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Assign hard drive ID

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April 23, 2005 6:00:02 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

I have a new external hard drive.
I have no problem connect, but it only takes driver ID as computer E drive.
However, I already have had another device that use driver E as its ID.

I would like to change this new hard drive ID from E to other say G or H.
The driver company say it is Windows do this change.

Can anyone tell me how to change driver ID?

Thanks

More about : assign hard drive

Anonymous
April 23, 2005 6:32:36 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

It's not the drive that gets assigned a letter, it's the partition(s) on the drive. Windows 98 has a fixed method for assigning hard drive letters. Only time you can assign letters is when the drive is a "removable" drive (though that doesn't include floppy drives.) CD drives, memory cards, DVD drives, etc.

In other words, the company was wrong regarding Windows 98. In Windows 2000 or XP, you *can* reassign hard drive partition letters, but not in Win95/98/98SE/ME

What kind of drive was E:\ before?

--
Gary S. Terhune
MS MVP Shell/User
http://www.grystmill.com/articles/cleanboot.htm
http://www.grystmill.com/articles/security.htm

"Terry" <Terry@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message news:66FACF54-7F0C-443B-B9CD-2435F513A2D1@microsoft.com...
> I have a new external hard drive.
> I have no problem connect, but it only takes driver ID as computer E drive.
> However, I already have had another device that use driver E as its ID.
>
> I would like to change this new hard drive ID from E to other say G or H.
> The driver company say it is Windows do this change.
>
> Can anyone tell me how to change driver ID?
>
> Thanks
April 23, 2005 10:29:02 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

The new hard drive is removable I can disconncet through "safely remove".
So if this is what you mean removable, what should I do?

te E:\ before is another hard drive that cannot be remove.
I want to transfre some file from old one to new, and if both want to be E:\
what is the point to get new one.

"Gary S. Terhune" wrote:

> It's not the drive that gets assigned a letter, it's the partition(s) on the drive.
> Windows 98 has a fixed method for assigning hard drive letters. Only time
> you can assign letters is when the drive is a "removable" drive (though that
> doesn't include floppy drives.) CD drives, memory cards, DVD drives, etc.
>
> In other words, the company was wrong regarding Windows 98. In Windows
> 2000 or XP, you *can* reassign hard drive partition letters, but not in
> Win95/98/98SE/ME
>
> What kind of drive was E:\ before
Related resources
Anonymous
April 23, 2005 10:54:36 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

See if this freeware will work for your situation --
Letter Assigner - Freeware:
http://www.v72735.f2s.com/LetAssig/

"Letter Assigner allows to assign in the system ( with a few non-significant
exceptions ). It gives the users of Microsoft ® Windows ® 95, Windows ® 98 and
Windows ® ME the freedom to choose drive letters.

"Letter Assigner remembers drives by their serial numbers or by the labels, which
provides protection against letter changes after repartitioning or connecting new
drives. "
--
Glen Ventura, MS MVP Shell/User, A+
http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
http://www.microsoft.com/communities/conduct/default.ms...


"Terry" <Terry@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:66FACF54-7F0C-443B-B9CD-2435F513A2D1@microsoft.com...
> I have a new external hard drive.
> I have no problem connect, but it only takes driver ID as computer E drive.
> However, I already have had another device that use driver E as its ID.
>
> I would like to change this new hard drive ID from E to other say G or H.
> The driver company say it is Windows do this change.
>
> Can anyone tell me how to change driver ID?
>
> Thanks
Anonymous
April 23, 2005 10:54:37 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

Hmmm... Gonna have to give that one a try. Almost sounds too good to be true, <g>.

--
Gary S. Terhune
MS MVP Shell/User
http://www.grystmill.com/articles/cleanboot.htm
http://www.grystmill.com/articles/security.htm

"glee" <glee29@spamindspring.com> wrote in message news:o mwTNdFSFHA.996@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> See if this freeware will work for your situation --
> Letter Assigner - Freeware:
> http://www.v72735.f2s.com/LetAssig/
>
> "Letter Assigner allows to assign in the system ( with a few non-significant
> exceptions ). It gives the users of Microsoft ® Windows ® 95, Windows ® 98 and
> Windows ® ME the freedom to choose drive letters.
>
> "Letter Assigner remembers drives by their serial numbers or by the labels, which
> provides protection against letter changes after repartitioning or connecting new
> drives. "
> --
> Glen Ventura, MS MVP Shell/User, A+
> http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
> http://www.microsoft.com/communities/conduct/default.ms...
>
>
> "Terry" <Terry@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
> news:66FACF54-7F0C-443B-B9CD-2435F513A2D1@microsoft.com...
> > I have a new external hard drive.
> > I have no problem connect, but it only takes driver ID as computer E drive.
> > However, I already have had another device that use driver E as its ID.
> >
> > I would like to change this new hard drive ID from E to other say G or H.
> > The driver company say it is Windows do this change.
> >
> > Can anyone tell me how to change driver ID?
> >
> > Thanks
>
Anonymous
April 23, 2005 10:56:57 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

A drive is a "removable" drive if the media can be removed: CDROM, DVD, flash card reader, USB stick. A hard drive is never a removable drive, regardless of whether or not it's a USB drive that can be "removed". Remember, Windows 98 was developed when USB hard drives didn't exist.

The rule for lettering drives in Win9x is as follows:

A & B are reserved for floppy drives.
C:\ is *always* the partition where the OS loads from.
Next come remaining Primary partitions on the Primary IDE/Master drive (except Extended, if present.)
After that come remaining Primary partitions on the Primary IDE/Slave drive, the one marked Active, if any, being first.
And so forth for all hard drives. Secondary Master, Secondary Slave, then USB drives, all in the order in which they load.
After all the Primary Partitions come Extended Volumes (partitions inside an Extended Partition), again lettered in the order in which they load.

