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Why do refilled HP carts just "die" for no apparent reason?

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  • Printers
  • Hewlett Packard
  • Peripherals
Last response: in Computer Peripherals
Anonymous
a b α HP
February 9, 2005 6:18:10 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

I own a HP Potosmart P1000. When taking out, refilling, and repalcing carts
I handle them with utmost care.

Nevertheless it happens that a the printer flashes "Snap in cartridge" or
"cartridge failed" upon replacing. This happens both with the C6578 cart and
the 51645 cart. Sometimes just opening the lip and not even taking out the
cart is enuff to make them fail. Yes, I have cleaned the contacts and have
removed the power cord for a minute or more.

Can one fill with too much ink? or too little? Is the there some kind of
chip inside the cart that can remember my evil doings?

Really mysterious as I am sure I am not physically damaging the cart.

With thanks

Søren

More about : refilled carts die apparent reason

Anonymous
a b α HP
February 9, 2005 11:44:47 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

On Wed, 9 Feb 2005 03:18:10 +0100, "Søren Larsen"
<bcc13340a@post.cybercity.dk> wrote:

>I own a HP Potosmart P1000. When taking out, refilling, and repalcing carts
>I handle them with utmost care.
>
>Nevertheless it happens that a the printer flashes "Snap in cartridge" or
>"cartridge failed" upon replacing. This happens both with the C6578 cart and
>the 51645 cart. Sometimes just opening the lip and not even taking out the
>cart is enuff to make them fail. Yes, I have cleaned the contacts and have
>removed the power cord for a minute or more.
>
>Can one fill with too much ink? or too little? Is the there some kind of
>chip inside the cart that can remember my evil doings?
>
>Really mysterious as I am sure I am not physically damaging the cart.
>
>With thanks
>
>Søren
>

It's called Murph's Law.

Buy new HP cartridges and try again when they get empty and your luck
will change.

DK
Anonymous
a b α HP
February 9, 2005 3:52:10 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Well, a few possibilities, but someone who knows the specific cartridge
may know more.

All laser drums are light sensitive, so do not expose them to bright
light if at all possible. Most aren't horribly sensitive, but if
possible, low level indirect light is safest if the drum will be exposed.

Many printer companies have death chips or fuses built into their toner
cartridges and other consumables to kill them after they empty or after
a certain number of copies are reached.

This should be illegal in my opinion. I'm not sure what HP might be
doing in this case, but many printers will blow or damage a chip or
fuse/link at a certain number of copies or if the toner cartridge goes
empty. Nasty.

You may be using an incorrect type of toner. There are hundreds. They
can be VERY different in make up. Size of particles, types of plastics,
thermal characteristics, magnetic properties, ionic charge, dyes or
colorants used, etc. In general HP/Canon use a mixed developer toner
which is magnetic, and very fine..

Art

Søren Larsen wrote:

> I own a HP Potosmart P1000. When taking out, refilling, and repalcing carts
> I handle them with utmost care.
>
> Nevertheless it happens that a the printer flashes "Snap in cartridge" or
> "cartridge failed" upon replacing. This happens both with the C6578 cart and
> the 51645 cart. Sometimes just opening the lip and not even taking out the
> cart is enuff to make them fail. Yes, I have cleaned the contacts and have
> removed the power cord for a minute or more.
>
> Can one fill with too much ink? or too little? Is the there some kind of
> chip inside the cart that can remember my evil doings?
>
> Really mysterious as I am sure I am not physically damaging the cart.
>
> With thanks
>
> Søren
>
>
Related resources
Anonymous
a b α HP
February 9, 2005 3:52:11 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Since the poster was talking about inkjet and not laser, most of this does
not apply.
Most often, the carts die because they were run empty. Always refill before
they run out and they will last a lot longer.



