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Removing old Email Addresses from Registry

Last response: in Windows 95/98/ME
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Anonymous
May 5, 2005 5:07:20 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

Hello:

I was looking at my Registry and I noticed some of the Values where old
Email Addresses. One's from IPs I no longer use. Is it safe to Delete the
Folders they are in ??
Anonymous
May 5, 2005 5:07:21 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

Those are not "folders", they're "Keys", and whether or not it's safe to
remove the old Keys depends on what they are. Highlight the Keys you're
looking at, then click File>Export, save the export(s) to your Desktop
as REG files. Then right click each one and choose EDIT. That will open
them in your default plain text editor, whence you can copy the info and
then paste into a Reply here. The Exports should contain sufficient
information to permit cogent advice.

I can at least suggest that you're on the right track if your goal is to
get rid of the "shortcut" on your Desktop that you mentioned in a
previous post. It is most likely a Registry Key or Value that needs
deleting or modifying.

--
Gary S. Terhune
MS MVP Shell/User
http://www.grystmill.com/articles/cleanboot.htm
http://www.grystmill.com/articles/security.htm

"Drew Leyda" <Mint_aid@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:%23SwXOBTUFHA.3840@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> Hello:
>
> I was looking at my Registry and I noticed some of the Values where
old
> Email Addresses. One's from IPs I no longer use. Is it safe to Delete
the
> Folders they are in ??
>
>
>
Anonymous
May 5, 2005 4:30:32 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

The Shortcut involves one of the old Dial-ups. There are a couple other
Dial-ups that show in the registry and no where else. I will post the
contents of the Keys here.
drew

"Gary S. Terhune" <grystnews@mvps.org> wrote in message
news:%23LrCmITUFHA.2540@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> Those are not "folders", they're "Keys", and whether or not it's safe to
> remove the old Keys depends on what they are. Highlight the Keys you're
> looking at, then click File>Export, save the export(s) to your Desktop
> as REG files. Then right click each one and choose EDIT. That will open
> them in your default plain text editor, whence you can copy the info and
> then paste into a Reply here. The Exports should contain sufficient
> information to permit cogent advice.
>
> I can at least suggest that you're on the right track if your goal is to
> get rid of the "shortcut" on your Desktop that you mentioned in a
> previous post. It is most likely a Registry Key or Value that needs
> deleting or modifying.
>
> --
> Gary S. Terhune
> MS MVP Shell/User
> http://www.grystmill.com/articles/cleanboot.htm
> http://www.grystmill.com/articles/security.htm
>
> "Drew Leyda" <Mint_aid@yahoo.com> wrote in message
> news:%23SwXOBTUFHA.3840@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
>> Hello:
>>
>> I was looking at my Registry and I noticed some of the Values where
> old
>> Email Addresses. One's from IPs I no longer use. Is it safe to Delete
> the
>> Folders they are in ??
>>
>>
>>
>
Related resources
Anonymous
May 5, 2005 4:43:06 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\ASF\ROC\10]
"HelpFile"="C:\\Program Files\\ASF\\ROC\\"
@=""
"Name"="XXXXX XXXXXX"
"PID"="1000&TC=4VB1"
"Email"="XXXXXX@valunet.com"
"Code"="RXD3488T88A-6M7J8F"

I have changed personel information to Xs.

"Gary S. Terhune" <grystnews@mvps.org> wrote in message
news:%23LrCmITUFHA.2540@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> Those are not "folders", they're "Keys", and whether or not it's safe to
> remove the old Keys depends on what they are. Highlight the Keys you're
> looking at, then click File>Export, save the export(s) to your Desktop
> as REG files. Then right click each one and choose EDIT. That will open
> them in your default plain text editor, whence you can copy the info and
> then paste into a Reply here. The Exports should contain sufficient
> information to permit cogent advice.
>
> I can at least suggest that you're on the right track if your goal is to
> get rid of the "shortcut" on your Desktop that you mentioned in a
> previous post. It is most likely a Registry Key or Value that needs
> deleting or modifying.
>
> --
> Gary S. Terhune
> MS MVP Shell/User
> http://www.grystmill.com/articles/cleanboot.htm
> http://www.grystmill.com/articles/security.htm
>
> "Drew Leyda" <Mint_aid@yahoo.com> wrote in message
> news:%23SwXOBTUFHA.3840@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
>> Hello:
>>
>> I was looking at my Registry and I noticed some of the Values where
> old
>> Email Addresses. One's from IPs I no longer use. Is it safe to Delete
> the
>> Folders they are in ??
>>
>>
>>
>
Anonymous
May 5, 2005 4:43:07 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

And does this Key somehow correspond to the Dial-up connectoid on your
Desktop? Because I find no mention in any searches of those program
names belonging to an ISP. What I find are mentions of a Photoshop
Plug-in. www.asf.com If you have that software installed, this would
seem to me to be a Key that happens to include your licensing
information, which happens to include your email--nothing to do with a
dial-up connection.