(To be honest, I can't recall for sure if Primary Slave loads before Secondary Master.)

It would appear that your current E:\ drive is an Extended Volume, and your USB drive is a Primary partition. Besides trying Glen's suggestion for a drive lettering assignment utility, you could easily push your USB drive to the end by repartitioning it and making the entire drive an Extended partition, then partitioning the Extended space into Volumes. They would then load last of all hard drive partitions, before removable drives.

--
Gary S. Terhune
MS MVP Shell/User
http://www.grystmill.com/articles/cleanboot.htm
http://www.grystmill.com/articles/security.htm

"Terry" <Terry@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message news:4EA99489-05EA-45EA-8358-9C60185D279A@microsoft.com...
> The new hard drive is removable I can disconncet through "safely remove".
> So if this is what you mean removable, what should I do?
>
> te E:\ before is another hard drive that cannot be remove.
> I want to transfre some file from old one to new, and if both want to be E:\
> what is the point to get new one.
>
> "Gary S. Terhune" wrote:
>
> > It's not the drive that gets assigned a letter, it's the partition(s) on the drive.
> > Windows 98 has a fixed method for assigning hard drive letters. Only time
> > you can assign letters is when the drive is a "removable" drive (though that
> > doesn't include floppy drives.) CD drives, memory cards, DVD drives, etc.
> >
> > In other words, the company was wrong regarding Windows 98. In Windows
> > 2000 or XP, you *can* reassign hard drive partition letters, but not in
> > Win95/98/98SE/ME
> >
> > What kind of drive was E:\ before
Anonymous
April 24, 2005 2:55:16 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

"Gary S. Terhune" <grystnews@mvps.org> wrote in message news:o $NzgDHSFHA.576@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...

>The rule for lettering drives in Win9x is as follows:
>
>A & B are reserved for floppy drives.
>C:\ is *always* the partition where the OS loads from.
>
>Next come remaining Primary partitions on the Primary IDE/Master drive
>(except Extended, if present.) After that come remaining Primary
>partitions on the Primary IDE/Slave drive, the one marked Active, if
>any, being first. And so forth for all hard drives. Secondary Master,
>Secondary Slave, then USB drives, all in the order in which they load.
>After all the Primary Partitions come Extended Volumes (partitions
>inside an Extended Partition), again lettered in the order in which
>they load.

Actually, it goes like this for 9x, (and is the default for NT, before
it does its reassignment.)

Active primary on HD0 (C:) 
First physical primary(s) on HD1, HD2, HD3
All logicals within the extended in order. (HD0, HD1, etc..)
Then remaining primarys (HD0, HD1, etc...)


>(To be honest, I can't recall for sure if Primary Slave loads before
>Secondary Master.)

From memory..me niether ;)  .. I know that the primary master is HD0
(aka by the BIOS; 0x80) Assuming all fixed disks, I *think* the
primary slave is HD1 (0x81), and the secondary master 0x82.. but
I'd have to look it up to be certain..
Anonymous
April 24, 2005 2:55:17 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

Ahh... So Active partitions (or first Primary on drive if no Active) get enumerated first. Makes sense, I guess.

--
Gary S. Terhune
MS MVP Shell/User
http://www.grystmill.com/articles/cleanboot.htm
http://www.grystmill.com/articles/security.htm

"Bill Blanton" <bblanton@REMOVEmagicnet.net> wrote in message news:eilKKkHSFHA.3088@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
>
> "Gary S. Terhune" <grystnews@mvps.org> wrote in message news:o $NzgDHSFHA.576@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
>
> >The rule for lettering drives in Win9x is as follows:
> >
> >A & B are reserved for floppy drives.
> >C:\ is *always* the partition where the OS loads from.
> >
> >Next come remaining Primary partitions on the Primary IDE/Master drive
> >(except Extended, if present.) After that come remaining Primary
> >partitions on the Primary IDE/Slave drive, the one marked Active, if
> >any, being first. And so forth for all hard drives. Secondary Master,
> >Secondary Slave, then USB drives, all in the order in which they load.
> >After all the Primary Partitions come Extended Volumes (partitions
> >inside an Extended Partition), again lettered in the order in which
> >they load.
>
> Actually, it goes like this for 9x, (and is the default for NT, before
> it does its reassignment.)
>
> Active primary on HD0 (C:) 
> First physical primary(s) on HD1, HD2, HD3
> All logicals within the extended in order. (HD0, HD1, etc..)
> Then remaining primarys (HD0, HD1, etc...)
>
>
> >(To be honest, I can't recall for sure if Primary Slave loads before
> >Secondary Master.)
>
> From memory..me niether ;)  .. I know that the primary master is HD0
> (aka by the BIOS; 0x80) Assuming all fixed disks, I *think* the
> primary slave is HD1 (0x81), and the secondary master 0x82.. but
> I'd have to look it up to be certain..
>
>
>
>
Anonymous
April 24, 2005 4:15:38 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

I guess you could say the "active" partition on HD0 getting C: is
just a consequence of "itself" being loaded as the system drive.

After that, whether there are others "active" or not shouldn't matter.
(but iirc it may cause some flakiness in ordering to have more than one
active.) You could have a visible primary (for example) on HD0 that
precedes the active partition, but it won't get enumerated until
after all ext/logicals. Being "active" is the one exception to the
rules.



"Gary S. Terhune" <grystnews@mvps.org> wrote in message news:o g9RE6HSFHA.3088@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
Ahh... So Active partitions (or first Primary on drive if no Active) get enumerated first. Makes sense, I guess.

