Printing greyscale images on inkjet

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

I have scanned some old B&W photos as 8-bit greyscale images and I'm trying
to print them using my Epson Stylus Photo 890. I get best results in colour
mode, as using just the black ink gives a coarse result, but the prints have
a bluish tinge. I've tried all the driver settings, and using colour
management, but can't improve things.

Are there any clever tricks out there for improving the print quality? E.g.
is it worth investing in Epson ink...?

Mike
27 answers Last reply
More about printing greyscale images inkjet
  1. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    On Tue, 8 Feb 2005 08:53:12 -0000, "MikeD"
    <mike.dunstan@nochance.uk.thalesgroup.com> wrote:

    >I have scanned some old B&W photos as 8-bit greyscale images and I'm trying
    >to print them using my Epson Stylus Photo 890. I get best results in colour
    >mode, as using just the black ink gives a coarse result, but the prints have
    >a bluish tinge. I've tried all the driver settings, and using colour
    >management, but can't improve things.
    >
    >Are there any clever tricks out there for improving the print quality? E.g.
    >is it worth investing in Epson ink...?
    >
    >Mike
    >

    Printing accurate duplicates of what you see on your screen is truely
    not a one click operation...

    Your scaner has a color profile, your monitor and of course your
    printer which is most vulnerable as variances in modes, paper and ink
    all play a weighing factor.

    I would suggest researching color profiles and management. Start off
    of course by gama calibration.. Heck, thats all you may need... But
    alot of things add up to an accurate adjustment and usually not just
    one item.

    Here is a page to start you on your journey if you decide to learn
    about color profiles and correction

    Also, if you could get a photo editor that manages profiles such as
    photoshop or photoshop elements or even acdsee which is economical,
    you could atleast manage your color more accurately.


    http://194.100.88.243/petteri/pont/How_to/o_Color_Management/_Color_management.html

    http://www.photoscientia.co.uk/Gamma.htm
  2. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    "MikeD" <mike.dunstan@nochance.uk.thalesgroup.com> wrote in message
    news:cu9un4$1f0$1@rdel.co.uk...
    > I have scanned some old B&W photos as 8-bit greyscale images and I'm
    trying
    > to print them using my Epson Stylus Photo 890. I get best results in
    colour
    > mode, as using just the black ink gives a coarse result, but the prints
    have
    > a bluish tinge. I've tried all the driver settings, and using colour
    > management, but can't improve things.

    Tried aligning the carts?

    I believe it's also possible to get a "Quad Black" cart set for some
    printers. These replace colour carts with grey ink but need a new driver.
    Not sure about the 890.
  3. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    "CWatters" <colin.watters@pandoraBOX.be> wrote in message
    news:UT1Od.6425$xv5.345124@phobos.telenet-ops.be...

    > Tried aligning the carts?

    No, but I will tonight!

    > I believe it's also possible to get a "Quad Black" cart set for some
    > printers. These replace colour carts with grey ink but need a new driver.
    > Not sure about the 890.

    Sounds interesting, I will investigate.

    Thanks for the info.

    Mike
  4. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    If the image is too blue, you need to add yellow in the driver. If the
    tint is more cyan, you need to add red, if it is magenta add green, and
    vice versa. If between these add a mixture. You should be able to get
    something closer to neutral grayscale with driver adjustment, however,
    if you are using 3rd party inks, you may not be able to match the ink
    with the profiles Epson provides.

    Try making or acquiring a step wedge. This is a set of small patches of
    neutral gray steps going from 100%k to 0K (or white).

    You can probably find one on the internet to use.

    For instance, there is one here:

    http://www.mediapiculture.net/360days/about

    Make sure you convert it into grayscale file format if it isn't, so it
    doesn't have any hidden or obvious color tints in any of the step
    densities. Then print it using the drivers for your printer as you have
    them set, using colored ink. If you see great differences in the tint
    balance in different step densities, the profile for the inks you are
    using in not correct. You can try moving the driver sliders, but you
    will never get a neutral result over the whole range, since the sliders
    tend to move the tint universally across the steps.

    Epson's own inks may give you better results, since their printer ink
    profiles and papers are designed together.