"Arthur Entlich" <artistic@telus.net> wrote in message
news:_HnOd.33002$L_3.7693@clgrps13...
> Well, a few possibilities, but someone who knows the specific cartridge
> may know more.
>
> All laser drums are light sensitive, so do not expose them to bright
> light if at all possible. Most aren't horribly sensitive, but if
> possible, low level indirect light is safest if the drum will be exposed.
>
> Many printer companies have death chips or fuses built into their toner
> cartridges and other consumables to kill them after they empty or after
> a certain number of copies are reached.
>
> This should be illegal in my opinion. I'm not sure what HP might be
> doing in this case, but many printers will blow or damage a chip or
> fuse/link at a certain number of copies or if the toner cartridge goes
> empty. Nasty.
>
> You may be using an incorrect type of toner. There are hundreds. They
> can be VERY different in make up. Size of particles, types of plastics,
> thermal characteristics, magnetic properties, ionic charge, dyes or
> colorants used, etc. In general HP/Canon use a mixed developer toner
> which is magnetic, and very fine..
>
> Art
>
> Søren Larsen wrote:
>
> > I own a HP Potosmart P1000. When taking out, refilling, and repalcing
carts
> > I handle them with utmost care.
> >
> > Nevertheless it happens that a the printer flashes "Snap in cartridge"
or
> > "cartridge failed" upon replacing. This happens both with the C6578 cart
and
> > the 51645 cart. Sometimes just opening the lip and not even taking out
the
> > cart is enuff to make them fail. Yes, I have cleaned the contacts and
have
> > removed the power cord for a minute or more.
> >
> > Can one fill with too much ink? or too little? Is the there some kind of
> > chip inside the cart that can remember my evil doings?
> >
> > Really mysterious as I am sure I am not physically damaging the cart.
> >
> > With thanks
> >
> > Søren
> >
> >
>
Anonymous
a b α HP
February 9, 2005 11:06:44 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

I'm fairly certain that neither the 45, nor the 78 have
any sophisticated electronics inside. So the most
likely scenario is that you ran the cartridge dry
and burned up one or more rersistors, and the
printer electronics can sense that.

Some (all?) printers with the 78 may be able to
count drops and store them in conjunction with
the cartridge ID. You can erase this info if you
have a few cartridges since it can remember only
a very small number of cartridges, probably
anywhere between 2 - 4.

If you want to refill, you need to do it before you
burn up the resistors (the ink cools them). I don't
recommend you to refill the 45 (unless you can do
it through the nozzles) since puncturing the spring
bag can easily lead to leaks. In addition, replacement
blacks may not dry as fast, and be as waterfast
as the HP ink.

"Søren Larsen" <bcc13340a@post.cybercity.dk> wrote in message
news:cubrt3$1q1r$1@news.cybercity.dk...
> I own a HP Potosmart P1000. When taking out, refilling, and repalcing
carts
> I handle them with utmost care.
>
> Nevertheless it happens that a the printer flashes "Snap in cartridge" or
> "cartridge failed" upon replacing. This happens both with the C6578 cart
and
> the 51645 cart. Sometimes just opening the lip and not even taking out the
> cart is enuff to make them fail. Yes, I have cleaned the contacts and have
> removed the power cord for a minute or more.
>
> Can one fill with too much ink? or too little? Is the there some kind of
> chip inside the cart that can remember my evil doings?
>
> Really mysterious as I am sure I am not physically damaging the cart.
>
> With thanks
>
> Søren
>
>
Anonymous
a b α HP
February 9, 2005 11:39:48 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

"Arthur Entlich" <artistic@telus.net> wrote in message
news:_HnOd.33002$L_3.7693@clgrps13...

> All laser drums are light sensitive, so do not expose them to bright light if
> at all possible.

The OP has an inkjet printer.

> Many printer companies have death chips or fuses built into their toner
> cartridges and other consumables to kill them after they empty or after a
> certain number of copies are reached.

No such thing on the printer in question.

> This should be illegal in my opinion. I'm not sure what HP might be doing in
> this case, but many printers will blow or damage a chip or fuse/link at a
> certain number of copies or if the toner cartridge goes empty. Nasty.

Not applicable at all to any HP Deskjet's, Photosmarts or PSC units.

- Bob Headrick, not speaking for my employer HP
February 10, 2005 12:53:39 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

In article <110lpcohcbisuf8@corp.supernews.com>, bobh@proaxis.com says...
>
> "Arthur Entlich" <artistic@telus.net> wrote in message
> news:_HnOd.33002$L_3.7693@clgrps13...
>
> > All laser drums are light sensitive, so do not expose them to bright light if
> > at all possible.
>
> The OP has an inkjet printer.
>
> > Many printer companies have death chips or fuses built into their toner
> > cartridges and other consumables to kill them after they empty or after a
> > certain number of copies are reached.
>
> No such thing on the printer in question.
>
> > This should be illegal in my opinion. I'm not sure what HP might be doing in
> > this case, but many printers will blow or damage a chip or fuse/link at a
> > certain number of copies or if the toner cartridge goes empty. Nasty.
>
> Not applicable at all to any HP Deskjet's, Photosmarts or PSC units.
>
> - Bob Headrick, not speaking for my employer HP
>
>
>


HP cartridges DO WEAR OUT! And they will do it with surprising rapidity if
they are run out of ink for even a VERY short time.

They also are prone to what I call "air binding" when refilled (remember
despite your best intentions they were NOT designed to be used that way)

For the few times I have re-filled HP cartridges I have always re-filled when
I though they were about 1/2 full (# 56, 57, 58, and others of that size)

Or 1/4 full (#78 et al)

I never refilled a cartridge for an HP more than 3 times, as I figured the
cartridge will wear out somtime or other and I just dont want iot to do so
while Im on deadline!