--
Gary S. Terhune
MS MVP Shell/User
http://www.grystmill.com/articles/cleanboot.htm
http://www.grystmill.com/articles/security.htm

"Bill Blanton" <bblanton@REMOVEmagicnet.net> wrote in message news:eilKKkHSFHA.3088@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
>
> "Gary S. Terhune" <grystnews@mvps.org> wrote in message news:o $NzgDHSFHA.576@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
>
> >The rule for lettering drives in Win9x is as follows:
> >
> >A & B are reserved for floppy drives.
> >C:\ is *always* the partition where the OS loads from.
> >
> >Next come remaining Primary partitions on the Primary IDE/Master drive
> >(except Extended, if present.) After that come remaining Primary
> >partitions on the Primary IDE/Slave drive, the one marked Active, if
> >any, being first. And so forth for all hard drives. Secondary Master,
> >Secondary Slave, then USB drives, all in the order in which they load.
> >After all the Primary Partitions come Extended Volumes (partitions
> >inside an Extended Partition), again lettered in the order in which
> >they load.
>
> Actually, it goes like this for 9x, (and is the default for NT, before
> it does its reassignment.)
>
> Active primary on HD0 (C:) 
> First physical primary(s) on HD1, HD2, HD3
> All logicals within the extended in order. (HD0, HD1, etc..)
> Then remaining primarys (HD0, HD1, etc...)
>
>
> >(To be honest, I can't recall for sure if Primary Slave loads before
> >Secondary Master.)
>
> From memory..me niether ;)  .. I know that the primary master is HD0
> (aka by the BIOS; 0x80) Assuming all fixed disks, I *think* the
> primary slave is HD1 (0x81), and the secondary master 0x82.. but
> I'd have to look it up to be certain..
>
>
>
>
Anonymous
April 24, 2005 5:08:48 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

Order in Which MS-DOS and Windows Assign Drive Letters:
http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=51978

<paste>

3. Regardless of whether a second floppy disk drive is present, MS-DOS then assigns
the drive letter C to the primary MS-DOS partition on the first physical hard disk,
and then goes on to check for a second hard disk.

4. If a second physical hard disk is found, and a primary partition exists on the
second physical drive, the primary MS-DOS partition on the second physical hard
drive is assigned the letter D. MS-DOS version 5.0, which supports up to eight
physical drives, will continue to search for more physical hard disk drives at this
point. For example, if a third physical hard disk is found, and a primary partition
exists on the third physical drive, the primary MS-DOS partition on the third
physical hard drive is assigned the letter E.

5. MS-DOS returns to the first physical hard disk drive and assigns drive letters to
any additional logical drives (in extended MS-DOS partitions) on that drive in
sequence.

6. MS-DOS repeats this process for the second physical hard disk drive, if present.
MS-DOS 5.0 will repeat this process for up to eight physical hard drives, if
present. After all logical drives (in extended MS-DOS partitions) have been assigned
drive letters, MS-DOS 5.0 returns to the first physical drive and assigns drive
letters to any other primary MS-DOS partitions that exist, then searches other
physical drives for additional primary MS-DOS partitions. This support for multiple
primary MS-DOS partitions was added to version 5.0 for backward compatibility with
the previous OEM MS-DOS versions that support multiple primary partitions.

</paste>
--
Glen Ventura, MS MVP Shell/User, A+
http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
http://www.microsoft.com/communities/conduct/default.ms...


"Bill Blanton" <bblanton@REMOVEmagicnet.net> wrote in message
news:eilKKkHSFHA.3088@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
>
> "Gary S. Terhune" <grystnews@mvps.org> wrote in message
news:o $NzgDHSFHA.576@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
>
> >The rule for lettering drives in Win9x is as follows:
> >
> >A & B are reserved for floppy drives.
> >C:\ is *always* the partition where the OS loads from.
> >
> >Next come remaining Primary partitions on the Primary IDE/Master drive
> >(except Extended, if present.) After that come remaining Primary
> >partitions on the Primary IDE/Slave drive, the one marked Active, if
> >any, being first. And so forth for all hard drives. Secondary Master,
> >Secondary Slave, then USB drives, all in the order in which they load.
> >After all the Primary Partitions come Extended Volumes (partitions
> >inside an Extended Partition), again lettered in the order in which
> >they load.
>
> Actually, it goes like this for 9x, (and is the default for NT, before
> it does its reassignment.)
>
> Active primary on HD0 (C:) 
> First physical primary(s) on HD1, HD2, HD3
> All logicals within the extended in order. (HD0, HD1, etc..)
> Then remaining primarys (HD0, HD1, etc...)
>
>
> >(To be honest, I can't recall for sure if Primary Slave loads before
> >Secondary Master.)
>
> From memory..me niether ;)  .. I know that the primary master is HD0
> (aka by the BIOS; 0x80) Assuming all fixed disks, I *think* the
> primary slave is HD1 (0x81), and the secondary master 0x82.. but
> I'd have to look it up to be certain..
>
>
>
>
Anonymous
April 24, 2005 5:08:49 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

OK, that does it. When I go to rebuild this system in June, I'm going to figure it out for myself, <g>. Put four Primary partitions on each of my four internal drives, see what happens. (Can't play too much with the external drives, since they'll have my backups.)