    Art

    MikeD wrote:

    > I have scanned some old B&W photos as 8-bit greyscale images and I'm trying
    > to print them using my Epson Stylus Photo 890. I get best results in colour
    > mode, as using just the black ink gives a coarse result, but the prints have
    > a bluish tinge. I've tried all the driver settings, and using colour
    > management, but can't improve things.
    >
    > Are there any clever tricks out there for improving the print quality? E.g.
    > is it worth investing in Epson ink...?
    >
    > Mike
    >
    >
  5. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Arthur Entlich wrote:
    > If the image is too blue, you need to add yellow in the driver. If the
    > tint is more cyan, you need to add red, if it is magenta add green, and
    > vice versa. If between these add a mixture. You should be able to get
    > something closer to neutral grayscale with driver adjustment, however,
    > if you are using 3rd party inks, you may not be able to match the ink
    > with the profiles Epson provides.
    >
    Would not using a Curve adj. in Photoshop achieve the same thing?

    --
    John McWilliams

    Remember to pillage *before* you burn.
  6. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    "Arthur Entlich" <artistic@telus.net> wrote in message
    news:Xs2Od.30778$L_3.11533@clgrps13...

    <lots of good advice snipped>

    Thanks Art, I will try your suggestions.

    Mike
  7. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    "kryl" <krylonic> wrote in message
    news:g4fh01lftgj7bug6rde3pvdo7ar6r7lm93@4ax.com...

    > Printing accurate duplicates of what you see on your screen is truely
    > not a one click operation...

    I'm beginning to realise that! I can print colour photos just fine, because
    of course I don't know (or care) *exactly* what the colours should be.

    Grey scale is a different matter...

    > Here is a page to start you on your journey if you decide to learn
    > about color profiles and correction
    >
    > Also, if you could get a photo editor that manages profiles such as
    > photoshop or photoshop elements or even acdsee which is economical,
    > you could atleast manage your color more accurately.

    I'll have a look at the links. I've already played with profiles briefly (I
    use Paint Shop Pro 8 which allows this). It didn't make any difference to
    what I'm doing, which could be (as Art suggested) because I'm not using
    Epson inks.

    Mike
  8. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    "John McWilliams" <jpmcw@comcast.net> wrote in message
    news:ZcydnSBmi4s8RpXfRVn-jQ@comcast.com...

    > Would not using a Curve adj. in Photoshop achieve the same thing?

    The images are grey scale, I would have to convert them to colour first.

    Something else to try...

    Mike
  9. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    MikeD wrote:
    > "John McWilliams" <jpmcw@comcast.net> wrote in message
    > news:ZcydnSBmi4s8RpXfRVn-jQ@comcast.com...
    >
    >
    >>Would not using a Curve adj. in Photoshop achieve the same thing?
    >
    >
    > The images are grey scale, I would have to convert them to colour first.
    >
    > Something else to try...
    >
    D'Oh! I forgot; my greyscales aren't true greyscale, because I convert
    to B+W and retain the color info. For some reason, I seem to not get a
    color cast on my B+W images.... so far.

    --
    John McWilliams
  10. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    On Tue, 8 Feb 2005 16:02:08 -0000, "MikeD"
    <mike.dunstan@nochance.uk.thalesgroup.com> wrote:

    >"John McWilliams" <jpmcw@comcast.net> wrote in message
    >news:ZcydnSBmi4s8RpXfRVn-jQ@comcast.com...
    >
    >> Would not using a Curve adj. in Photoshop achieve the same thing?
    >
    >The images are grey scale, I would have to convert them to colour first.
    >
    >Something else to try...
    >
    >Mike
    >


    Well, The best way is starting off with color images and using
    adjustment layers. This will give you total control over tones after
    the image is desaturated.

    Either way, you could convert your workspace into RGB and use channels
    or color mixing to control your tones but the main problem appears
    that you are NOT printing what you are seeing on screen. That problem
    needs to be addressed... Adjusting and mixing the drivers and ink
    amounts it not a good way of acurate printing.

    Get yourself calibrated properly and nothing else matters.
  11. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    kryl wrote:
    >
    > Well, The best way is starting off with color images and using
    > adjustment layers. This will give you total control over tones after
    > the image is desaturated.

