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installing used RAM module in old machine

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  • RAM
  • Computers
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June 15, 2005 1:06:58 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

I've removed two old 32 MB Ram modules from my Windows 98 Dell computer
and replaced them with a new 128 MB module. With the increased RAM the
computer works fine. (Fantastic, in fact.)

A friend has a Windows 98 computer with two 32 MB modules (or maybe one
64 MB module). Can I simply add one (or two, if there's room) of my old
32 MB modules into that other machine to increase its memory?

Thanks,
Larry

More about : installing ram module machine

Anonymous
June 15, 2005 1:06:59 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

Only if they're of the same type required for the machine/mobo. Check his
documentation or the manufacturers site for specs. If they are the same,
sometimes they can be added to any open slot/s, yet that does not always work
when adding smaller modules w/larger module installed. In that case you may need
to pull the larger stick, put the smaller sticks in the first slots and the
larger after.

--

Brian A. Sesko
{ MS MVP_Shell/User }
Conflicts start where information lacks.
http://www.dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
http://basconotw.mvps.org/



"Larry" <larry328NOSPAM@att.net> wrote in message
news:o e89KYUcFHA.3840@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> I've removed two old 32 MB Ram modules from my Windows 98 Dell computer
> and replaced them with a new 128 MB module. With the increased RAM the
> computer works fine. (Fantastic, in fact.)
>
> A friend has a Windows 98 computer with two 32 MB modules (or maybe one
> 64 MB module). Can I simply add one (or two, if there's room) of my old
> 32 MB modules into that other machine to increase its memory?
>
> Thanks,
> Larry
>
>
Anonymous
June 15, 2005 2:41:18 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

If the speed settings, and if the motherboard has vacant memory slot, and if the motherboard can address >64MB
none of which are guaranteed
then yes

--
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links provided as a courtesy, read all instructions on the pages before use

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_
"Larry" <larry328NOSPAM@att.net> wrote in message news:o e89KYUcFHA.3840@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
| I've removed two old 32 MB Ram modules from my Windows 98 Dell computer
| and replaced them with a new 128 MB module. With the increased RAM the
| computer works fine. (Fantastic, in fact.)
|
| A friend has a Windows 98 computer with two 32 MB modules (or maybe one
| 64 MB module). Can I simply add one (or two, if there's room) of my old
| 32 MB modules into that other machine to increase its memory?
|
| Thanks,
| Larry
|
|
Related resources
Anonymous
June 15, 2005 9:48:55 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

Safest answer is maybe. Based on what you apparently don't know about your
friend's PC under the hood contents, RAM module socket type, RAM timing
requirements of the current under hood RAM, RAM capacity of the chipset,
banking configuration, and what your current RAM module timing configuration
requirements are..

"Larry" <larry328NOSPAM@att.net> wrote in message
news:o e89KYUcFHA.3840@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> I've removed two old 32 MB Ram modules from my Windows 98 Dell computer
> and replaced them with a new 128 MB module. With the increased RAM the
> computer works fine. (Fantastic, in fact.)
>
> A friend has a Windows 98 computer with two 32 MB modules (or maybe one
> 64 MB module). Can I simply add one (or two, if there's room) of my old
> 32 MB modules into that other machine to increase its memory?
>
> Thanks,
> Larry
>
>
June 15, 2005 5:33:37 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

The specs are identical except that her computer has two DIMM sockets
with a maximum RAM of 512, and mine has three DIMM sockets with maximum
RAM of 384. So the only question is, is her current RAM a single 64 MB
module, leaving one socket free in which I could insert one of my extra
32 MB modules. Or does she have two 32 MB modules, in which case case
all the available sockets are being used.

I assume that if she has a 64 MB module in one socket, there is no
problem in my sticking a 32 MB module in the other socket.






"Lil' Dave" <spamyourself@virus.net> wrote in message
news:%23tA1afZcFHA.2664@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> Safest answer is maybe. Based on what you apparently don't know about
your
> friend's PC under the hood contents, RAM module socket type, RAM
timing
> requirements of the current under hood RAM, RAM capacity of the
chipset,
> banking configuration, and what your current RAM module timing
configuration
> requirements are..
>
> "Larry" <larry328NOSPAM@att.net> wrote in message
> news:o e89KYUcFHA.3840@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> > I've removed two old 32 MB Ram modules from my Windows 98 Dell
computer
> > and replaced them with a new 128 MB module. With the increased RAM
the
> > computer works fine. (Fantastic, in fact.)
> >
> > A friend has a Windows 98 computer with two 32 MB modules (or maybe
one
> > 64 MB module). Can I simply add one (or two, if there's room) of my
old
> > 32 MB modules into that other machine to increase its memory?
> >
> > Thanks,
> > Larry
> >
> >
>
>
Anonymous
June 16, 2005 10:11:21 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

Pop the hood and look should answer the last unknown. You'll have to do
that anyway if there is a DIMM socket available. Plug the DIMM in the
socket.
Boot in stages.
Verify the bios sees the added physical memory first.
Boot to dos mode, and be alert for errors.
Do similar in windows safe mode next.
Then, if no I/O errors, boot into windows. Be alert for I/O errors for the
first hour or so.
"Larry" <larry328NOSPAM@att.net> wrote in message
news:u$X1f$ccFHA.3280@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> The specs are identical except that her computer has two DIMM sockets
> with a maximum RAM of 512, and mine has three DIMM sockets with maximum
> RAM of 384. So the only question is, is her current RAM a single 64 MB
> module, leaving one socket free in which I could insert one of my extra
> 32 MB modules. Or does she have two 32 MB modules, in which case case
> all the available sockets are being used.
>
> I assume that if she has a 64 MB module in one socket, there is no
> problem in my sticking a 32 MB module in the other socket.
>
>
>
>
>
>
> "Lil' Dave" <spamyourself@virus.net> wrote in message
> news:%23tA1afZcFHA.2664@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> > Safest answer is maybe. Based on what you apparently don't know about
> your
> > friend's PC under the hood contents, RAM module socket type, RAM
> timing
> > requirements of the current under hood RAM, RAM capacity of the
> chipset,
> > banking configuration, and what your current RAM module timing
> configuration
> > requirements are..
> >
> > "Larry" <larry328NOSPAM@att.net> wrote in message
> > news:o e89KYUcFHA.3840@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> > > I've removed two old 32 MB Ram modules from my Windows 98 Dell
> computer
> > > and replaced them with a new 128 MB module. With the increased RAM
> the
> > > computer works fine. (Fantastic, in fact.)
> > >
> > > A friend has a Windows 98 computer with two 32 MB modules (or maybe
> one
> > > 64 MB module). Can I simply add one (or two, if there's room) of my
> old
> > > 32 MB modules into that other machine to increase its memory?
> > >
> > > Thanks,
> > > Larry
> > >
> > >
> >
> >
>
>
June 17, 2005 12:36:48 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

My friend's computer did have the available slot, so I stuck in the
module, started it up, and everything seems to be ok so far. Thanks,
everyone.