--
Gary S. Terhune
MS MVP Shell/User
http://www.grystmill.com/articles/cleanboot.htm
http://www.grystmill.com/articles/security.htm

"glee" <glee29@spamindspring.com> wrote in message news:%23TobLuISFHA.688@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> Order in Which MS-DOS and Windows Assign Drive Letters:
> http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=51978
>
> <paste>
>
> 3. Regardless of whether a second floppy disk drive is present, MS-DOS then assigns
> the drive letter C to the primary MS-DOS partition on the first physical hard disk,
> and then goes on to check for a second hard disk.
>
> 4. If a second physical hard disk is found, and a primary partition exists on the
> second physical drive, the primary MS-DOS partition on the second physical hard
> drive is assigned the letter D. MS-DOS version 5.0, which supports up to eight
> physical drives, will continue to search for more physical hard disk drives at this
> point. For example, if a third physical hard disk is found, and a primary partition
> exists on the third physical drive, the primary MS-DOS partition on the third
> physical hard drive is assigned the letter E.
>
> 5. MS-DOS returns to the first physical hard disk drive and assigns drive letters to
> any additional logical drives (in extended MS-DOS partitions) on that drive in
> sequence.
>
> 6. MS-DOS repeats this process for the second physical hard disk drive, if present.
> MS-DOS 5.0 will repeat this process for up to eight physical hard drives, if
> present. After all logical drives (in extended MS-DOS partitions) have been assigned
> drive letters, MS-DOS 5.0 returns to the first physical drive and assigns drive
> letters to any other primary MS-DOS partitions that exist, then searches other
> physical drives for additional primary MS-DOS partitions. This support for multiple
> primary MS-DOS partitions was added to version 5.0 for backward compatibility with
> the previous OEM MS-DOS versions that support multiple primary partitions.
>
> </paste>
> --
> Glen Ventura, MS MVP Shell/User, A+
> http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
> http://www.microsoft.com/communities/conduct/default.ms...
>
>
> "Bill Blanton" <bblanton@REMOVEmagicnet.net> wrote in message
> news:eilKKkHSFHA.3088@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> >
> > "Gary S. Terhune" <grystnews@mvps.org> wrote in message
> news:o $NzgDHSFHA.576@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> >
> > >The rule for lettering drives in Win9x is as follows:
> > >
> > >A & B are reserved for floppy drives.
> > >C:\ is *always* the partition where the OS loads from.
> > >
> > >Next come remaining Primary partitions on the Primary IDE/Master drive
> > >(except Extended, if present.) After that come remaining Primary
> > >partitions on the Primary IDE/Slave drive, the one marked Active, if
> > >any, being first. And so forth for all hard drives. Secondary Master,
> > >Secondary Slave, then USB drives, all in the order in which they load.
> > >After all the Primary Partitions come Extended Volumes (partitions
> > >inside an Extended Partition), again lettered in the order in which
> > >they load.
> >
> > Actually, it goes like this for 9x, (and is the default for NT, before
> > it does its reassignment.)
> >
> > Active primary on HD0 (C:) 
> > First physical primary(s) on HD1, HD2, HD3
> > All logicals within the extended in order. (HD0, HD1, etc..)
> > Then remaining primarys (HD0, HD1, etc...)
> >
> >
> > >(To be honest, I can't recall for sure if Primary Slave loads before
> > >Secondary Master.)
> >
> > From memory..me niether ;)  .. I know that the primary master is HD0
> > (aka by the BIOS; 0x80) Assuming all fixed disks, I *think* the
> > primary slave is HD1 (0x81), and the secondary master 0x82.. but
> > I'd have to look it up to be certain..
> >
> >
> >
> >
>
Anonymous
April 24, 2005 11:01:37 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

Have similar Firewire drive that takes the drive letter "M". It takes
second fiddle when I plug in the video camera to recover video/pictures.
Then the firewire drive partition takes the drive letter "N". As Gary
surmised, the hard drive has an extended partition with a dos logical drive.
Hard drives etc. on an external bus, like USB or Firewire, should be taking
second fiddle to onboard connected hard drives. Irregardless the history of
when a particular hard drive is connected, internally or externally.

To answer your question about drive letter assignment, you need to go to
device manager under disk drives. (Hard drive IDs are not drive letter
assignments) Select the hard drive that is connected to the USB. Then
select "removable". This will "ungray" the drive letter assignment below
it. Then you can assign a drive letter not already assigned to other
devices. Reboot/restart the PC. I have not done this as its obvious from
the label name, so I can tell the difference from the video camera and the
Firewire drive.

To avoid confusion with multiple hard drives with multiple partitions in a
PC regarding partition types, put primaries only on the first physical hard
drive, followed by one extended partition if you still have empty space
remaining. The remaining hard drives should have extended partitions only.
The only exception would be a temporarily connected hard drive for cloning,
which windows should never "see". This has worked great for years for me.
"Terry" <Terry@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:66FACF54-7F0C-443B-B9CD-2435F513A2D1@microsoft.com...
> I have a new external hard drive.
> I have no problem connect, but it only takes driver ID as computer E
drive.
> However, I already have had another device that use driver E as its ID.
>
> I would like to change this new hard drive ID from E to other say G or H.
> The driver company say it is Windows do this change.
>
> Can anyone tell me how to change driver ID?
>
> Thanks
Anonymous
April 24, 2005 12:12:33 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

We agree then. ;)  That's basically what I said, except they don't
mention in 3. that C will be the "active" bootable/system primary.

I use the fact that all "first" primarys are enumerated first to
force my shared paging file (located in the first primary on the second
drive) to be lettered as D:, which never changes. No matter how I
re-arrange partitions/volumes on the drives, or if I add or subtract
a third drive with any configuration.. the swap file is always on D:,
as long as I am booting from HD0.