    That's the way I usually do it, and it works well using two adj. layers,
    one of which is set to color blend and can adj. each channel.
    >
    > Either way, you could convert your workspace into RGB and use channels
    > or color mixing to control your tones but the main problem appears
    > that you are NOT printing what you are seeing on screen. That problem
    > needs to be addressed... Adjusting and mixing the drivers and ink
    > amounts it not a good way of acurate printing.
    >
    > Get yourself calibrated properly and nothing else matters.
    >
    Yes, but that implies calibrating the monitor and the printer. Even if
    the monitor is perfectly calibrated, the OP still needs help in removing
    the color cast in the absence of a calibrated printer.

    --
    John McWilliams
  12. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    kryl wrote:
    [...] but the main problem appears
    > that you are NOT printing what you are seeing on screen. That problem
    > needs to be addressed...

    Yes, and it ain't easy. Different monitors will display the same colours
    differently. People's eyes see colours differently. Ink colours change
    in subtle ways when different papers are used. Some papers will fade the
    different inks in the image at different rates because of acid or base
    residues used to make the paper pH neutral (but falsely labelled
    acid-free). The image will appear to have different colours when viewed
    in different light. And so on. Sigh.

    > Adjusting and mixing the drivers and ink
    > amounts it not a good way of acurate printing.
    >
    > Get yourself calibrated properly and nothing else matters.

    Do you have any recomnmendations for calibration software?

    Thanks.
  13. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    "MikeD" <mike.dunstan@nochance.uk.thalesgroup.com> wrote in message
    news:cuaa11$d79$1@rdel.co.uk...

    > Sounds interesting, I will investigate.

    This is what I had in mind...
    http://www.lyson.com/quad-black-tone.html

    However..

    Does the 890 have the heads built into the cart or are they part of the
    printer? If the head isn't built into the cart think carefully before you
    switch over. You would really only want to do this if you needed a printer
    dedicated to B&W all the time. It would be very expensive to switch back and
    forth - you would have to do a lot of flushing of heads/plumbing and these
    things era prone to getting blocked.
  14. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    On Tue, 08 Feb 2005 12:42:31 GMT, Arthur Entlich <artistic@telus.net>
    wrote:


    >Epson's own inks may give you better results, since their printer ink
    >profiles and papers are designed together.
    >
    I've seen better results than Epson with Permajet Blax and Permajet
    papers actually (or Permajet Blax and several other makes of papers as
    well.)

    The problem with the 890 is that it's using colour so you're into
    colour management. Generally, I find that allowing the printer to do
    any colour management whatsoever is a big mistake.

    The best solution is a dedicated B&W printer using, for example, the
    inks mentio0ned above. Next best is properly colour managing. Worst is
    adjusting the printer management because you can be sure that it'll be
    different for almost every print.

    --

    Hecate - The Real One
    Hecate@newsguy.com
    veni, vidi, reliqui
  15. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    On Tue, 08 Feb 2005 13:32:11 -0500, Wolf Kirchmeir
    <wwolfkir@sympatico.ca> wrote:


    >> Get yourself calibrated properly and nothing else matters.
    >
    >Do you have any recomnmendations for calibration software?
    >
    >Thanks.


    Gretag MacBeth EyeOne. If you can't afford anything else, make sure
    you calibrate your monitor. Of course, you do need editing software
    which is colour management aware.

    --

    Hecate - The Real One
    Hecate@newsguy.com
    veni, vidi, reliqui
  16. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    "Hecate" <hecate@newsguy.com> wrote in message
    news:bdti01draujsrr0qchpil8ao2on7ksmg3k@4ax.com...

    > The best solution is a dedicated B&W printer using, for example, the
    > inks mentio0ned above. Next best is properly colour managing. Worst is
    > adjusting the printer management because you can be sure that it'll be
    > different for almost every print.

    Thanks to all for your helpful suggestions. My problem really is that I only
    have 3 B&W photos to print. They are long (about 44") which is something the
    Epson 890 can do, but given a choice between spending weeks of my life
    learning and applying colour management or getting a lab to print them for
    me, I might go for the latter!

    Mike
  17. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    The original poster didn't indicate he had any image manipulation
    software other than a scanner and it's program, and his printer.

    As a result, I sent him to his printer driver, since that I knew he had
    access to. There are hundreds of image programs out there, and each has
    probably a dozen or more tools for color corrections, each providing
    different degrees of sophistication. In Photoshop alone, I can think of
    at least 10 different ways of playing with color balance.