Larry


"Lil' Dave" <spamyourself@virus.net> wrote in message
news:o 2Y9nQmcFHA.220@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> Pop the hood and look should answer the last unknown. You'll have to
do
> that anyway if there is a DIMM socket available. Plug the DIMM in the
> socket.
> Boot in stages.
> Verify the bios sees the added physical memory first.
> Boot to dos mode, and be alert for errors.
> Do similar in windows safe mode next.
> Then, if no I/O errors, boot into windows. Be alert for I/O errors
for the
> first hour or so.
> "Larry" <larry328NOSPAM@att.net> wrote in message
> news:u$X1f$ccFHA.3280@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> > The specs are identical except that her computer has two DIMM
sockets
> > with a maximum RAM of 512, and mine has three DIMM sockets with
maximum
> > RAM of 384. So the only question is, is her current RAM a single 64
MB
> > module, leaving one socket free in which I could insert one of my
extra
> > 32 MB modules. Or does she have two 32 MB modules, in which case
case
> > all the available sockets are being used.
> >
> > I assume that if she has a 64 MB module in one socket, there is no
> > problem in my sticking a 32 MB module in the other socket.
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > "Lil' Dave" <spamyourself@virus.net> wrote in message
> > news:%23tA1afZcFHA.2664@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> > > Safest answer is maybe. Based on what you apparently don't know
about
> > your
> > > friend's PC under the hood contents, RAM module socket type, RAM
> > timing
> > > requirements of the current under hood RAM, RAM capacity of the
> > chipset,
> > > banking configuration, and what your current RAM module timing
> > configuration
> > > requirements are..
> > >
> > > "Larry" <larry328NOSPAM@att.net> wrote in message
> > > news:o e89KYUcFHA.3840@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> > > > I've removed two old 32 MB Ram modules from my Windows 98 Dell
> > computer
> > > > and replaced them with a new 128 MB module. With the increased
RAM
> > the
> > > > computer works fine. (Fantastic, in fact.)
> > > >
> > > > A friend has a Windows 98 computer with two 32 MB modules (or
maybe
> > one
> > > > 64 MB module). Can I simply add one (or two, if there's room)
of my
> > old
> > > > 32 MB modules into that other machine to increase its memory?
> > > >
> > > > Thanks,
> > > > Larry
> > > >
> > > >
> > >
> > >
> >
> >
>
>
June 17, 2005 1:00:03 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

By the way, when I started up the computer after installing the addition
RAM module, I held down the Ctrl key. That brought me to the Start up
menu, but I didn't see any option about BIOS or how to see if BIOS is
seeing the additional memory. How do I get to see the BIOS info?

However, after Windows started, I went to System Information, and it
showed the RAM as 95 MB (64 plus the additional 32, rounded off I
guess), so that would indicate that everything is A-OK.

Larry




"Larry" <larry328NOSPAM@att.net> wrote in message
news:o 7yRRVtcFHA.3060@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> My friend's computer did have the available slot, so I stuck in the
> module, started it up, and everything seems to be ok so far. Thanks,
> everyone.
>
> Larry
>
>
> "Lil' Dave" <spamyourself@virus.net> wrote in message
> news:o 2Y9nQmcFHA.220@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> > Pop the hood and look should answer the last unknown. You'll have
to
> do
> > that anyway if there is a DIMM socket available. Plug the DIMM in
the
> > socket.
> > Boot in stages.
> > Verify the bios sees the added physical memory first.
> > Boot to dos mode, and be alert for errors.
> > Do similar in windows safe mode next.
> > Then, if no I/O errors, boot into windows. Be alert for I/O errors
> for the
> > first hour or so.
> > "Larry" <larry328NOSPAM@att.net> wrote in message
> > news:u$X1f$ccFHA.3280@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> > > The specs are identical except that her computer has two DIMM
> sockets
> > > with a maximum RAM of 512, and mine has three DIMM sockets with
> maximum
> > > RAM of 384. So the only question is, is her current RAM a single
64
> MB
> > > module, leaving one socket free in which I could insert one of my
> extra
> > > 32 MB modules. Or does she have two 32 MB modules, in which case
> case
> > > all the available sockets are being used.
> > >
> > > I assume that if she has a 64 MB module in one socket, there is no
> > > problem in my sticking a 32 MB module in the other socket.
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > "Lil' Dave" <spamyourself@virus.net> wrote in message
> > > news:%23tA1afZcFHA.2664@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> > > > Safest answer is maybe. Based on what you apparently don't know
> about
> > > your
> > > > friend's PC under the hood contents, RAM module socket type, RAM
> > > timing
> > > > requirements of the current under hood RAM, RAM capacity of the
> > > chipset,
> > > > banking configuration, and what your current RAM module timing
> > > configuration
> > > > requirements are..
> > > >
> > > > "Larry" <larry328NOSPAM@att.net> wrote in message
> > > > news:o e89KYUcFHA.3840@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> > > > > I've removed two old 32 MB Ram modules from my Windows 98 Dell
> > > computer
> > > > > and replaced them with a new 128 MB module. With the
increased
> RAM
> > > the
> > > > > computer works fine. (Fantastic, in fact.)
> > > > >
> > > > > A friend has a Windows 98 computer with two 32 MB modules (or
> maybe
> > > one
> > > > > 64 MB module). Can I simply add one (or two, if there's room)
> of my
> > > old
> > > > > 32 MB modules into that other machine to increase its memory?
> > > > >
> > > > > Thanks,
> > > > > Larry
> > > > >
> > > > >
> > > >
> > > >
> > >
> > >
> >
> >
>
>
Anonymous
June 17, 2005 1:00:04 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

Entering the BIOS is usually done by pressing Del, F2, F10 or other combos of
keys. If you don't see the POST and see the OEM boot screen, you may have to
check the manufacturers site for info on entering the BIOS. If you supply the
make/model you may get a more definitive answer here.
If you do see the POST, press the Pause key and look in the lower left corner
for the BIOS setup key/s to use. Press any key to resume boot. You should also
see the memory count during the POST.