"glee" <glee29@spamindspring.com> wrote in message news:%23TobLuISFHA.688@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> Order in Which MS-DOS and Windows Assign Drive Letters:
> http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=51978
>
> <paste>
>
> 3. Regardless of whether a second floppy disk drive is present, MS-DOS then assigns
> the drive letter C to the primary MS-DOS partition on the first physical hard disk,
> and then goes on to check for a second hard disk.
>
> 4. If a second physical hard disk is found, and a primary partition exists on the
> second physical drive, the primary MS-DOS partition on the second physical hard
> drive is assigned the letter D. MS-DOS version 5.0, which supports up to eight
> physical drives, will continue to search for more physical hard disk drives at this
> point. For example, if a third physical hard disk is found, and a primary partition
> exists on the third physical drive, the primary MS-DOS partition on the third
> physical hard drive is assigned the letter E.
>
> 5. MS-DOS returns to the first physical hard disk drive and assigns drive letters to
> any additional logical drives (in extended MS-DOS partitions) on that drive in
> sequence.
>
> 6. MS-DOS repeats this process for the second physical hard disk drive, if present.
> MS-DOS 5.0 will repeat this process for up to eight physical hard drives, if
> present. After all logical drives (in extended MS-DOS partitions) have been assigned
> drive letters, MS-DOS 5.0 returns to the first physical drive and assigns drive
> letters to any other primary MS-DOS partitions that exist, then searches other
> physical drives for additional primary MS-DOS partitions. This support for multiple
> primary MS-DOS partitions was added to version 5.0 for backward compatibility with
> the previous OEM MS-DOS versions that support multiple primary partitions.
>
> </paste>
> --
> Glen Ventura, MS MVP Shell/User, A+
> http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
> http://www.microsoft.com/communities/conduct/default.ms...
>
>
> "Bill Blanton" <bblanton@REMOVEmagicnet.net> wrote in message
> news:eilKKkHSFHA.3088@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
>>
>> "Gary S. Terhune" <grystnews@mvps.org> wrote in message
> news:o $NzgDHSFHA.576@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
>>
>> >The rule for lettering drives in Win9x is as follows:
>> >
>> >A & B are reserved for floppy drives.
>> >C:\ is *always* the partition where the OS loads from.
>> >
>> >Next come remaining Primary partitions on the Primary IDE/Master drive
>> >(except Extended, if present.) After that come remaining Primary
>> >partitions on the Primary IDE/Slave drive, the one marked Active, if
>> >any, being first. And so forth for all hard drives. Secondary Master,
>> >Secondary Slave, then USB drives, all in the order in which they load.
>> >After all the Primary Partitions come Extended Volumes (partitions
>> >inside an Extended Partition), again lettered in the order in which
>> >they load.
>>
>> Actually, it goes like this for 9x, (and is the default for NT, before
>> it does its reassignment.)
>>
>> Active primary on HD0 (C:) 
>> First physical primary(s) on HD1, HD2, HD3
>> All logicals within the extended in order. (HD0, HD1, etc..)
>> Then remaining primarys (HD0, HD1, etc...)
>>
>>
>> >(To be honest, I can't recall for sure if Primary Slave loads before
>> >Secondary Master.)
>>
>> From memory..me niether ;)  .. I know that the primary master is HD0
>> (aka by the BIOS; 0x80) Assuming all fixed disks, I *think* the
>> primary slave is HD1 (0x81), and the secondary master 0x82.. but
>> I'd have to look it up to be certain..
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
Anonymous
April 24, 2005 1:08:19 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

Terry wrote:
> I have a new external hard drive.
> I have no problem connect, but it only takes driver ID as computer E
> drive. However, I already have had another device that use driver E
> as its ID.
>
> I would like to change this new hard drive ID from E to other say G
> or H. The driver company say it is Windows do this change.
>
> Can anyone tell me how to change driver ID?

Use Letter Assigner. It is free and lets you assign drive letters
and/or labels as you desire.

http://www.v72735.f2s.com/LetAssig/

--
dadiOH
____________________________

dadiOH's dandies v3.06...
....a help file of info about MP3s, recording from
LP/cassette and tips & tricks on this and that.
Get it at http://mysite.verizon.net/xico
Anonymous
April 24, 2005 1:12:58 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

Gary S. Terhune wrote:
> Hmmm... Gonna have to give that one a try. Almost sounds too good to
> be true, <g>.

It's true, works very nicely. Does its deed via autoexe.bat:

@C:\PROGRA~1\_MYPRO~1\SYSTEM\LETTER~1\LETASSIG.EXE @LETTERS.INI
/O:D RIVEMAP.DAT /CD

It's a good idea to *also* assign labels to the drives, just in case...

dadiOH
____________________

> "glee" <glee29@spamindspring.com> wrote in message
> news:o mwTNdFSFHA.996@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
>> See if this freeware will work for your situation --
>> Letter Assigner - Freeware:
>> http://www.v72735.f2s.com/LetAssig/
Anonymous
April 24, 2005 2:04:54 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

"Lil' Dave" <spamyourself@virus.net> wrote in message
news:%23z8DfWMSFHA.2348@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> snip <
> To answer your question about drive letter assignment, you need to go to
> device manager under disk drives. (Hard drive IDs are not drive letter
> assignments) Select the hard drive that is connected to the USB. Then
> select "removable". This will "ungray" the drive letter assignment below
> it. Then you can assign a drive letter not already assigned to other
> devices. Reboot/restart the PC.

I considered mentioning that method, Dave, but since I have only personally used it
on CD drives, cameras, and flash-drives/usb-sticks, I could not verify with
certainty that it was valid for external hard drives. Of course, once I think about
it, it would have to be valid for that option also. :-)

> I have not done this as its obvious from
> the label name, so I can tell the difference from the video camera and the
> Firewire drive.

Labels are the best way to avoid confusion, expecially if you have more than one of
the same type device.

