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HyperOS HyperDrive IV

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April 23, 2006 3:32:59 PM

HyperOS Systems has released a revision to thier RAM Drive, supporting SATA.

http://www.hyperossystems.co.uk/07042003/products.htm

It's $700 for the 8GB model, $1000 for the 16GB one (naturally, you supply the RAM)

I was wondering if anyone had any benchmarks for this yet.

More about : hyperos hyperdrive

April 25, 2006 7:52:05 PM

Over price !!

Get 2 Gigagbyte i-Ram, install as Raid 0 and get the same spec. with much less $$.
April 25, 2006 11:51:11 PM

No can do. My dual 7900GTX config only allows for 1 PCI card, and I'm saving room for a PhysX card
April 26, 2006 6:48:48 PM

In that case, you might want to consider Gigabyte i-Ram2 which will be release sometime early next year (a long wait.....)

It has 4xDDR2 ram slots supporting up to 16GB in total and will be using SATA2 as interface.
April 27, 2006 1:04:46 AM

wait, fitting in a 5.25" spot? 3.5"? PCI? PCIE?
April 27, 2006 3:05:43 AM

As of this moment, no details have been release yet by Gigabyte.
But, a mounting option inside 5.25" bay is one of them.
The device will use SATA2 as interface and use 1 PCI slot for power just like i-Ram1.

Check out this video on how i-Ram perform:
i-RAM demo video
April 27, 2006 3:13:10 AM

Wow, that video is amazing.

But if it uses PCI for power, I don't want it. Why can't it suck power directly from the PSU like all other components do?
April 27, 2006 3:22:10 AM

It uses the PCI slot for power because power is constantly supply to PCI slot as long as the PSU is pluged in.
Unlike other power points, power is only supply when you press the "Power ON" switch in-front of your PC.

Check this out for another option for you (which uses the PC's RAM):
RamDisk from Superspeed.com

You can download the trial software and try it.
April 27, 2006 3:33:56 AM

RamDisk seems cool, but I want to save my memory (all 2 gigs) for, well, Random Access Memory.

As for the I-Ram, if it uses a PCI slot, it's not for me. I'd be fine with dealing with an external brick, as long as I still had room for my PhysX card.

What about the DDRdrive? I've seen pictures of a prototype, and that's about it. It uses PCIe 1X I think, which I think I have room for in addition to my other slot. Got anything on that?
April 27, 2006 3:48:16 AM

As of now, DDRdrive is still a prototype.
According to their web site, DDRdrive will not be out until 2Q2006.
Also according to this review, it will price "compatitively" to compete with i-RAM.
One thing to point out also is that DDRdrive will not include a battery to backup the data.
Data is retained solely by an external power brick which supply power thru the back power port.
Being a PCIe device also requires the installation of external drivers to support it during Windows setup (F6).
April 28, 2006 7:32:08 PM

Why not just get another 2 GB of RAM and a RAMdisk utility? Not only would you have more RAM in dual-channel, but it would save a PCI slot. Set your pagefile to the RAM drive, and then there'll be no need to buy another $800 device.
April 28, 2006 7:52:56 PM

I'm quite certain Windows takes up more than 2 gigs of disk space. Even if it doesn't, it would still be nice if I could load like my favorite game on there so that it loads quickly.
April 28, 2006 8:46:04 PM

There are three reasons iRam or RAMDisks aren't commonplace:

1) They're too small
2) They're too unreliable
3) They're too expensive

When they sort all that out, I ain't buyin' it.
April 29, 2006 8:15:53 PM

You could set your pagefile, cookies folder, and browser cache to the RAMdrive. That would make your system a lot faster. And why would you put a Windows installation on a RAM drive anyway? I would be scared of one power loss and losing my OS. It won't help your speed that much, anyway.
April 29, 2006 11:16:02 PM

Did you watch the video? How can you say it doesn't speed up your OS?
April 30, 2006 12:25:39 AM

Quote:
Did you watch the video? How can you say it doesn't speed up your OS?


Just did now. Yeah, it's fast as hell, but it's just not reliable. Think practically. Are you willing to risk your Windows installation and files to something that impermanent? And besides, that was just a demonstration. They didn't have to worry about power outages and things like that. All it takes for RAM to lose it's mind is a moderate brown-out, and there goes your boot drive.