You don't want to be searching for your old email address in the
Registry, necessarily--there's bound to be a few mentions of it. In the
case of ASF ROC, the proper thing to do would be to go to the ASF site
and update your licensing information. Unless it's not important to you
because, for instance, it was just a freebie trial ad you no longer use
it. What you do about other mentions of obsolete emails should be
decided on a case-by-case basis.

OK. First, it is doubtful that what you have on your Desktop is simply a
shortcut to a Windows Dial-up connection. If it's something you used to
click to go online, then it's either a proprietary dialer program, or
it's a "shortcut" to a program that eventually uses a Windows Dial-up
connection. But, because it won't let itself be deleted, that hints that
it isn't a standard shortcut at all, but rather a "Namespace" item--an
icon fabricated by a Registry entry. What you want to do to find such
items is to search the Registry for the name of that icon, verbatim. If
you come up with a key or two that includes that specific name, then
post that Key here for inspection.

Come to think of it, you haven't described that item on the Desktop very
fully. If you were to do so, it would be a lot easier to advise you on
the subject. What's its name? What company do you think it comes from?
Right-click on it, then click Properties. What does it say in there?

--
Gary S. Terhune
MS MVP Shell/User
http://www.grystmill.com/articles/cleanboot.htm
http://www.grystmill.com/articles/security.htm

"Drew Leyda" <Mint_aid@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:eR4tDGZUFHA.2096@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00
>
> [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\ASF\ROC\10]
> "HelpFile"="C:\\Program Files\\ASF\\ROC\\"
> @=""
> "Name"="XXXXX XXXXXX"
> "PID"="1000&TC=4VB1"
> "Email"="XXXXXX@valunet.com"
> "Code"="RXD3488T88A-6M7J8F"
>
> I have changed personel information to Xs.
Anonymous
May 6, 2005 4:07:24 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

I always get a lot of ideas from your posts. I appreciate your detail.
The computer in question is not mine but one I am working on. It is not here
so I can not post the Keys. I am going there today so I will bring them
back.
I posted one from mine as an example. I use ROC and I will tell them my
Email address needs changed.
On the computer in question some of the Keys' relate to Programs not longer
used. I get the impression from your post that it is OK to remove them.
The Shortcut is ( or was) to a local Dial-up ISP called Valunet. It was
installed from a disk that the ISP sent us so I would say it is a
proprietary program.
When I try to Delete it I get the gray "Connection Manager Profile Service"
screen.
If I try to Rename or Properties I get " ..Service Profile. Close is the
only other option on the drop down menu.