--

Brian A. Sesko
{ MS MVP_Shell/User }
Conflicts start where information lacks.
http://www.dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
http://basconotw.mvps.org/



"Larry" <larry328NOSPAM@att.net> wrote in message
news:ec8okdtcFHA.2760@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> By the way, when I started up the computer after installing the addition
> RAM module, I held down the Ctrl key. That brought me to the Start up
> menu, but I didn't see any option about BIOS or how to see if BIOS is
> seeing the additional memory. How do I get to see the BIOS info?
>
> However, after Windows started, I went to System Information, and it
> showed the RAM as 95 MB (64 plus the additional 32, rounded off I
> guess), so that would indicate that everything is A-OK.
>
> Larry
>
>
>
>
> "Larry" <larry328NOSPAM@att.net> wrote in message
> news:o 7yRRVtcFHA.3060@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
>> My friend's computer did have the available slot, so I stuck in the
>> module, started it up, and everything seems to be ok so far. Thanks,
>> everyone.
>>
>> Larry
>>
>>
>> "Lil' Dave" <spamyourself@virus.net> wrote in message
>> news:o 2Y9nQmcFHA.220@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
>> > Pop the hood and look should answer the last unknown. You'll have
> to
>> do
>> > that anyway if there is a DIMM socket available. Plug the DIMM in
> the
>> > socket.
>> > Boot in stages.
>> > Verify the bios sees the added physical memory first.
>> > Boot to dos mode, and be alert for errors.
>> > Do similar in windows safe mode next.
>> > Then, if no I/O errors, boot into windows. Be alert for I/O errors
>> for the
>> > first hour or so.
>> > "Larry" <larry328NOSPAM@att.net> wrote in message
>> > news:u$X1f$ccFHA.3280@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
>> > > The specs are identical except that her computer has two DIMM
>> sockets
>> > > with a maximum RAM of 512, and mine has three DIMM sockets with
>> maximum
>> > > RAM of 384. So the only question is, is her current RAM a single
> 64
>> MB
>> > > module, leaving one socket free in which I could insert one of my
>> extra
>> > > 32 MB modules. Or does she have two 32 MB modules, in which case
>> case
>> > > all the available sockets are being used.
>> > >
>> > > I assume that if she has a 64 MB module in one socket, there is no
>> > > problem in my sticking a 32 MB module in the other socket.
>> > >
>> > >
>> > >
>> > >
>> > >
>> > >
>> > > "Lil' Dave" <spamyourself@virus.net> wrote in message
>> > > news:%23tA1afZcFHA.2664@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
>> > > > Safest answer is maybe. Based on what you apparently don't know
>> about
>> > > your
>> > > > friend's PC under the hood contents, RAM module socket type, RAM
>> > > timing
>> > > > requirements of the current under hood RAM, RAM capacity of the
>> > > chipset,
>> > > > banking configuration, and what your current RAM module timing
>> > > configuration
>> > > > requirements are..
>> > > >
>> > > > "Larry" <larry328NOSPAM@att.net> wrote in message
>> > > > news:o e89KYUcFHA.3840@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
>> > > > > I've removed two old 32 MB Ram modules from my Windows 98 Dell
>> > > computer
>> > > > > and replaced them with a new 128 MB module. With the
> increased
>> RAM
>> > > the
>> > > > > computer works fine. (Fantastic, in fact.)
>> > > > >
>> > > > > A friend has a Windows 98 computer with two 32 MB modules (or
>> maybe
>> > > one
>> > > > > 64 MB module). Can I simply add one (or two, if there's room)
>> of my
>> > > old
>> > > > > 32 MB modules into that other machine to increase its memory?
>> > > > >
>> > > > > Thanks,
>> > > > > Larry
>> > > > >
>> > > > >
>> > > >
>> > > >
>> > >
>> > >
>> >
>> >
>>
>>
>
>
June 17, 2005 2:19:36 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

Well I'm curious about this because I'm not sure I've ever seen this
mysterious BIOS. I've started to the Startup menu many times, but not
BIOS.

My computer is a Dell Dimension V series from 1998.