    Since I have no idea of what programs the poster may or may not have,
    nor his degree of familiarity with any he might, and since I have no
    idea how much time he wishes to take learning about this, I provided as
    quick and dirty an answer as possible. ;-)

    Art


    John McWilliams wrote:
    > Arthur Entlich wrote:
    >
    >> If the image is too blue, you need to add yellow in the driver. If
    >> the tint is more cyan, you need to add red, if it is magenta add
    >> green, and vice versa. If between these add a mixture. You should be
    >> able to get something closer to neutral grayscale with driver
    >> adjustment, however, if you are using 3rd party inks, you may not be
    >> able to match the ink with the profiles Epson provides.
    >>
    > Would not using a Curve adj. in Photoshop achieve the same thing?
    >
  18. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Since your images are in greyscale already, and I assume you are seeing
    something approaching greyscale on your monitor, I would be more apt to
    try to make ink adjustments in the printer driver to see if you can find
    a "easy" answer.

    Art

    MikeD wrote:

    > "John McWilliams" <jpmcw@comcast.net> wrote in message
    > news:ZcydnSBmi4s8RpXfRVn-jQ@comcast.com...
    >
    >
    >>Would not using a Curve adj. in Photoshop achieve the same thing?
    >
    >
    > The images are grey scale, I would have to convert them to colour first.
    >
    > Something else to try...
    >
    > Mike
    >
    >
  19. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    I'm, assuming the poster has a few black and white photos he scanned and
    wished to make neutral copies of. If so (and maybe I'm wrong), he isn't
    going to make a piezo B&W printer out of his color printer. He also
    likely isn't going to invest the time and possibly money in trying to
    get perfect color management.

    I was trying to provide him with the simplest solution for getting rid
    of a color cast. Using the driver sliders is not something I usually
    recommend, but it can be a fast fix, and can sometimes work.

    I suggest trying very small thumbnails, and seeing how they look. He
    may just hit something close enough to be OK. Some Epson printers have
    good enough profiles, if you use their inks and their papers to get
    something approaching B&W using their color inks.

    Depending on the nature of the image, especially if it is an old image
    anyway, sometimes pushing the image to look sepia can look quite nice.
    If the poster has an image program, they may provide him with a duotone,
    tritone or quadtone set of filters. I find that if you are stuck with
    color casts, if you at least push them in a direction toward something
    people recognize or accept as "normal" (Sepia can vary in warmth quite a
    bit) it can be acceptable. A pure greyscale is hard to produce with
    color inks, although I have seen perfect ones coming from Epson printers
    when set up correctly.

    Art


    Hecate wrote:

    > On Tue, 08 Feb 2005 12:42:31 GMT, Arthur Entlich <artistic@telus.net>
    > wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >>Epson's own inks may give you better results, since their printer ink
    >>profiles and papers are designed together.
    >>
    >
    > I've seen better results than Epson with Permajet Blax and Permajet
    > papers actually (or Permajet Blax and several other makes of papers as
    > well.)
    >
    > The problem with the 890 is that it's using colour so you're into
    > colour management. Generally, I find that allowing the printer to do
    > any colour management whatsoever is a big mistake.
    >
    > The best solution is a dedicated B&W printer using, for example, the
    > inks mentio0ned above. Next best is properly colour managing. Worst is
    > adjusting the printer management because you can be sure that it'll be
    > different for almost every print.
    >
    > --
    >
    > Hecate - The Real One
    > Hecate@newsguy.com
    > veni, vidi, reliqui
  20. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Hi Mike,

    I sort of assumed this was the case... (in the meantime everyone was
    getting on MY case because I gave you advice that is a bit "gauche".)

    I still suggest playing around a bit with the color sliders in the
    driver (makes some very small images to test, so you aren't wasting a
    lot of paper, but use the paper you will print the final copies on).

    If you have an image program, and they look neutral there, another
    option is to cheat another way using the same idea I suggested before
    but at the image software level.

    If the image is coming out tinted "blue" on the printer, convert the
    image to RGB and in color balance or whatever options you have in the
    program warm the image up on the screen with yellow. Try a thumbnail.
    After a few tries you should be able to get something close.