If it can be powered externally by an adapter that I can plug into my UPS, then I might save up the insane amount of cash for it. Capacity is also limited. Raptors are currently where it's at in the high-speed storage market. These RAM drives make Raptors seem like budget storage. If the technology matures and high-capacity RAM module prices drop even more, then I may consider one. But it'll take a while until I let Windows or any crucial data live on one of these things.
April 30, 2006 10:22:13 AM

Did you read my first post?
April 30, 2006 6:57:55 PM

What I did, my friend, is called agreement. It means I take something you said already and share the same mindset. Then, I vocalize it, so everyone with half their brain still attached to their spinal cord can understand. Apparently, you don't fit into that category, even though it was your original post. So sad, so sad.
April 30, 2006 7:52:20 PM

I agree. After you buy that hunk of crap, a redundant power supply, 4 gigs of slow RAM and such, you could have purchased 8 15,000 SCSI drivers and put them in RAID 0 for ungodly fast performance that doesn't die in a power drain.
April 30, 2006 8:10:15 PM

Infinitely louder, but much more useful. Quicker, safer, and larger. Taking another look at the high-RPM route, get either a SCSI or a SATA controller that supports RAID 0+1 or 10, and get 4 10,000 SCSI or SATA drives. Raid 0+1 is a mirorred array with striped segments, so you get the write transfer rates of RAID 0 with the read rates of RAID 1. 15,000 RPM drives have a low price/performance ratio, at least when compared to 10K RPM drives. That's what I would do.
April 30, 2006 9:45:27 PM

Quote:
Infinitely louder, but much more useful. Quicker, safer, and larger. Taking another look at the high-RPM route, get either a SCSI or a SATA controller that supports RAID 0+1 or 10, and get 4 10,000 SCSI or SATA drives. Raid 0+1 is a mirorred array with striped segments, so you get the write transfer rates of RAID 0 with the read rates of RAID 1. 15,000 RPM drives have a low price/performance ratio, at least when compared to 10K RPM drives. That's what I would do.

if you had unlimited budget, why not get 8 SCSI drivers for RAID 0 ?
April 30, 2006 11:38:16 PM

Quote:

if you had unlimited budget, why not get 8 SCSI drivers for RAID 0 ?


That makes more sense, especially seeing as it probably costs not a helluva lot more than the 8gb HyperDrive, which you'd probably only buy if you had an unlimited budget anyway.

Oh, and YourMothersAnAstronaut, telling me to 'think practically' isn't usually a phrase used by someone agreeing with someone else.
May 1, 2006 12:01:35 AM

Quote:

if you had unlimited budget, why not get 8 SCSI drivers for RAID 0 ?


That makes more sense, especially seeing as it probably costs not a helluva lot more than the 8gb HyperDrive, which you'd probably only buy if you had an unlimited budget anyway.

Oh, and YourMothersAnAstronaut, telling me to 'think practically' isn't usually a phrase used by someone agreeing with someone else.
http://anandtech.com/IT/showdoc.aspx?i=2745&p=3
:D rools: i would kill for a system like that..
May 1, 2006 4:52:06 AM

Putting that many drives in RAID 0 is usually a bad idea for long periods of time. That many chances for the whole array to go out with a very loud bang. With RAID 0+1 or 10, you have a lot of speed mixed with data parity, therefore security. And they still offer blazing IO and transfer rates.
May 1, 2006 5:37:02 AM

Quote:
Putting that many drives in RAID 0 is usually a bad idea for long periods of time. That many chances for the whole array to go out with a very loud bang. With RAID 0+1 or 10, you have a lot of speed mixed with data parity, therefore security. And they still offer blazing IO and transfer rates.

the drives are so small i could fit everything on a few dvd's lolz
May 18, 2006 10:30:08 PM

Here is another option from not too distance future:

Hybrid Hard Disk Drive.

Have both the benefits of flash drive (speed) and HDD (capacity).
May 18, 2006 10:35:30 PM

Quote:
Here is another option from not too distance future:

Hybrid Hard Disk Drive.

Have both the benefits of flash drive (speed) and HDD (capacity).

yeah, that looks awesome. whether things will utilize the cache fully, or if the cache will even be that fast will soon to be seen though.
November 5, 2006 5:27:12 PM

any updates on the Gigabyte i-RAM2 front? Or any DDR/DDR2-based drives for that matter?

I really like the concept of super-speedy solid-state storage.
!