"Brian A." <gonefish'n@afarawaylake> wrote in message
news:o fIeLwtcFHA.1404@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> Entering the BIOS is usually done by pressing Del, F2, F10 or other
combos of
> keys. If you don't see the POST and see the OEM boot screen, you may
have to
> check the manufacturers site for info on entering the BIOS. If you
supply the
> make/model you may get a more definitive answer here.
> If you do see the POST, press the Pause key and look in the lower
left corner
> for the BIOS setup key/s to use. Press any key to resume boot. You
should also
> see the memory count during the POST.
>
> --
>
> Brian A. Sesko
> { MS MVP_Shell/User }
> Conflicts start where information lacks.
> http://www.dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
> http://basconotw.mvps.org/
>
>
>
> "Larry" <larry328NOSPAM@att.net> wrote in message
> news:ec8okdtcFHA.2760@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> > By the way, when I started up the computer after installing the
addition
> > RAM module, I held down the Ctrl key. That brought me to the Start
up
> > menu, but I didn't see any option about BIOS or how to see if BIOS
is
> > seeing the additional memory. How do I get to see the BIOS info?
> >
> > However, after Windows started, I went to System Information, and it
> > showed the RAM as 95 MB (64 plus the additional 32, rounded off I
> > guess), so that would indicate that everything is A-OK.
> >
> > Larry
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > "Larry" <larry328NOSPAM@att.net> wrote in message
> > news:o 7yRRVtcFHA.3060@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> >> My friend's computer did have the available slot, so I stuck in the
> >> module, started it up, and everything seems to be ok so far.
Thanks,
> >> everyone.
> >>
> >> Larry
> >>
> >>
> >> "Lil' Dave" <spamyourself@virus.net> wrote in message
> >> news:o 2Y9nQmcFHA.220@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> >> > Pop the hood and look should answer the last unknown. You'll
have
> > to
> >> do
> >> > that anyway if there is a DIMM socket available. Plug the DIMM
in
> > the
> >> > socket.
> >> > Boot in stages.
> >> > Verify the bios sees the added physical memory first.
> >> > Boot to dos mode, and be alert for errors.
> >> > Do similar in windows safe mode next.
> >> > Then, if no I/O errors, boot into windows. Be alert for I/O
errors
> >> for the
> >> > first hour or so.
> >> > "Larry" <larry328NOSPAM@att.net> wrote in message
> >> > news:u$X1f$ccFHA.3280@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> >> > > The specs are identical except that her computer has two DIMM
> >> sockets
> >> > > with a maximum RAM of 512, and mine has three DIMM sockets with
> >> maximum
> >> > > RAM of 384. So the only question is, is her current RAM a
single
> > 64
> >> MB
> >> > > module, leaving one socket free in which I could insert one of
my
> >> extra
> >> > > 32 MB modules. Or does she have two 32 MB modules, in which
case
> >> case
> >> > > all the available sockets are being used.
> >> > >
> >> > > I assume that if she has a 64 MB module in one socket, there is
no
> >> > > problem in my sticking a 32 MB module in the other socket.
> >> > >
> >> > >
> >> > >
> >> > >
> >> > >
> >> > >
> >> > > "Lil' Dave" <spamyourself@virus.net> wrote in message
> >> > > news:%23tA1afZcFHA.2664@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> >> > > > Safest answer is maybe. Based on what you apparently don't
know
> >> about
> >> > > your
> >> > > > friend's PC under the hood contents, RAM module socket type,
RAM
> >> > > timing
> >> > > > requirements of the current under hood RAM, RAM capacity of
the
> >> > > chipset,
> >> > > > banking configuration, and what your current RAM module
timing
> >> > > configuration
> >> > > > requirements are..
> >> > > >
> >> > > > "Larry" <larry328NOSPAM@att.net> wrote in message
> >> > > > news:o e89KYUcFHA.3840@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> >> > > > > I've removed two old 32 MB Ram modules from my Windows 98
Dell
> >> > > computer
> >> > > > > and replaced them with a new 128 MB module. With the
> > increased
> >> RAM
> >> > > the
> >> > > > > computer works fine. (Fantastic, in fact.)
> >> > > > >
> >> > > > > A friend has a Windows 98 computer with two 32 MB modules
(or
> >> maybe
> >> > > one
> >> > > > > 64 MB module). Can I simply add one (or two, if there's
room)
> >> of my
> >> > > old
> >> > > > > 32 MB modules into that other machine to increase its
memory?
> >> > > > >
> >> > > > > Thanks,
> >> > > > > Larry
> >> > > > >
> >> > > > >
> >> > > >
> >> > > >
> >> > >
> >> > >
> >> >
> >> >
> >>
> >>
> >
> >
>
Anonymous
June 17, 2005 2:19:37 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

How do I enter the BIOS, CMOS, Setup, or System Setup on my DellT computer?
http://support.dell.com/support/topics/global.aspx/supp...

--

Brian A. Sesko
{ MS MVP_Shell/User }
Conflicts start where information lacks.
http://www.dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
http://basconotw.mvps.org/