> To avoid confusion with multiple hard drives with multiple partitions in a
> PC regarding partition types, put primaries only on the first physical hard
> drive, followed by one extended partition if you still have empty space
> remaining. The remaining hard drives should have extended partitions only.
> The only exception would be a temporarily connected hard drive for cloning,
> which windows should never "see". This has worked great for years for me.

I generally follow that method myself, but I know a lot of folks who create a
primary on the second physical drive also. See for example Bill Blanton's practice
of putting the swap file on a primary partition on the second physical drive (
mentioned in his reply in this thread).
--
Glen Ventura, MS MVP Shell/User, A+
http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
http://www.microsoft.com/communities/conduct/default.ms...


> "Terry" <Terry@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
> news:66FACF54-7F0C-443B-B9CD-2435F513A2D1@microsoft.com...
> > I have a new external hard drive.
> > I have no problem connect, but it only takes driver ID as computer E
> drive.
> > However, I already have had another device that use driver E as its ID.
> >
> > I would like to change this new hard drive ID from E to other say G or H.
> > The driver company say it is Windows do this change.
> >
> > Can anyone tell me how to change driver ID?
> >
> > Thanks
>
>
Anonymous
April 24, 2005 6:23:14 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

"Gary S. Terhune" <grystnews@mvps.org> wrote in
news:#2HmvAKSFHA.3076@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl:

> OK, that does it. When I go to rebuild this system in June, I'm going
> to figure it out for myself, <g>. Put four Primary partitions on each
> of my four internal drives, see what happens. (Can't play too much
> with the external drives, since they'll have my backups.)

Where's your CDRom going to figure in all this?
Or don't you use one of those? :-)

--
--- A Freudian slip is when you say one thing but mean your mother. ---
Anonymous
April 24, 2005 6:52:44 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

Fact is, I have an external USB2 Sony DVD burner that will do nicely.

Regardless, I have a lot more connectors available than I have drives for. 4 possible on the ATA connectors and 8 on the RAID, set to JABOD.

And, silly, I don't intend to leave them that way, just partition in various manners, with labels so I can tell them apart, then install Win98SE to a few different places. Get it all straight in my head, and then wipe the entire mess and rebuild into my usual 17 or 18 HDD partitions with a half dozen or so removable drives.

What can I say? I don't like wasting the alphabet, <g>.

--
Gary S. Terhune
MS MVP Shell/User
http://www.grystmill.com/articles/cleanboot.htm
http://www.grystmill.com/articles/security.htm

"Menno Hershberger" <mhersh22@nosuchplace.net> wrote in message news:Xns9642A6B48963Ebutter@daisymae.com...
> "Gary S. Terhune" <grystnews@mvps.org> wrote in
> news:#2HmvAKSFHA.3076@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl:
>
> > OK, that does it. When I go to rebuild this system in June, I'm going
> > to figure it out for myself, <g>. Put four Primary partitions on each
> > of my four internal drives, see what happens. (Can't play too much
> > with the external drives, since they'll have my backups.)
>
> Where's your CDRom going to figure in all this?
> Or don't you use one of those? :-)
>
> --
> --- A Freudian slip is when you say one thing but mean your mother. ---
April 24, 2005 11:29:03 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

I guess now the problem is not ID assign.

I use LetterAssigner assign new HD as H and make new label.
When I restart computer with old one, it show up as E individually;
or the new one as H individually.

But E and H never show up together when I restart with both connected.
Only E can show up, and nowhere I can find H.
What is the problem now?
Anonymous
April 24, 2005 11:55:28 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

Just to be sure, before you used the Letter Assigner utility, you could see both the new E:\ partition *and* what was E:\ but got assigned another letter by Windows?

Did you assign all the drives letters using Letter Assigner?

I think you'd be better off if you simply repartition the new drive as one big Extended Partition. Depending on how large it is, I'd subdivide that into several smaller Volumes (Logical Drives.)

How big is the new drive, and what Make/Model?

--
Gary S. Terhune
MS MVP Shell/User
http://www.grystmill.com/articles/cleanboot.htm
http://www.grystmill.com/articles/security.htm

"Terry" <Terry@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message news:E266ABC2-6FA6-44AF-A165-4ACE29CA83E2@microsoft.com...
> I guess now the problem is not ID assign.
>
> I use LetterAssigner assign new HD as H and make new label.
> When I restart computer with old one, it show up as E individually;
> or the new one as H individually.
>
> But E and H never show up together when I restart with both connected.
> Only E can show up, and nowhere I can find H.
> What is the problem now?
Anonymous
April 25, 2005 1:46:12 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

You should check out VPC for testing things like that..It supports up to 4
virtual HDs iirc. Partition and format 'em any way you want. I *think* MS
used to offer a timed trial version.

Unfortunately, I have more HDs than connectors.. I'll trade you ;) 


"Gary S. Terhune" <grystnews@mvps.org> wrote in message news:o sJ9ofRSFHA.3156@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
Fact is, I have an external USB2 Sony DVD burner that will do nicely.

Regardless, I have a lot more connectors available than I have drives for. 4 possible on the ATA connectors and 8 on the RAID, set
to JABOD.

And, silly, I don't intend to leave them that way, just partition in various manners, with labels so I can tell them apart, then
install Win98SE to a few different places. Get it all straight in my head, and then wipe the entire mess and rebuild into my usual
17 or 18 HDD partitions with a half dozen or so removable drives.

What can I say? I don't like wasting the alphabet, <g>.