For the printers using # 56, 57 58 you need to have several of each number to
use in rotation, so the printer wont remember the serial number of the
cartridge upon re-filling. By the time you get to cart #4 the printer will
forget cart #1, and see it as a NEW cartridge.


--
Larry Lynch
Mystic, Ct.
Anonymous
a b α HP
February 10, 2005 1:29:50 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

You're absolutely correct Dan, I completely misread the posting! Serves
me right for answering in the wee hours of the morning while sleep deprived.

In terms of inkjet cartridges, there are usually numerous web sites that
offer step by step solutions to refilling various manufacturer's
cartridges, and offer suggestions on getting around the pitfalls.


Art

Dan G wrote:

> Since the poster was talking about inkjet and not laser, most of this does
> not apply.
> Most often, the carts die because they were run empty. Always refill before
> they run out and they will last a lot longer.
>
>
>
> "Arthur Entlich" <artistic@telus.net> wrote in message
> news:_HnOd.33002$L_3.7693@clgrps13...
>
>>Well, a few possibilities, but someone who knows the specific cartridge
>>may know more.
>>
>>All laser drums are light sensitive, so do not expose them to bright
>>light if at all possible. Most aren't horribly sensitive, but if
>>possible, low level indirect light is safest if the drum will be exposed.
>>
>>Many printer companies have death chips or fuses built into their toner
>>cartridges and other consumables to kill them after they empty or after
>>a certain number of copies are reached.
>>
>>This should be illegal in my opinion. I'm not sure what HP might be
>>doing in this case, but many printers will blow or damage a chip or
>>fuse/link at a certain number of copies or if the toner cartridge goes
>>empty. Nasty.
>>
>>You may be using an incorrect type of toner. There are hundreds. They
>>can be VERY different in make up. Size of particles, types of plastics,
>>thermal characteristics, magnetic properties, ionic charge, dyes or
>>colorants used, etc. In general HP/Canon use a mixed developer toner
>>which is magnetic, and very fine..
>>
>>Art
>>
>>Søren Larsen wrote:
>>
>>
>>>I own a HP Potosmart P1000. When taking out, refilling, and repalcing
>
> carts
>
>>>I handle them with utmost care.
>>>
>>>Nevertheless it happens that a the printer flashes "Snap in cartridge"
>
> or
>
>>>"cartridge failed" upon replacing. This happens both with the C6578 cart
>
> and
>
>>>the 51645 cart. Sometimes just opening the lip and not even taking out
>
> the
>
>>>cart is enuff to make them fail. Yes, I have cleaned the contacts and
>
> have
>
>>>removed the power cord for a minute or more.
>>>
>>>Can one fill with too much ink? or too little? Is the there some kind of
>>>chip inside the cart that can remember my evil doings?
>>>
>>>Really mysterious as I am sure I am not physically damaging the cart.
>>>
>>>With thanks
>>>
>>>Søren
>>>
>>>
>>
>
>
Anonymous
a b α HP
February 10, 2005 1:32:28 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Hi Bob,

You're correct, I misread the poster's message and thought he was
speaking of a laser printer cartridge. Looking over the OP message, I
see my error now. Too many numbers to recall, too little sleep...

Art

Bob Headrick wrote:

> "Arthur Entlich" <artistic@telus.net> wrote in message
> news:_HnOd.33002$L_3.7693@clgrps13...
>
>
>>All laser drums are light sensitive, so do not expose them to bright light if
>>at all possible.
>
>
> The OP has an inkjet printer.
>
>
>>Many printer companies have death chips or fuses built into their toner
>>cartridges and other consumables to kill them after they empty or after a
>>certain number of copies are reached.
>
>
> No such thing on the printer in question.
>
>
>>This should be illegal in my opinion. I'm not sure what HP might be doing in
>>this case, but many printers will blow or damage a chip or fuse/link at a
>>certain number of copies or if the toner cartridge goes empty. Nasty.
>
>
> Not applicable at all to any HP Deskjet's, Photosmarts or PSC units.
>
> - Bob Headrick, not speaking for my employer HP
>
>
Anonymous
a b α HP
February 12, 2005 1:21:29 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Larry wrote:
> In article <110lpcohcbisuf8@corp.supernews.com>, bobh@proaxis.com says...
>