"Larry" <larry328NOSPAM@att.net> wrote in message
news:uTKWDKucFHA.3712@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> Well I'm curious about this because I'm not sure I've ever seen this
> mysterious BIOS. I've started to the Startup menu many times, but not
> BIOS.
>
> My computer is a Dell Dimension V series from 1998.
>
>
>
>
> "Brian A." <gonefish'n@afarawaylake> wrote in message
> news:o fIeLwtcFHA.1404@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
>> Entering the BIOS is usually done by pressing Del, F2, F10 or other
> combos of
>> keys. If you don't see the POST and see the OEM boot screen, you may
> have to
>> check the manufacturers site for info on entering the BIOS. If you
> supply the
>> make/model you may get a more definitive answer here.
>> If you do see the POST, press the Pause key and look in the lower
> left corner
>> for the BIOS setup key/s to use. Press any key to resume boot. You
> should also
>> see the memory count during the POST.
>>
>> --
>>
>> Brian A. Sesko
>> { MS MVP_Shell/User }
>> Conflicts start where information lacks.
>> http://www.dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
>> http://basconotw.mvps.org/
>>
>>
>>
>> "Larry" <larry328NOSPAM@att.net> wrote in message
>> news:ec8okdtcFHA.2760@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
>> > By the way, when I started up the computer after installing the
> addition
>> > RAM module, I held down the Ctrl key. That brought me to the Start
> up
>> > menu, but I didn't see any option about BIOS or how to see if BIOS
> is
>> > seeing the additional memory. How do I get to see the BIOS info?
>> >
>> > However, after Windows started, I went to System Information, and it
>> > showed the RAM as 95 MB (64 plus the additional 32, rounded off I
>> > guess), so that would indicate that everything is A-OK.
>> >
>> > Larry
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> > "Larry" <larry328NOSPAM@att.net> wrote in message
>> > news:o 7yRRVtcFHA.3060@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
>> >> My friend's computer did have the available slot, so I stuck in the
>> >> module, started it up, and everything seems to be ok so far.
> Thanks,
>> >> everyone.
>> >>
>> >> Larry
>> >>
>> >>
>> >> "Lil' Dave" <spamyourself@virus.net> wrote in message
>> >> news:o 2Y9nQmcFHA.220@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
>> >> > Pop the hood and look should answer the last unknown. You'll
> have
>> > to
>> >> do
>> >> > that anyway if there is a DIMM socket available. Plug the DIMM
> in
>> > the
>> >> > socket.
>> >> > Boot in stages.
>> >> > Verify the bios sees the added physical memory first.
>> >> > Boot to dos mode, and be alert for errors.
>> >> > Do similar in windows safe mode next.
>> >> > Then, if no I/O errors, boot into windows. Be alert for I/O
> errors
>> >> for the
>> >> > first hour or so.
>> >> > "Larry" <larry328NOSPAM@att.net> wrote in message
>> >> > news:u$X1f$ccFHA.3280@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
>> >> > > The specs are identical except that her computer has two DIMM
>> >> sockets
>> >> > > with a maximum RAM of 512, and mine has three DIMM sockets with
>> >> maximum
>> >> > > RAM of 384. So the only question is, is her current RAM a
> single
>> > 64
>> >> MB
>> >> > > module, leaving one socket free in which I could insert one of
> my
>> >> extra
>> >> > > 32 MB modules. Or does she have two 32 MB modules, in which
> case
>> >> case
>> >> > > all the available sockets are being used.
>> >> > >
>> >> > > I assume that if she has a 64 MB module in one socket, there is
> no
>> >> > > problem in my sticking a 32 MB module in the other socket.
>> >> > >
>> >> > >
>> >> > >
>> >> > >
>> >> > >
>> >> > >
>> >> > > "Lil' Dave" <spamyourself@virus.net> wrote in message
>> >> > > news:%23tA1afZcFHA.2664@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
>> >> > > > Safest answer is maybe. Based on what you apparently don't
> know
>> >> about
>> >> > > your
>> >> > > > friend's PC under the hood contents, RAM module socket type,
> RAM
>> >> > > timing
>> >> > > > requirements of the current under hood RAM, RAM capacity of
> the
>> >> > > chipset,
>> >> > > > banking configuration, and what your current RAM module
> timing
>> >> > > configuration
>> >> > > > requirements are..
>> >> > > >
>> >> > > > "Larry" <larry328NOSPAM@att.net> wrote in message
>> >> > > > news:o e89KYUcFHA.3840@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
>> >> > > > > I've removed two old 32 MB Ram modules from my Windows 98
> Dell
>> >> > > computer
>> >> > > > > and replaced them with a new 128 MB module. With the
>> > increased
>> >> RAM
>> >> > > the
>> >> > > > > computer works fine. (Fantastic, in fact.)
>> >> > > > >
>> >> > > > > A friend has a Windows 98 computer with two 32 MB modules
> (or
>> >> maybe
>> >> > > one
>> >> > > > > 64 MB module). Can I simply add one (or two, if there's
> room)
>> >> of my
>> >> > > old
>> >> > > > > 32 MB modules into that other machine to increase its
> memory?
>> >> > > > >
>> >> > > > > Thanks,
>> >> > > > > Larry
>> >> > > > >
>> >> > > > >
>> >> > > >
>> >> > > >
>> >> > >
>> >> > >
>> >> >
>> >> >
>> >>
>> >>
>> >
>> >
>>
>
>
June 17, 2005 5:23:43 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

Brian, that's really funny--for each line of Dell computers, there's a
different button to press to enter BIOS. Usually things like this are
consistent across all computers. Anyway, for Dell Dimension, you press
Delete as the system is starting up.