--
Gary S. Terhune
MS MVP Shell/User
http://www.grystmill.com/articles/cleanboot.htm
http://www.grystmill.com/articles/security.htm

"Menno Hershberger" <mhersh22@nosuchplace.net> wrote in message news:Xns9642A6B48963Ebutter@daisymae.com...
> "Gary S. Terhune" <grystnews@mvps.org> wrote in
> news:#2HmvAKSFHA.3076@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl:
>
> > OK, that does it. When I go to rebuild this system in June, I'm going
> > to figure it out for myself, <g>. Put four Primary partitions on each
> > of my four internal drives, see what happens. (Can't play too much
> > with the external drives, since they'll have my backups.)
>
> Where's your CDRom going to figure in all this?
> Or don't you use one of those? :-)
>
> --
> --- A Freudian slip is when you say one thing but mean your mother. ---
Anonymous
April 25, 2005 1:46:13 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

I intend to install VPC when I get my new office set up--but not on my production machine, <s>. (It's an Asus AT7, by the way.)

Actually, I may buy a new machine and turn this one into a server, though I'm not certain what flavor. Probably SBS. The VPC machine will be one I cobble together from parts, though a new mobo and PWS will likely be required. In fact, I may eschew getting a new system and put together *two* new ones from parts. I'd only need two new mobos, PWSs and RAM. Add some SATA drives later.

Money looks to be tight for a while.

--
Gary S. Terhune
MS MVP Shell/User
http://www.grystmill.com/articles/cleanboot.htm
http://www.grystmill.com/articles/security.htm

"Bill Blanton" <bblanton@REMOVEmagicnet.net> wrote in message news:o 6rJOiTSFHA.3664@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> You should check out VPC for testing things like that..It supports up to 4
> virtual HDs iirc. Partition and format 'em any way you want. I *think* MS
> used to offer a timed trial version.
>
> Unfortunately, I have more HDs than connectors.. I'll trade you ;) 
>
Anonymous
April 25, 2005 3:23:46 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

Yeah..Money.. I've heard of it, but don't have much experience with it.
:-)



"Gary S. Terhune" <grystnews@mvps.org> wrote in message news:%23AGUlGUSFHA.580@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
I intend to install VPC when I get my new office set up--but not on my production machine, <s>. (It's an Asus AT7, by the way.)

Actually, I may buy a new machine and turn this one into a server, though I'm not certain what flavor. Probably SBS. The VPC machine
will be one I cobble together from parts, though a new mobo and PWS will likely be required. In fact, I may eschew getting a new
system and put together *two* new ones from parts. I'd only need two new mobos, PWSs and RAM. Add some SATA drives later.

Money looks to be tight for a while.

--
Gary S. Terhune
MS MVP Shell/User
http://www.grystmill.com/articles/cleanboot.htm
http://www.grystmill.com/articles/security.htm

"Bill Blanton" <bblanton@REMOVEmagicnet.net> wrote in message news:o 6rJOiTSFHA.3664@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> You should check out VPC for testing things like that..It supports up to 4
> virtual HDs iirc. Partition and format 'em any way you want. I *think* MS
> used to offer a timed trial version.
>
> Unfortunately, I have more HDs than connectors.. I'll trade you ;) 
>
Anonymous
April 25, 2005 11:11:18 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

"glee" <glee29@spamindspring.com> wrote in message
news:eLmmvZNSFHA.2964@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> "Lil' Dave" <spamyourself@virus.net> wrote in message
> news:%23z8DfWMSFHA.2348@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> > snip <
> > To answer your question about drive letter assignment, you need to go to
> > device manager under disk drives. (Hard drive IDs are not drive letter
> > assignments) Select the hard drive that is connected to the USB. Then
> > select "removable". This will "ungray" the drive letter assignment
below
> > it. Then you can assign a drive letter not already assigned to other
> > devices. Reboot/restart the PC.
>
> I considered mentioning that method, Dave, but since I have only
personally used it
> on CD drives, cameras, and flash-drives/usb-sticks, I could not verify
with
> certainty that it was valid for external hard drives. Of course, once I
think about
> it, it would have to be valid for that option also. :-)
>
> > I have not done this as its obvious from
> > the label name, so I can tell the difference from the video camera and
the
> > Firewire drive.
>
> Labels are the best way to avoid confusion, expecially if you have more
than one of
> the same type device.
>
> > To avoid confusion with multiple hard drives with multiple partitions in
a
> > PC regarding partition types, put primaries only on the first physical
hard
> > drive, followed by one extended partition if you still have empty space
> > remaining. The remaining hard drives should have extended partitions
only.
> > The only exception would be a temporarily connected hard drive for
cloning,
> > which windows should never "see". This has worked great for years for
me.
>
> I generally follow that method myself, but I know a lot of folks who
create a
> primary on the second physical drive also. See for example Bill Blanton's
practice
> of putting the swap file on a primary partition on the second physical
drive (
> mentioned in his reply in this thread).

Actually, my swapfile is on a ultrascsi 4GB HD. Its partitioned with one
extended partition with one logical drive taking all the space. Whether its
primary or extended partition with one dos logical drive is not a factor for
the swapfile as long as the partition is the first or only one. Can't prove
it, but feel this offload of the swapfile to another physical hard drive has
saved me from alot of grief when unexpected OS lockups etc. force a hard
reboot with the PC controls. Using same location for XPs swapfile as well.
> --
> Glen Ventura, MS MVP Shell/User, A+
> http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
> http://www.microsoft.com/communities/conduct/default.ms...
>
>
> > "Terry" <Terry@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
> > news:66FACF54-7F0C-443B-B9CD-2435F513A2D1@microsoft.com...
> > > I have a new external hard drive.
> > > I have no problem connect, but it only takes driver ID as computer E
> > drive.
> > > However, I already have had another device that use driver E as its
ID.
> > >
> > > I would like to change this new hard drive ID from E to other say G or
H.
> > > The driver company say it is Windows do this change.
> > >
> > > Can anyone tell me how to change driver ID?
> > >
> > > Thanks
> >
> >
>
Anonymous
April 25, 2005 1:07:27 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

"Lil' Dave" <spamyourself@virus.net> wrote in message news:uAB$jAZSFHA.3296@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
>
> "glee" <glee29@spamindspring.com> wrote in message
> news:eLmmvZNSFHA.2964@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...

