Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Time on messages

Tags:
  • Microsoft
  • Windows
Last response: in Windows 95/98/ME
Share
Anonymous
February 25, 2005 7:44:25 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

When I see something like 12:25 AM for
the Date on a message, is 12:25 my time
or some other time?

More about : time messages

Anonymous
February 25, 2005 8:04:45 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

What messages, where?

Che messaggi? Dove?
--
~Robear Dyer (PA Bear)
MS MVP-Windows (Shell, IE/OE) & Security

Gianni wrote:
> When I see something like 12:25 AM for
> the Date on a message, is 12:25 my time
> or some other time?
Anonymous
February 25, 2005 8:31:15 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

For example, notes in the newsgroup ,
or notes in my inbox,
usually show a date and time.
I worded the query poorly.

I just noticed that your reply to my
append is 5:04AM which, I guess, is
based on my time zone (EST). Am I guessing
incorrectly.

I was mainly curious if there was a
time on the note that corresponded to
the writer's timezone; I can't find any.

Grazie

PA Bear wrote:

> What messages, where?
>
> Che messaggi? Dove?
Related resources
Anonymous
February 25, 2005 8:31:16 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

Messages and email are timestamped using computer's date/time, plus a
notation indicating time zone, according to the system's Regional
Settings. A similar conversion occurs on the receiving end.

Example: I send a post at 19:00:00 on Feb. 24, 2005. Since my Regional
Settings are set to Pacific Standard Time, which is 8 hours behind UTC
(GMT) the timestamp is:
Fri, 24 Feb 2005 19:00:00 -0800

If your system's Regional Settings have the time zone as Eastern
Standard Time, or UTC -0500, your system adds three hours to the
timestamp to give you your local time:
Fri, 24 Feb 2005 22:00:00 -0500

That date is, again, displayed according to your preferences, and in the
case of Outlook Express, it appears to be rounded off by simply dropping
the seconds figure: 19:00:01 and 19:00:59 round to 7:00 PM. (Though I'm
not absolutely sure of that.)

However, that's only the "Sent" timestamp. There are also various
timestamps added to the message as it passes through servers on its way
from me to you, the "Received" timestamp being that moment when it
landed on your email server (not when you download it from the
server--when it arrived at the server.) The Received timestamp is what
you usually see in the message queue, though in Outlook Express you can
add the "Sent" column to see that, too.

--
Gary S. Terhune
MS MVP Shell/User
http://www.grystmill.com/articles/cleanboot.htm
http://www.grystmill.com/articles/security.htm

"Gianni" <gianni@gianni.com> wrote in message
news:eQyzJUyGFHA.2936@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> For example, notes in the newsgroup ,
> or notes in my inbox,
> usually show a date and time.
> I worded the query poorly.
>
> I just noticed that your reply to my
> append is 5:04AM which, I guess, is
> based on my time zone (EST). Am I guessing
> incorrectly.
>
> I was mainly curious if there was a
> time on the note that corresponded to
> the writer's timezone; I can't find any.
>
> Grazie
>
> PA Bear wrote:
>
> > What messages, where?
> >
> > Che messaggi? Dove?
Anonymous
February 25, 2005 10:37:17 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

That explains it. I am using Netscape
and it drops off information when
the header is displayed. I printed out
the note and was able to see the
full information. It appears to be the
sent time with the time zone appended.

Thanks Gary and all who responded.
This is a great newsgroup.

Gary S. Terhune wrote:

>Messages and email are timestamped using computer's date/time, plus a
>notation indicating time zone, according to the system's Regional
>Settings. A similar conversion occurs on the receiving end.
>
>Example: I send a post at 19:00:00 on Feb. 24, 2005. Since my Regional
>Settings are set to Pacific Standard Time, which is 8 hours behind UTC
>(GMT) the timestamp is:
>Fri, 24 Feb 2005 19:00:00 -0800
>
>If your system's Regional Settings have the time zone as Eastern
>Standard Time, or UTC -0500, your system adds three hours to the
>timestamp to give you your local time:
>Fri, 24 Feb 2005 22:00:00 -0500
>
>That date is, again, displayed according to your preferences, and in the
>case of Outlook Express, it appears to be rounded off by simply dropping
>the seconds figure: 19:00:01 and 19:00:59 round to 7:00 PM. (Though I'm
>not absolutely sure of that.)
>
>However, that's only the "Sent" timestamp. There are also various
>timestamps added to the message as it passes through servers on its way
>from me to you, the "Received" timestamp being that moment when it
>landed on your email server (not when you download it from the
>server--when it arrived at the server.) The Received timestamp is what
>you usually see in the message queue, though in Outlook Express you can
>add the "Sent" column to see that, too.
>
>
>
Anonymous
February 26, 2005 12:58:42 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

It depends on your newsreader, but times are usually displayed as your local
time. The message header includes the message time and the sender's
timezone.
--
Jeff Richards
MS MVP (Windows - Shell/User)
"Gianni" <gianni@gianni.com> wrote in message
news:eQyzJUyGFHA.2936@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> For example, notes in the newsgroup ,
> or notes in my inbox,
> usually show a date and time.
> I worded the query poorly.
? Dove?
!