Thanks,

Larry






"Brian A." <gonefish'n@afarawaylake> wrote in message
news:%23OsKueucFHA.1404@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> How do I enter the BIOS, CMOS, Setup, or System Setup on my DellT
computer?
>
http://support.dell.com/support/topics/global.aspx/supp...
>
> --
>
> Brian A. Sesko
> { MS MVP_Shell/User }
> Conflicts start where information lacks.
> http://www.dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
> http://basconotw.mvps.org/
>
>
>
> "Larry" <larry328NOSPAM@att.net> wrote in message
> news:uTKWDKucFHA.3712@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> > Well I'm curious about this because I'm not sure I've ever seen
this
> > mysterious BIOS. I've started to the Startup menu many times, but
not
> > BIOS.
> >
> > My computer is a Dell Dimension V series from 1998.
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > "Brian A." <gonefish'n@afarawaylake> wrote in message
> > news:o fIeLwtcFHA.1404@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> >> Entering the BIOS is usually done by pressing Del, F2, F10 or other
> > combos of
> >> keys. If you don't see the POST and see the OEM boot screen, you
may
> > have to
> >> check the manufacturers site for info on entering the BIOS. If you
> > supply the
> >> make/model you may get a more definitive answer here.
> >> If you do see the POST, press the Pause key and look in the lower
> > left corner
> >> for the BIOS setup key/s to use. Press any key to resume boot. You
> > should also
> >> see the memory count during the POST.
> >>
> >> --
> >>
> >> Brian A. Sesko
> >> { MS MVP_Shell/User }
> >> Conflicts start where information lacks.
> >> http://www.dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
> >> http://basconotw.mvps.org/
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> "Larry" <larry328NOSPAM@att.net> wrote in message
> >> news:ec8okdtcFHA.2760@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> >> > By the way, when I started up the computer after installing the
> > addition
> >> > RAM module, I held down the Ctrl key. That brought me to the
Start
> > up
> >> > menu, but I didn't see any option about BIOS or how to see if
BIOS
> > is
> >> > seeing the additional memory. How do I get to see the BIOS info?
> >> >
> >> > However, after Windows started, I went to System Information, and
it
> >> > showed the RAM as 95 MB (64 plus the additional 32, rounded off I
> >> > guess), so that would indicate that everything is A-OK.
> >> >
> >> > Larry
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >
> >> > "Larry" <larry328NOSPAM@att.net> wrote in message
> >> > news:o 7yRRVtcFHA.3060@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> >> >> My friend's computer did have the available slot, so I stuck in
the
> >> >> module, started it up, and everything seems to be ok so far.
> > Thanks,
> >> >> everyone.
> >> >>
> >> >> Larry
> >> >>
> >> >>
> >> >> "Lil' Dave" <spamyourself@virus.net> wrote in message
> >> >> news:o 2Y9nQmcFHA.220@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> >> >> > Pop the hood and look should answer the last unknown. You'll
> > have
> >> > to
> >> >> do
> >> >> > that anyway if there is a DIMM socket available. Plug the
DIMM
> > in
> >> > the
> >> >> > socket.
> >> >> > Boot in stages.
> >> >> > Verify the bios sees the added physical memory first.
> >> >> > Boot to dos mode, and be alert for errors.
> >> >> > Do similar in windows safe mode next.
> >> >> > Then, if no I/O errors, boot into windows. Be alert for I/O
> > errors
> >> >> for the
> >> >> > first hour or so.
> >> >> > "Larry" <larry328NOSPAM@att.net> wrote in message
> >> >> > news:u$X1f$ccFHA.3280@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> >> >> > > The specs are identical except that her computer has two
DIMM
> >> >> sockets
> >> >> > > with a maximum RAM of 512, and mine has three DIMM sockets
with
> >> >> maximum
> >> >> > > RAM of 384. So the only question is, is her current RAM a
> > single
> >> > 64
> >> >> MB
> >> >> > > module, leaving one socket free in which I could insert one
of
> > my
> >> >> extra
> >> >> > > 32 MB modules. Or does she have two 32 MB modules, in which
> > case
> >> >> case
> >> >> > > all the available sockets are being used.
> >> >> > >
> >> >> > > I assume that if she has a 64 MB module in one socket, there
is
> > no
> >> >> > > problem in my sticking a 32 MB module in the other socket.
> >> >> > >
> >> >> > >
> >> >> > >
> >> >> > >
> >> >> > >
> >> >> > >
> >> >> > > "Lil' Dave" <spamyourself@virus.net> wrote in message
> >> >> > > news:%23tA1afZcFHA.2664@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> >> >> > > > Safest answer is maybe. Based on what you apparently
don't
> > know
> >> >> about
> >> >> > > your
> >> >> > > > friend's PC under the hood contents, RAM module socket
type,
> > RAM
> >> >> > > timing
> >> >> > > > requirements of the current under hood RAM, RAM capacity
of
> > the
> >> >> > > chipset,
> >> >> > > > banking configuration, and what your current RAM module
> > timing
> >> >> > > configuration
> >> >> > > > requirements are..
> >> >> > > >
> >> >> > > > "Larry" <larry328NOSPAM@att.net> wrote in message
> >> >> > > > news:o e89KYUcFHA.3840@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> >> >> > > > > I've removed two old 32 MB Ram modules from my Windows
98
> > Dell
> >> >> > > computer
> >> >> > > > > and replaced them with a new 128 MB module. With the
> >> > increased
> >> >> RAM
> >> >> > > the
> >> >> > > > > computer works fine. (Fantastic, in fact.)
> >> >> > > > >
> >> >> > > > > A friend has a Windows 98 computer with two 32 MB
modules
> > (or
> >> >> maybe
> >> >> > > one
> >> >> > > > > 64 MB module). Can I simply add one (or two, if there's
> > room)
> >> >> of my
> >> >> > > old
> >> >> > > > > 32 MB modules into that other machine to increase its
> > memory?
> >> >> > > > >
> >> >> > > > > Thanks,
> >> >> > > > > Larry
> >> >> > > > >
> >> >> > > > >
> >> >> > > >
> >> >> > > >
> >> >> > >
> >> >> > >
> >> >> >
> >> >> >
> >> >>
> >> >>
> >> >
> >> >
> >>
> >
> >
>
Anonymous
June 17, 2005 7:08:51 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

No, they are not consistent. As mentioned earlier, there are many different ways
to enter a BIOS. IIRC some even use a 4 key combo.

--

Brian A. Sesko
{ MS MVP_Shell/User }
Conflicts start where information lacks.
http://www.dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
http://basconotw.mvps.org/