    As I said before, if the whole print is pretty universal in the tint,
    you're in luck, because then moving the color, or printer slider should
    give you a universal improvement. However, if only certain densities of
    grey are off, or some are off one way and some the other, that's not an
    easy fix.

    Art


    MikeD wrote:

    > "Hecate" <hecate@newsguy.com> wrote in message
    > news:bdti01draujsrr0qchpil8ao2on7ksmg3k@4ax.com...
    >
    >
    >>The best solution is a dedicated B&W printer using, for example, the
    >>inks mentio0ned above. Next best is properly colour managing. Worst is
    >>adjusting the printer management because you can be sure that it'll be
    >>different for almost every print.
    >
    >
    > Thanks to all for your helpful suggestions. My problem really is that I only
    > have 3 B&W photos to print. They are long (about 44") which is something the
    > Epson 890 can do, but given a choice between spending weeks of my life
    > learning and applying colour management or getting a lab to print them for
    > me, I might go for the latter!
    >
    > Mike
    >
    >
  21. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    "Arthur Entlich" <artistic@telus.net> wrote in message
    news:n_nOd.33005$L_3.32818@clgrps13...

    > I sort of assumed this was the case... (in the meantime everyone was
    > getting on MY case because I gave you advice that is a bit "gauche".)

    I don't see why anyone should give you a hard time. You have always offered
    very sensible advice here, and I appreciate the time you spend providing it.

    Initially I thought the multi-black cartridge set sounded like a good idea,
    but I didn't think about cleaning the heads when swapping between B&W and
    colour...

    > As I said before, if the whole print is pretty universal in the tint,
    > you're in luck, because then moving the color, or printer slider should
    > give you a universal improvement. However, if only certain densities of
    > grey are off, or some are off one way and some the other, that's not an
    > easy fix.

    The tint is universal, and slightly blue. I will try adjusting the sliders
    as you suggest.

    Mike
  22. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Hi Mike,

    Try giving the yellow a little nudge up (or blue down, depending on the
    driver), and see if that gets you closer. It may take a few tweaks to
    get close. Use thumbnails of the images, so you don't waste much ink.

    Let me know how it goes. If you have a imaging program, and you can get
    a fairly reasonably accurate color scan of part of the test print into
    it, you can then go into color balance or whatever the program provides
    for fixing color casts, and move the sliders around. When you get
    something approaching neutral grey, take note of which sliders required
    what, and then translate that to the Epson driver is similar
    percentages, and it may get you on your way.

    Color adjustment is second nature for me, having worked in the printing
    and photographic fields and as an artist for decades, but for some,
    color balancing can be a bit like chasing one's tail (assuming one had
    one, that is ;-))

    Art

    MikeD wrote:

    > "Arthur Entlich" <artistic@telus.net> wrote in message
    > news:n_nOd.33005$L_3.32818@clgrps13...
    >
    >
    >>I sort of assumed this was the case... (in the meantime everyone was
    >>getting on MY case because I gave you advice that is a bit "gauche".)
    >
    >
    > I don't see why anyone should give you a hard time. You have always offered
    > very sensible advice here, and I appreciate the time you spend providing it.
    >
    > Initially I thought the multi-black cartridge set sounded like a good idea,
    > but I didn't think about cleaning the heads when swapping between B&W and
    > colour...
    >
    >
    >>As I said before, if the whole print is pretty universal in the tint,
    >>you're in luck, because then moving the color, or printer slider should
    >>give you a universal improvement. However, if only certain densities of
    >>grey are off, or some are off one way and some the other, that's not an
    >>easy fix.
    >
    >
    > The tint is universal, and slightly blue. I will try adjusting the sliders
    > as you suggest.
    >
    > Mike
    >
    >
  23. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    "Arthur Entlich" <artistic@telus.net> wrote in message
    news:NEGOd.34915$L_3.22509@clgrps13...
    > Hi Mike,

    > Let me know how it goes. If you have a imaging program, and you can get
    > a fairly reasonably accurate color scan of part of the test print into
    > it, you can then go into color balance or whatever the program provides
    > for fixing color casts, and move the sliders around. When you get
    > something approaching neutral grey, take note of which sliders required
    > what, and then translate that to the Epson driver is similar
    > percentages, and it may get you on your way.

    Now that's a good idea, because I will be able to see the results on the
    monitor as I make the adjustments.