>>
>> I generally follow that method myself, but I know a lot of folks who
> create a
>> primary on the second physical drive also. See for example Bill Blanton's
> practice
>> of putting the swap file on a primary partition on the second physical
> drive (
>> mentioned in his reply in this thread).
>
> Actually, my swapfile is on a ultrascsi 4GB HD. Its partitioned with one
> extended partition with one logical drive taking all the space. Whether its
> primary or extended partition with one dos logical drive is not a factor for
> the swapfile as long as the partition is the first or only one.

No, it's not a factor to the OS. The only reason of putting it in a first
primary, is only so the drive letter never changes if other logicals are
added/subtracted. Yeah, it's easy enough to reassign if need be, but
with multiple OSs (and their pontential restores from backups), it's
easier just to configure the "Swap" volume letter to just stay put,
by having it in a first primary on the second drive. Personal preference.
YMMV.

> Can't prove
> it, but feel this offload of the swapfile to another physical hard drive has
> saved me from alot of grief when unexpected OS lockups etc. force a hard
> reboot with the PC controls. Using same location for XPs swapfile as well.

I keep TIF and cookies there also, for fragmentation reasons. It's a busy
little drive..
April 25, 2005 9:49:05 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

> Just to be sure, before you used the Letter Assigner utility, you could see
both
> the new E:\ partition *and* what was E:\ but got assigned another letter by
> Windows?

Terry:
I did not fully understand this can you tell me more?
I did not partition any of my DH C:\ E:\ or H:\

> Did you assign all the drives letters using Letter Assigner?

Terry: No, only the new DH I assign letter

> I think you'd be better off if you simply repartition the new drive as one big
> Extended Partition. Depending on how large it is, I'd subdivide that into
> several smaller Volumes (Logical Drives.)
>
> How big is the new drive, and what Make/Model?

Terry: It is WesternDigit 120G dual combo eith 2 additional USB port.
When I connect my other USB divice through that additional port, it workds

Now my old and new DH (I think they hate each other) can not connect to my
computer and show up E and H together on my computer, even though I have
assigned new latter to new HD.
IS partition going to help, if so please tell me how?
Anonymous
April 26, 2005 3:27:02 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

"Terry" <Terry@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:1D781818-4B22-4155-A752-96E91773B86F@microsoft.com...
> > Just to be sure, before you used the Letter Assigner utility, you
could see
> both
> > the new E:\ partition *and* what was E:\ but got assigned another
letter by
> > Windows?
>
> Terry:
> I did not fully understand this can you tell me more?
> I did not partition any of my DH C:\ E:\ or H:\

Even if you did not partition those drives, they *must* be partitioned.
A partition is a logical structure on a hard drive. The partition is
what gets formatted. The simplest partitioning scheme is that each
physical drive is partitioned with a single Primary Partition. Please
don't be confused by the erroneous terminology used by Microsoft and
others. What they call "drives", as in "C:\ drive, D:\drive", etc., are
really partitions.

Using standard partitioning, there can be as many as 4 Primary
Partitions on a physical drive. One of those partitions *may* be an
Extended Partition. An Extended Partition may be sub-divided into
numerous Volumes, each of which is seen by Windows as a "drive", just
like a Primary Partition. The only partitions that must be Primary
Partition are partitions that have an operating system installed.

Before we get any farther into this situation, I'd like to be more clear
about what you actually have now. You'll probably need to use FDISK to
do some of this. Please tell me:
How many internal hard drives do you have--the physical drives, not
partitions.

How many partitions do you have on your internal hard drives? Are they
Primary Partitions or are they Extended Volumes.

If you can't understand this, or don't know how to use FDISK, please
report back and I will attempt to give you specific steps to follow. I
will also look into the manual for your new USB drive to see how to
manage partitioning it, since there are special issues to deal with
because it's a USB drive.

--
Gary S. Terhune
MS MVP Shell/User
http://www.grystmill.com/articles/cleanboot.htm
http://www.grystmill.com/articles/security.htm
April 26, 2005 7:03:53 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

"I did not partition any of my DH C:\ E:\ or H:\ "

You did but you didn't realize that you did? You partitioned them as
single logical drives and so they appear to not be partitioned to you,
but in reality any drive that works is partitioned in the strict sense
of the word. Best get up to speed on the lingo and be very precise in
using it from now on, please.

I only have a word of warning using Letter Assigner to move your
removable drive to another letter if it actually can do that. When you
remove the drive, Letter Assigner will fail to load it's drive layout
giving you the default setup. If you then reattach the drive, Letter
Assigner may still not work as it did before, requiring you to manually
reassign it using Letter Assigner each time you plug the drive back in.
Letter Assigner records both the Label of the drive and the Volume
Serial number for all drives and if ANY drive fails to show up for the
party as recorded previously, the saved drive layout simply is not
loaded giving you the default layout.

IIRC this failure is then recorded by Letter Assigner and you can't go
home again without running Letter Assigner again. Which might make it
more hassle than help?

Don't forget about this issue.
http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=263044

Basic info
http://www.pcnineoneone.com/howto/clean1.html
http://www.windowsreinstall.com/indexwin98.htm
http://www.pcguide.com/topicnf.html
!