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bent cpu pins

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April 20, 2006 4:23:26 AM

I just upgraded my CPU to a Opteron 165, I'm very impressed and I havent even overclocked it yet. anyways during the upgrade I went to take the heat sink off my old cpu and well when I took it off it came off the cpu came with it. So it pulled through the cpu lock. With that, it bent about 7 of the pins on the cpu. I was hoping to use the cpu for a 2nd computer. anyways I was wondering if anyone else experienced that before and also how their cpu responed too it? thanks

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April 20, 2006 5:12:06 AM

I've heard that taking a mechanical pencil, inserting the bent pin into the tube, and carefully bending it back into place is the best option. Perhaps someone else here has personal experience with this?
April 20, 2006 1:34:47 PM

The using the mechanical pencil is a very good way, and you might also want to pick up a good pair of tweezers.
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April 20, 2006 1:38:41 PM

The mechanical pencil method is the best one AFAIK, just make sure that you don't leave any graphite dust and residues on the CPU pins, a few sprays of compressed air will do the trick.
April 20, 2006 1:58:17 PM

Agreed, just be very careful and be steady about bending it back to place. Be patient, better safe than sorry :twisted:
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April 20, 2006 3:19:00 PM

I agree with the pencil but exercise EXTREME caution, cause once they have bent, they VERY easily break
April 20, 2006 3:49:47 PM

Same thing happened to me with a AMD 64 3000+ it works still to this day.
April 20, 2006 3:55:43 PM

thanks for all the replies, i'll prolly go ahead and try and mechanical pencil trick when I'm ready. thanks again
April 20, 2006 5:01:22 PM

Like everyone else already said, the biggest thing to be careful of is breaking pins off. One thing you should know though, if you do break some pins off, all is not lost.

Firstly, modern cpus use a huge fraction of their pins for power and ground, and losing one of those isn't going to wreck your cpu Secondly, there usually are a number of pins that aren't actually connected at all, and obviously losing one of those won't kill you. Actually, it might help your chip lose some weight, so it'll go faster, like a car, right? : )

Anyway, if you do break off a pin, go get the datasheet for the processor and see what the pin was. If you're unlucky and get an address line or somthing, then you're still not really screwed.


The worst thing that I have ever done to a cpu was melt several pins off. I had a socket 370 Tualatin that was modded to go into a slot 1 BX board (I had a cpu card to convert from slot 1 to socket 370 ppga, and then manually converted to fcpga tualatin from there).

Even though it worked well, I thought the mod was pretty gross, as it involved crimped wires. One day I had the cpu out of the socket, and I thought, "I'm going to redo this properly." Without thinking (it was like 6:00 am) I went to solder wires onto the pins in question. The second my soldering iron hit one of these pins, like a half dozen fell off, pads and all, and I realized that the pins on this particular cpu were themselves actually only attached to the package with epoxy and solder, which I had melted (back in the day most cpus had their pins physically embedded in the package, not just stuck on.)

The moral to the story was that I melted a bunch of pins off of my processor, along with their pads, and only tiny dots of copper, smaller than a hair in thickness remained. I was pretty pissed off, so i threw the chip in a bag, and tossed it on the workbench, wanting never to look at it again. Anyway, a few months later, my cousin hooked up a needle / pin to his soldering iron, and resoldered pins / wires to the broken pins on my cpu. Ridicliously, the thing actually worked like this, and continues to work to this day.

Sorry for the friggin essay of a post here, but I thought it was a cool story, and might make you feel better about your situation. If you do break your cpu for good, and can't fix it, send it my way. : )
April 22, 2006 12:07:49 AM

I could really use ur help right now dstaple. I was installing a new motherboard and I acidentally bent a few of the pins (prolly about 6-8) and I tried to bend a bunch of them back in place, with some success but one came loose and broke off. Can you plz tell me where I can find this datasheet so I know if the CPU will still work?
Also, I heard you can take the broken off pin and put it into the pinhole socket where it is missing? is this possible to do? will it work? is there any danger in doing this?
As well, where can I possibly figure out how to soder the pin back on as it is extremely tiny. I have an A64 3200+ S754. Any help I will be utterly grateful.
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April 22, 2006 12:46:10 AM

I don't know what a mechanical pencil is, but Once in a while I'll come across bent pins and straighten them out with a 27 cent piece of brass tubing baught at my local hobby shop. Fits perfectly, encapsulates the entire pin. and gives the right amount of feel and leverage when cut to about3.5 inches.
April 22, 2006 12:52:36 AM

I found a guy that repairs broked CPU pins (puts news ones on) and it is really not that much money.

When you take off a HS you should twist it like 1-2 degrees left and right to brake the "suction".....really bad if you had AS 5 over the whole thing!
April 22, 2006 1:12:52 AM

I used to have one of those chips. The socket 754 specifications are at:
http://www.amd.com/us-en/assets/content_type/white_pape...
I just found this by googling: amd athlon 64 754 datasheet

The pin labels are on pages 31 and 32. Remember that this is the socket view, so if you look at the bottom of your processor everything will be backwards. Just use the key pins (top left on page 31) to keep your brain straight. Once you've found your pin, VSS and VDD are power and ground, and anything starting with NC isn't connected at all (s means source, d means drain).