    I have an Epson 1640 scanner so should be able to get a good quality scan.
    I'll let you know what happens.

    BTW Art, I followed the instructions in your manual for cleaning my old 440
    and it's made a huge improvement. The printer's new owner is delighted with
    it.

    Thanks,

    Mike
  24. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    That always is nice to hear. The older Epson printers can be made "good
    as new" in many cases with just a bit of cleaning. The heads are
    actually pretty robust most of the time.

    Art

    MikeD wrote:
    > "Arthur Entlich" <artistic@telus.net> wrote in message
    > news:NEGOd.34915$L_3.22509@clgrps13...
    >
    >>Hi Mike,
    >
    >
    >
    > BTW Art, I followed the instructions in your manual for cleaning my old 440
    > and it's made a huge improvement. The printer's new owner is delighted with
    > it.
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > Mike
    >
    >
  25. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    "Arthur Entlich" <artistic@telus.net> wrote in message
    news:jL2Pd.44132$gA4.1831@edtnps89...
    > That always is nice to hear. The older Epson printers can be made "good
    > as new" in many cases with just a bit of cleaning. The heads are
    > actually pretty robust most of the time.

    I played with my grey scales at the weekend, printing a 17 shade wedge on
    photo paper.

    With the printer driver set to "no colour control" the darker shades have a
    greenish tint, while the lighter shdes have a reddish tint. It's fairly
    subtle, but noticeable.

    I played with the sliders in the driver until I got bored, but couldn't find
    a setting that would give proper greys right across the spectrum.

    I might save up for some genuine Epson ink then try again...

    Mike
  26. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Hi MIke,

    I'm not surprised you got bored. As you probably recall, I stated:

    >>
    >>>As I said before, if the whole print is pretty universal in the tint,
    >>>you're in luck, because then moving the color, or printer slider should
    >>>give you a universal improvement. However, if only certain densities of
    >>>grey are off, or some are off one way and some the other, that's not an
    >>>easy fix.
    >>
    >>

    and you said:

    >> The tint is universal, and slightly blue. I will try adjusting the sliders
    >> as you suggest.
    >>


    Now that you have confirmed the color balance is shifting with density,
    it means the inks have different profiles than the Epson inks, most
    likely. Keep in mind paper type shifts color response also.

    Make sure all your nozzle checks are good as well. If some nozzles are
    clogged, that can throw off the color balance, especially with 6 color
    printers which use low dye load inks.

    Good luck.

    Art


    MikeD wrote:

    > "Arthur Entlich" <artistic@telus.net> wrote in message
    > news:jL2Pd.44132$gA4.1831@edtnps89...
    >
    >>That always is nice to hear. The older Epson printers can be made "good
    >>as new" in many cases with just a bit of cleaning. The heads are
    >>actually pretty robust most of the time.
    >
    >
    > I played with my grey scales at the weekend, printing a 17 shade wedge on
    > photo paper.
    >
    > With the printer driver set to "no colour control" the darker shades have a
    > greenish tint, while the lighter shdes have a reddish tint. It's fairly
    > subtle, but noticeable.
    >
    > I played with the sliders in the driver until I got bored, but couldn't find
    > a setting that would give proper greys right across the spectrum.
    >
    > I might save up for some genuine Epson ink then try again...
    >
    > Mike
    >
    >
  27. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    "Arthur Entlich" <artistic@telus.net> wrote in message
    news:vylQd.405$%y.2@clgrps12...

    > and you said:
    >
    > >> The tint is universal, and slightly blue. I will try adjusting the
    sliders
    > >> as you suggest.

    Hello Art

    I did say that, and I was referring to the appearance of my photograph.

    > Now that you have confirmed the color balance is shifting with density,
    > it means the inks have different profiles than the Epson inks, most
    > likely. Keep in mind paper type shifts color response also.

    This only became apparent to me when I printed out the grey scale wedge.
    Funny things, eyes!

    > Make sure all your nozzle checks are good as well. If some nozzles are
    > clogged, that can throw off the color balance, especially with 6 color
    > printers which use low dye load inks.

    The nozzle checks are fine. Colour prints are wonderful. It's only B&W that
    is challenging me!

    I will buy *one* set of Epson ink and try that. If that doesn't work I shall
    find something more interesting to occupy my spare time.

    Thanks again,

    Mike
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