and OS passwords activated, running
    on RAID, with no floppy drive, no Internet access,
    and no additional software ever being installed,
    and it is still vulnerable, and always will be.

    Operator error, operator vandalism, robbery,
    lack of surge protection between the power supply unit
    and the delicate electronics and software bugs
    are just a few of the possible insecurities.

    Security is an unattainable goal. Sensible protection
    and a disaster recovery plan that has been tested
    and proven to work are more practical tactics.

    There, that takes care of the book cover blurb.
  5. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

    "Hugh Candlin" <No@MeansNo.Com> wrote in message
    news:uDCij93EFHA.1264@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
    <SNIP>
    >
    > Security is an unattainable goal. Sensible protection
    > and a disaster recovery plan that has been tested
    > and proven to work are more practical tactics.
    >
    > There, that takes care of the book cover blurb.
    >

    OK, there's the blurb, where's the book? Hop on it, man, <g>.

    --
    Gary S. Terhune
    MS MVP Shell/User
    http://www.grystmill.com/articles/cleanboot.htm
    http://www.grystmill.com/articles/security.htm
  6. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

    Hi,
    After reading the original poster, then reading glee's response followed by
    Hugh and Garys, it forces me to ask this question:::
    "How is the average 'mum n' dad' supposed to set a password to
    protect their kids from the obvious dangers of the internet"?

    Did microsoft in its wisdom expect consumers to fully understand
    BIOS the day they brought their computer home?
    Sometimes I think the whole scenario of computers is totally
    ridiculous due to it only ever presenting problems, even at
    mums and dads levels.
    Sort of makes one dive back into the book of Daniel or Ezekiel, which tells
    of the problems that would be encountered by the
    generation who are alive in the age that the computer is thrust upon them.

    scary stuff.

    regards Jane
  7. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

    The same way they protect their kids from all the other dangers in
    life--they pay attention to what their children are doing. And, they get
    Windows XP, which *does* have some pretty significant user control built
    in.

    If all you're looking at are the problems people are having (which is,
    after all, what this forum is all about--solving problems) then you're
    engaging in tunnel vision. Yes, there are problems, even when the
    computers run well. Sleep deprivation and other health threats from a
    more and more sedentary lifestyle dedicated to the various addictive
    pastimes to which the internet leads are probably the worst problems
    caused by home PCs.

    But for all its problems, there are lots and lots of good things, too. I
    know, first hand, that it would have been impossible, before this level
    of computer technology was reached, for my wife and I, with nearly no
    additional help, to mount a publishing business based upon free
    distribution of Guides to Services and Attractions, totally advertising
    supported, and in less than five years be making a darned decent living
    at it.

    The books of Daniel and Ezekiel foresaw the age of computers?

    --
    Gary S. Terhune
    MS MVP Shell/User
    http://www.grystmill.com/articles/cleanboot.htm
    http://www.grystmill.com/articles/security.htm

    "jane" <jane@internet.com> wrote in message
    news:%23RL$9u0EFHA.3780@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
    > Hi,
    > After reading the original poster, then reading glee's response
    followed by
    > Hugh and Garys, it forces me to ask this question:::
    > "How is the average 'mum n' dad' supposed to set a password to
    > protect their kids from the obvious dangers of the internet"?
    >
    > Did microsoft in its wisdom expect consumers to fully understand
    > BIOS the day they brought their computer home?
    > Sometimes I think the whole scenario of computers is totally
    > ridiculous due to it only ever presenting problems, even at
    > mums and dads levels.
    > Sort of makes one dive back into the book of Daniel or Ezekiel, which
    tells
    > of the problems that would be encountered by the
    > generation who are alive in the age that the computer is thrust upon
    them.
    >
    > scary stuff.
    >
    > regards Jane
    >
    >
  8. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

    > The books of Daniel and Ezekiel foresaw the age of computers?

    Yessum.

    regards Jane
  9. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

    Guess I'll have to dig out Asimov's Guide to the Bible and see if he
    mentions it.

    --
    Gary S. Terhune
    MS MVP Shell/User
    http://www.grystmill.com/articles/cleanboot.htm
    http://www.grystmill.com/articles/security.htm

    "jane" <jane@internet.com> wrote in message
    news:eQd5eJ6EFHA.4024@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
    > > The books of Daniel and Ezekiel foresaw the age of computers?
    >
    > Yessum.
    >
    > regards Jane
    >
    >
  10. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

    > Guess I'll have to dig out Asimov's Guide to the Bible and see if he
    > mentions it.

    Trust the author, its his book.

    regards Jane
  11. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

    Well, since I seriously doubt the word "computer" appears in the Bible,
    and I haven't the time or inclination to read the books of Daniel and
    Ezekiel in their entirety, and Asimov does a very good job of
    "condensing" and explaining much of the Bible in historical context, I
    thought I'd refer to him first.

    Unless you have some reference to the subject other than the cryptic
    writings found in the Book itself?

    --
    Gary S. Terhune
    MS MVP Shell/User
    http://www.grystmill.com/articles/cleanboot.htm
    http://www.grystmill.com/articles/security.htm

    "jane" <jane@internet.com> wrote in message
    news:Oin$NNAFFHA.3492@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
    >
    >
    > > Guess I'll have to dig out Asimov's Guide to the Bible and see if he
    > > mentions it.
    >
    > Trust the author, its his book.
    >
    > regards Jane
    >
    >
Ask a new question

Read More

Windows