> HP cartridges DO WEAR OUT! And they will do it with surprising rapidity if
> they are run out of ink for even a VERY short time.
>
> They also are prone to what I call "air binding" when refilled (remember
> despite your best intentions they were NOT designed to be used that way)
>
> For the few times I have re-filled HP cartridges I have always re-filled when
> I though they were about 1/2 full (# 56, 57, 58, and others of that size)
>
> Or 1/4 full (#78 et al)
>
> I never refilled a cartridge for an HP more than 3 times, as I figured the
> cartridge will wear out somtime or other and I just dont want iot to do so
> while Im on deadline!
>
> For the printers using # 56, 57 58 you need to have several of each number to
> use in rotation, so the printer wont remember the serial number of the
> cartridge upon re-filling. By the time you get to cart #4 the printer will
> forget cart #1, and see it as a NEW cartridge.
>
>

I'm gonna have to replace the #57 cart in my PSC2110. Since the last
refill the red ink wants to clog. I can get it cleared out, but by the
next day it's clogged again. <SIGH.> I guess 17 refills will just have
to do.

TJ
February 12, 2005 1:24:30 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

In article <110qtas8uc64nea@corp.supernews.com>, tjatari@dreamscape.com
says...
> Larry wrote:
> > In article <110lpcohcbisuf8@corp.supernews.com>, bobh@proaxis.com says...
> >
>
> > HP cartridges DO WEAR OUT! And they will do it with surprising rapidity if
> > they are run out of ink for even a VERY short time.
> >
> > They also are prone to what I call "air binding" when refilled (remember
> > despite your best intentions they were NOT designed to be used that way)
> >
> > For the few times I have re-filled HP cartridges I have always re-filled when
> > I though they were about 1/2 full (# 56, 57, 58, and others of that size)
> >
> > Or 1/4 full (#78 et al)
> >
> > I never refilled a cartridge for an HP more than 3 times, as I figured the
> > cartridge will wear out somtime or other and I just dont want iot to do so
> > while Im on deadline!
> >
> > For the printers using # 56, 57 58 you need to have several of each number to
> > use in rotation, so the printer wont remember the serial number of the
> > cartridge upon re-filling. By the time you get to cart #4 the printer will
> > forget cart #1, and see it as a NEW cartridge.
> >
> >
>
> I'm gonna have to replace the #57 cart in my PSC2110. Since the last
> refill the red ink wants to clog. I can get it cleared out, but by the
> next day it's clogged again. <SIGH.> I guess 17 refills will just have
> to do.
>
> TJ
>

17????

Not too bad at all.


--
Larry Lynch
Mystic, Ct.
Anonymous
a b α HP
January 10, 2010 5:33:14 PM

:fou: 
Quote:
Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Since the poster was talking about inkjet and not laser, most of this does
not apply.
Most often, the carts die because they were run empty. Always refill before
they run out and they will last a lot longer.



"Arthur Entlich" <artistic@telus.net> wrote in message
news:_HnOd.33002$L_3.7693@clgrps13...
> Well, a few possibilities, but someone who knows the specific cartridge
> may know more.
>
> All laser drums are light sensitive, so do not expose them to bright
> light if at all possible. Most aren't horribly sensitive, but if
> possible, low level indirect light is safest if the drum will be exposed.
>
> Many printer companies have death chips or fuses built into their toner
> cartridges and other consumables to kill them after they empty or after
> a certain number of copies are reached.
>
> This should be illegal in my opinion. I'm not sure what HP might be
> doing in this case, but many printers will blow or damage a chip or
> fuse/link at a certain number of copies or if the toner cartridge goes
> empty. Nasty.
>
> You may be using an incorrect type of toner. There are hundreds. They
> can be VERY different in make up. Size of particles, types of plastics,
> thermal characteristics, magnetic properties, ionic charge, dyes or
> colorants used, etc. In general HP/Canon use a mixed developer toner
> which is magnetic, and very fine..
>
> Art
>
> Søren Larsen wrote:
>
> > I own a HP Potosmart P1000. When taking out, refilling, and repalcing
carts
> > I handle them with utmost care.
> >
> > Nevertheless it happens that a the printer flashes "Snap in cartridge"
or
> > "cartridge failed" upon replacing. This happens both with the C6578 cart
and
> > the 51645 cart. Sometimes just opening the lip and not even taking out
the
> > cart is enuff to make them fail. Yes, I have cleaned the contacts and
have
> > removed the power cord for a minute or more.
> >
> > Can one fill with too much ink? or too little? Is the there some kind of
> > chip inside the cart that can remember my evil doings?
> >
> > Really mysterious as I am sure I am not physically damaging the cart.
> >
> > With thanks
> >
> > Tom in WA ... hi... I have found out that on all ink jet (office jet also) the cart is also the print head, thus more money, and if the print head gets told by the printer its bad, then you're screwed and have to buy another cart :cry: 
> >
> >
>