"Larry" <larry328NOSPAM@att.net> wrote in message
news:%23ohY7wvcFHA.3912@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> Brian, that's really funny--for each line of Dell computers, there's a
> different button to press to enter BIOS. Usually things like this are
> consistent across all computers. Anyway, for Dell Dimension, you press
> Delete as the system is starting up.
>
> Thanks,
>
> Larry
>
>
>
>
>
>
> "Brian A." <gonefish'n@afarawaylake> wrote in message
> news:%23OsKueucFHA.1404@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
>> How do I enter the BIOS, CMOS, Setup, or System Setup on my DellT
> computer?
>>
> http://support.dell.com/support/topics/global.aspx/supp...
>>
>> --
>>
>> Brian A. Sesko
>> { MS MVP_Shell/User }
>> Conflicts start where information lacks.
>> http://www.dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
>> http://basconotw.mvps.org/
>>
>>
>>
>> "Larry" <larry328NOSPAM@att.net> wrote in message
>> news:uTKWDKucFHA.3712@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
>> > Well I'm curious about this because I'm not sure I've ever seen
> this
>> > mysterious BIOS. I've started to the Startup menu many times, but
> not
>> > BIOS.
>> >
>> > My computer is a Dell Dimension V series from 1998.
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> > "Brian A." <gonefish'n@afarawaylake> wrote in message
>> > news:o fIeLwtcFHA.1404@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
>> >> Entering the BIOS is usually done by pressing Del, F2, F10 or other
>> > combos of
>> >> keys. If you don't see the POST and see the OEM boot screen, you
> may
>> > have to
>> >> check the manufacturers site for info on entering the BIOS. If you
>> > supply the
>> >> make/model you may get a more definitive answer here.
>> >> If you do see the POST, press the Pause key and look in the lower
>> > left corner
>> >> for the BIOS setup key/s to use. Press any key to resume boot. You
>> > should also
>> >> see the memory count during the POST.
>> >>
>> >> --
>> >>
>> >> Brian A. Sesko
>> >> { MS MVP_Shell/User }
>> >> Conflicts start where information lacks.
>> >> http://www.dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
>> >> http://basconotw.mvps.org/
>> >>
>> >>
>> >>
>> >> "Larry" <larry328NOSPAM@att.net> wrote in message
>> >> news:ec8okdtcFHA.2760@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
>> >> > By the way, when I started up the computer after installing the
>> > addition
>> >> > RAM module, I held down the Ctrl key. That brought me to the
> Start
>> > up
>> >> > menu, but I didn't see any option about BIOS or how to see if
> BIOS
>> > is
>> >> > seeing the additional memory. How do I get to see the BIOS info?
>> >> >
>> >> > However, after Windows started, I went to System Information, and
> it
>> >> > showed the RAM as 95 MB (64 plus the additional 32, rounded off I
>> >> > guess), so that would indicate that everything is A-OK.
>> >> >
>> >> > Larry
>> >> >
>> >> >
>> >> >
>> >> >
>> >> > "Larry" <larry328NOSPAM@att.net> wrote in message
>> >> > news:o 7yRRVtcFHA.3060@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
>> >> >> My friend's computer did have the available slot, so I stuck in
> the
>> >> >> module, started it up, and everything seems to be ok so far.
>> > Thanks,
>> >> >> everyone.
>> >> >>
>> >> >> Larry
>> >> >>
>> >> >>
>> >> >> "Lil' Dave" <spamyourself@virus.net> wrote in message
>> >> >> news:o 2Y9nQmcFHA.220@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
>> >> >> > Pop the hood and look should answer the last unknown. You'll
>> > have
>> >> > to
>> >> >> do
>> >> >> > that anyway if there is a DIMM socket available. Plug the
> DIMM
>> > in
>> >> > the
>> >> >> > socket.
>> >> >> > Boot in stages.
>> >> >> > Verify the bios sees the added physical memory first.
>> >> >> > Boot to dos mode, and be alert for errors.
>> >> >> > Do similar in windows safe mode next.
>> >> >> > Then, if no I/O errors, boot into windows. Be alert for I/O
>> > errors
>> >> >> for the
>> >> >> > first hour or so.
>> >> >> > "Larry" <larry328NOSPAM@att.net> wrote in message
>> >> >> > news:u$X1f$ccFHA.3280@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
>> >> >> > > The specs are identical except that her computer has two
> DIMM
>> >> >> sockets
>> >> >> > > with a maximum RAM of 512, and mine has three DIMM sockets
> with
>> >> >> maximum
>> >> >> > > RAM of 384. So the only question is, is her current RAM a
>> > single
>> >> > 64
>> >> >> MB
>> >> >> > > module, leaving one socket free in which I could insert one
> of
>> > my
>> >> >> extra
>> >> >> > > 32 MB modules. Or does she have two 32 MB modules, in which
>> > case
>> >> >> case
>> >> >> > > all the available sockets are being used.
>> >> >> > >
>> >> >> > > I assume that if she has a 64 MB module in one socket, there
> is
>> > no
>> >> >> > > problem in my sticking a 32 MB module in the other socket.
>> >> >> > >
>> >> >> > >
>> >> >> > >
>> >> >> > >
>> >> >> > >
>> >> >> > >
>> >> >> > > "Lil' Dave" <spamyourself@virus.net> wrote in message
>> >> >> > > news:%23tA1afZcFHA.2664@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
>> >> >> > > > Safest answer is maybe. Based on what you apparently
> don't
>> > know
>> >> >> about
>> >> >> > > your
>> >> >> > > > friend's PC under the hood contents, RAM module socket
> type,
>> > RAM
>> >> >> > > timing
>> >> >> > > > requirements of the current under hood RAM, RAM capacity
> of
>> > the
>> >> >> > > chipset,
>> >> >> > > > banking configuration, and what your current RAM module
>> > timing
>> >> >> > > configuration
>> >> >> > > > requirements are..
>> >> >> > > >
>> >> >> > > > "Larry" <larry328NOSPAM@att.net> wrote in message
>> >> >> > > > news:o e89KYUcFHA.3840@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
>> >> >> > > > > I've removed two old 32 MB Ram modules from my Windows
> 98
>> > Dell
>> >> >> > > computer
>> >> >> > > > > and replaced them with a new 128 MB module. With the
>> >> > increased
>> >> >> RAM
>> >> >> > > the
>> >> >> > > > > computer works fine. (Fantastic, in fact.)
>> >> >> > > > >
>> >> >> > > > > A friend has a Windows 98 computer with two 32 MB
> modules
>> > (or
>> >> >> maybe
>> >> >> > > one
>> >> >> > > > > 64 MB module). Can I simply add one (or two, if there's
>> > room)
>> >> >> of my
>> >> >> > > old
>> >> >> > > > > 32 MB modules into that other machine to increase its
>> > memory?
>> >> >> > > > >
>> >> >> > > > > Thanks,
>> >> >> > > > > Larry
>> >> >> > > > >
>> >> >> > > > >
>> >> >> > > >
>> >> >> > > >
>> >> >> > >
>> >> >> > >
>> >> >> >
>> >> >> >
>> >> >>
>> >> >>
>> >> >
>> >> >
>> >>
>> >
>> >
>>
>
>
Anonymous
June 21, 2005 11:36:11 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

The key you press to access the bios setup varies between the bios software
manufacturers. Some are exclusive to the PC brand name as they don't buy a
bios to put on their PCs. "Delete" key entry has been default for the Award
made bios for many, many years.
The PC manufacturer can buy a generic bios software, and tailor it somewhat
for their PCs. Including adding a small image, like the PC makers name in
the bios noted during inital boot. The key to press for the Award bios is
usually noted initially when cold booting the PC, "del" on the lower LH
side..
Phoenix bought out Award a couple of years ago. But you can still access
support info on the Award bios at the Phoenix website.