Honestly, I would try the cpu even if the pin was labeled somthing else, likely wouldn't fry anything, and even with the risk, a cpu is worth more than a motherboard... If you're still screwed after this let me know and we'll discuss other options. If, as OldDude suggests, you can get them professionally resoldered cheap, then that would be by far the best.
April 22, 2006 10:11:28 PM

the one pin that I lost is labeled VSS and another pin which might be unrepairable is also labeled VSS. Is that good or bad?
April 22, 2006 10:14:55 PM

Quote:
the one pin that I lost is labeled VSS and another pin which might be unrepairable is also labeled VSS. Is that good or bad?


VSS pins are redundant ground connections, you're a lucky fellow !

Your CPU "should" work unless you misread the diagrams.
April 22, 2006 11:03:22 PM

Quote:
the one pin that I lost is labeled VSS and another pin which might be unrepairable is also labeled VSS. Is that good or bad?


VSS pins are redundant ground connections, you're a lucky fellow !

Your CPU "should" work unless you misread the diagrams.

Actually, those VSS & VDD pins are there with [more than] a [single] purpose: to avoid data pins's crosstalk. The CPU will work, nevertheless.

Just my 2 cents...

Edit: Corrected last paragraph.


Cheers!
April 22, 2006 11:21:36 PM

When your looking at the diagrams this is how I read them
Looking at the thermal paste side of the processor, the writing is the right way up so it can be read. Then I flip the processor over onto the other side and read the left and right sides like that.

If this is correct, since 1 pin is bent beyond repair can I just break that pin off? If it will work without it as long as the other pins are straight it should work? I might as well give it a try, nothing to lose, right?
Diagram:

Broken Pins are along the very inner circle of pins, in bottom right and bottom left of inner circle.
April 24, 2006 4:48:03 PM

Well listen, all of the pins around the very inside edge are power and ground, so even if you're reading the diagram wrong, then your answer will be right, if you get my drift. So yes, you broke off the 'lucky' pins.

As far as intentionally breaking off pins, you should really do your best to straighten them first. I have tried to cut pins off before, and it's harder than you'd think. Just get the pin halfway straight using anything, people here have suggested mechanical pencils, and that's probably a good place to start. Once it's perpindicular to the cpu again, use a pair of needle nose pliers to straighten it. Squish it first on two sides, then spin the chip 90 degrees to get the other two sides. Don't use pliers to bend the pin, or you'll probably break it.

If you do break the pin off, don't sweat it, because it doesn't matter that much anyway. You just shouldn't break off pins if you don't have to, it might not hurt your chip, but it definitely won't help it, or they would come that way...

Anyway, do what you can, and post back here telling us that it worked.
April 24, 2006 9:03:39 PM

didnt work :( 
booted it up, the fans started for a second then stopped...
no luck for me, looks like i need a new cpu...
thanks for the help anyway

p.s. mobile socket 754 athlon 64 cpu's work the exact same as non mobile cpu's right? they just work in laptops as well?
April 24, 2006 9:07:32 PM

Damn :(  ...
Did you get that other pin straightened out or what?
April 24, 2006 9:20:30 PM

nope lol, it fell off the grand canion
can u tell me tho, will mobile athlon 64 work in a desktop?
any performance difference?
April 24, 2006 9:26:54 PM

I've never actually seen one of those chips, but if I remember correctly they don't have heat spreaders, so an ordinary cpu cooler won't work right with them, as it will be too lose. Chips without heat spreaders kindof freak me out anyways.

As per performance difference, people used to love the athlon xp 2500+ mobile chips, because they overclocked like nuts, but I've never heard anyone mention the mobile A64's, which probably isn't a good sign.

If anything, I'd just expect it to be a cooler running A64, which isn't that bad. Didn't you just buy a new motherboard? Shame you didn't switch to socket 939?

That's a pain in the ass that your chip didn't work... are you positive that everything was setup right? Did you pop another chip in right after and have it work?
April 24, 2006 9:43:49 PM

The reason why I didn't upgrade to 939 is because I had a perfectly good socket 754 processor....well, i did anyway....
And I don't have another processor to pop in so I can't really test it. As for setting up everything right, I asked my tech teacher at school and showed it to him, he said everything looks good, so it must be the cpu. I just want to find a used CPU like the one I had but it isin't as easy as I thought it would....
April 24, 2006 9:49:38 PM

Did you test out the cpu on your old motherboard or your new one?
You should test it out using the exact setup that you had, the last time that everything was working, otherwise you don't know if it's the processor or anything else.

Did you change anything else when you installed the new motherboard? What kind of board is it?
April 24, 2006 9:54:39 PM

everything worked fine before I reinstalled the CPU. There are bent pins and like 2 broken off ones, its the CPU, trust me.

Back to the mobile cpu, what do you mean my heatsink wont fit on it?
April 24, 2006 10:07:36 PM

Look at this picture:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.asp?Item=N82E1681...

See how the processor is missing the metal can (heatspreader) that is on your normal chip? This makes it much thinner, so an ordinary cooler is just going to flop around on top of it. Also, if I understand correctly, these chips generally do not come with coolers.

On the other hand, I did a bit of reading, and it turns out that the mobile athlon 64 4000+ is actually the fastest chip for socket 754 (2.6ghz), and people are saying it overclocks good as well. The next best thing seems to be the (non-mobile) 3700+, at 2.4 gHz.

Anyway, even if you need to muck about with your cooler, if I were upgrading a socket 754 system right now then I'd probably go for that mobile 4000+. Just be sure that your motherboard is going to support the chip properly.

Some additional reading:
http://forums.tweakguides.com/showthread.php?p=28806
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Socket_754

What do you plan to do with your broken 3200+ ?
!