drew

"Gary S. Terhune" <grystnews@mvps.org> wrote in message
news:eWo1dTaUFHA.628@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> And does this Key somehow correspond to the Dial-up connectoid on your
> Desktop? Because I find no mention in any searches of those program
> names belonging to an ISP. What I find are mentions of a Photoshop
> Plug-in. www.asf.com If you have that software installed, this would
> seem to me to be a Key that happens to include your licensing
> information, which happens to include your email--nothing to do with a
> dial-up connection.
>
> You don't want to be searching for your old email address in the
> Registry, necessarily--there's bound to be a few mentions of it. In the
> case of ASF ROC, the proper thing to do would be to go to the ASF site
> and update your licensing information. Unless it's not important to you
> because, for instance, it was just a freebie trial ad you no longer use
> it. What you do about other mentions of obsolete emails should be
> decided on a case-by-case basis.
>
> OK. First, it is doubtful that what you have on your Desktop is simply a
> shortcut to a Windows Dial-up connection. If it's something you used to
> click to go online, then it's either a proprietary dialer program, or
> it's a "shortcut" to a program that eventually uses a Windows Dial-up
> connection. But, because it won't let itself be deleted, that hints that
> it isn't a standard shortcut at all, but rather a "Namespace" item--an
> icon fabricated by a Registry entry. What you want to do to find such
> items is to search the Registry for the name of that icon, verbatim. If
> you come up with a key or two that includes that specific name, then
> post that Key here for inspection.
>
> Come to think of it, you haven't described that item on the Desktop very
> fully. If you were to do so, it would be a lot easier to advise you on
> the subject. What's its name? What company do you think it comes from?
> Right-click on it, then click Properties. What does it say in there?
>
> --
> Gary S. Terhune
> MS MVP Shell/User
> http://www.grystmill.com/articles/cleanboot.htm
> http://www.grystmill.com/articles/security.htm
>
> "Drew Leyda" <Mint_aid@yahoo.com> wrote in message
> news:eR4tDGZUFHA.2096@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
>> Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00
>>
>> [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\ASF\ROC\10]
>> "HelpFile"="C:\\Program Files\\ASF\\ROC\\"
>> @=""
>> "Name"="XXXXX XXXXXX"
>> "PID"="1000&TC=4VB1"
>> "Email"="XXXXXX@valunet.com"
>> "Code"="RXD3488T88A-6M7J8F"
>>
>> I have changed personel information to Xs.
>
Anonymous
May 7, 2005 3:16:52 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

The basic problem was that when the OS was first installed someone used the
first Email address as the Logon (User) name.
(XXXX@valunet.com)
When the ISP associated with that Email address when out of business another
IPS was used. All told there where 4 ISP names floating around in the
Registry.
When I searched the Registry for the Valunet name I found that it was
sometimes used as an Email address and sometimes used as a User name .
I carefully changed the Valunet values to the appropriate Email address or
User Name. I also Delete some Keys altogether.
It was not to difficult. Norton was the only one that gave me a problem but
I fixed it.
I learned quite a bit from this and feel more confident about modifying the
Registry.
The " Icon" is a different story and is explained in another post.
Thank you for your guidance.
drew

"Gary S. Terhune" <grystnews@mvps.org> wrote in message
news:eWo1dTaUFHA.628@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> And does this Key somehow correspond to the Dial-up connectoid on your
> Desktop? Because I find no mention in any searches of those program
> names belonging to an ISP. What I find are mentions of a Photoshop
> Plug-in. www.asf.com If you have that software installed, this would
> seem to me to be a Key that happens to include your licensing
> information, which happens to include your email--nothing to do with a
> dial-up connection.
>
> You don't want to be searching for your old email address in the
> Registry, necessarily--there's bound to be a few mentions of it. In the
> case of ASF ROC, the proper thing to do would be to go to the ASF site
> and update your licensing information. Unless it's not important to you
> because, for instance, it was just a freebie trial ad you no longer use
> it. What you do about other mentions of obsolete emails should be
> decided on a case-by-case basis.
>
> OK. First, it is doubtful that what you have on your Desktop is simply a
> shortcut to a Windows Dial-up connection. If it's something you used to
> click to go online, then it's either a proprietary dialer program, or
> it's a "shortcut" to a program that eventually uses a Windows Dial-up
> connection. But, because it won't let itself be deleted, that hints that
> it isn't a standard shortcut at all, but rather a "Namespace" item--an
> icon fabricated by a Registry entry. What you want to do to find such
> items is to search the Registry for the name of that icon, verbatim. If
> you come up with a key or two that includes that specific name, then
> post that Key here for inspection.
>
> Come to think of it, you haven't described that item on the Desktop very
> fully. If you were to do so, it would be a lot easier to advise you on
> the subject. What's its name? What company do you think it comes from?
> Right-click on it, then click Properties. What does it say in there?
>
> --
> Gary S. Terhune
> MS MVP Shell/User
> http://www.grystmill.com/articles/cleanboot.htm
> http://www.grystmill.com/articles/security.htm
>
> "Drew Leyda" <Mint_aid@yahoo.com> wrote in message
> news:eR4tDGZUFHA.2096@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
>> Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00
>>
>> [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\ASF\ROC\10]
>> "HelpFile"="C:\\Program Files\\ASF\\ROC\\"
>> @=""
>> "Name"="XXXXX XXXXXX"
>> "PID"="1000&TC=4VB1"
>> "Email"="XXXXXX@valunet.com"
>> "Code"="RXD3488T88A-6M7J8F"
>>
>> I have changed personel information to Xs.
>
!