"Larry" <larry328NOSPAM@att.net> wrote in message
news:%23ohY7wvcFHA.3912@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> Brian, that's really funny--for each line of Dell computers, there's a
> different button to press to enter BIOS. Usually things like this are
> consistent across all computers. Anyway, for Dell Dimension, you press
> Delete as the system is starting up.
>
> Thanks,
>
> Larry
>
>
>
>
>
>
> "Brian A." <gonefish'n@afarawaylake> wrote in message
> news:%23OsKueucFHA.1404@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> > How do I enter the BIOS, CMOS, Setup, or System Setup on my DellT
> computer?
> >
>
http://support.dell.com/support/topics/global.aspx/supp...
> >
> > --
> >
> > Brian A. Sesko
> > { MS MVP_Shell/User }
> > Conflicts start where information lacks.
> > http://www.dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
> > http://basconotw.mvps.org/
> >
> >
> >
> > "Larry" <larry328NOSPAM@att.net> wrote in message
> > news:uTKWDKucFHA.3712@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> > > Well I'm curious about this because I'm not sure I've ever seen
> this
> > > mysterious BIOS. I've started to the Startup menu many times, but
> not
> > > BIOS.
> > >
> > > My computer is a Dell Dimension V series from 1998.
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > "Brian A." <gonefish'n@afarawaylake> wrote in message
> > > news:o fIeLwtcFHA.1404@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> > >> Entering the BIOS is usually done by pressing Del, F2, F10 or other
> > > combos of
> > >> keys. If you don't see the POST and see the OEM boot screen, you
> may
> > > have to
> > >> check the manufacturers site for info on entering the BIOS. If you
> > > supply the
> > >> make/model you may get a more definitive answer here.
> > >> If you do see the POST, press the Pause key and look in the lower
> > > left corner
> > >> for the BIOS setup key/s to use. Press any key to resume boot. You
> > > should also
> > >> see the memory count during the POST.
> > >>
> > >> --
> > >>
> > >> Brian A. Sesko
> > >> { MS MVP_Shell/User }
> > >> Conflicts start where information lacks.
> > >> http://www.dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
> > >> http://basconotw.mvps.org/
> > >>
> > >>
> > >>
> > >> "Larry" <larry328NOSPAM@att.net> wrote in message
> > >> news:ec8okdtcFHA.2760@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> > >> > By the way, when I started up the computer after installing the
> > > addition
> > >> > RAM module, I held down the Ctrl key. That brought me to the
> Start
> > > up
> > >> > menu, but I didn't see any option about BIOS or how to see if
> BIOS
> > > is
> > >> > seeing the additional memory. How do I get to see the BIOS info?
> > >> >
> > >> > However, after Windows started, I went to System Information, and
> it
> > >> > showed the RAM as 95 MB (64 plus the additional 32, rounded off I
> > >> > guess), so that would indicate that everything is A-OK.
> > >> >
> > >> > Larry
> > >> >
> > >> >
> > >> >
> > >> >
> > >> > "Larry" <larry328NOSPAM@att.net> wrote in message
> > >> > news:o 7yRRVtcFHA.3060@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> > >> >> My friend's computer did have the available slot, so I stuck in
> the
> > >> >> module, started it up, and everything seems to be ok so far.
> > > Thanks,
> > >> >> everyone.
> > >> >>
> > >> >> Larry
> > >> >>
> > >> >>
> > >> >> "Lil' Dave" <spamyourself@virus.net> wrote in message
> > >> >> news:o 2Y9nQmcFHA.220@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> > >> >> > Pop the hood and look should answer the last unknown. You'll
> > > have
> > >> > to
> > >> >> do
> > >> >> > that anyway if there is a DIMM socket available. Plug the
> DIMM
> > > in
> > >> > the
> > >> >> > socket.
> > >> >> > Boot in stages.
> > >> >> > Verify the bios sees the added physical memory first.
> > >> >> > Boot to dos mode, and be alert for errors.
> > >> >> > Do similar in windows safe mode next.
> > >> >> > Then, if no I/O errors, boot into windows. Be alert for I/O
> > > errors
> > >> >> for the
> > >> >> > first hour or so.
> > >> >> > "Larry" <larry328NOSPAM@att.net> wrote in message
> > >> >> > news:u$X1f$ccFHA.3280@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> > >> >> > > The specs are identical except that her computer has two
> DIMM
> > >> >> sockets
> > >> >> > > with a maximum RAM of 512, and mine has three DIMM sockets
> with
> > >> >> maximum
> > >> >> > > RAM of 384. So the only question is, is her current RAM a
> > > single
> > >> > 64
> > >> >> MB
> > >> >> > > module, leaving one socket free in which I could insert one
> of
> > > my
> > >> >> extra
> > >> >> > > 32 MB modules. Or does she have two 32 MB modules, in which
> > > case
> > >> >> case
> > >> >> > > all the available sockets are being used.
> > >> >> > >
> > >> >> > > I assume that if she has a 64 MB module in one socket, there
> is
> > > no
> > >> >> > > problem in my sticking a 32 MB module in the other socket.
> > >> >> > >
> > >> >> > >
> > >> >> > >
> > >> >> > >
> > >> >> > >
> > >> >> > >
> > >> >> > > "Lil' Dave" <spamyourself@virus.net> wrote in message
> > >> >> > > news:%23tA1afZcFHA.2664@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> > >> >> > > > Safest answer is maybe. Based on what you apparently
> don't
> > > know
> > >> >> about
> > >> >> > > your
> > >> >> > > > friend's PC under the hood contents, RAM module socket
> type,
> > > RAM
> > >> >> > > timing
> > >> >> > > > requirements of the current under hood RAM, RAM capacity
> of
> > > the
> > >> >> > > chipset,
> > >> >> > > > banking configuration, and what your current RAM module
> > > timing
> > >> >> > > configuration
> > >> >> > > > requirements are..
> > >> >> > > >
> > >> >> > > > "Larry" <larry328NOSPAM@att.net> wrote in message
> > >> >> > > > news:o e89KYUcFHA.3840@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> > >> >> > > > > I've removed two old 32 MB Ram modules from my Windows
> 98
> > > Dell
> > >> >> > > computer
> > >> >> > > > > and replaced them with a new 128 MB module. With the
> > >> > increased
> > >> >> RAM
> > >> >> > > the
> > >> >> > > > > computer works fine. (Fantastic, in fact.)
> > >> >> > > > >
> > >> >> > > > > A friend has a Windows 98 computer with two 32 MB
> modules
> > > (or
> > >> >> maybe
> > >> >> > > one
> > >> >> > > > > 64 MB module). Can I simply add one (or two, if there's
> > > room)
> > >> >> of my
> > >> >> > > old
> > >> >> > > > > 32 MB modules into that other machine to increase its
> > > memory?
> > >> >> > > > >
> > >> >> > > > > Thanks,
> > >> >> > > > > Larry
> > >> >> > > > >
> > >> >> > > > >
> > >> >> > > >
> > >> >> > > >
> > >> >> > >
> > >> >> > >
> > >> >> >
> > >> >> >
> > >> >>
> > >> >>
> > >> >
> > >> >
> > >>
> > >
> > >
> >
>
>
!