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Memory slot question

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Anonymous
a b } Memory
September 6, 2005 12:11:34 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

Hi all,
Have decided to load up some more memory into this old beast, after installing a firewire port to enable my Vidcam to download from the tape, not just the memory card - works fine, though slow, but that's OK. I've never got an out of memory error - yet!
Bios tells me Dram bank 0 SDRAM Dram bank 1 NONE. I have 64MB of total memory.
I don't want to overload the thing. Can I just chuck a module in the spare slot? Or should I take out the 64MB and insert a 256MB in same slot and leave the original empty slot empty. This is the product I was thinking of, as I can get it locally.

http://www.dse.com.au/cgi-bin/dse.storefront/431cdc450a...

After this, am having a go at a second hard drive - where does it all end ...............

Thanks for any suggestions,
--
* * Pebble in Boulder * *
who would never underestimate the humble floppy
--

Name: MULTIMEDIA 800AU*
Microprocessor: Intel Pentium Ill 800MHz
RAM: 64MB
Video Memory: 8MB (VooDoo 3 2000)
Hard Disk: 20GB
Operating System: Windows '98 SE
OE v 5.50.4807.1700
IE v 5.50.4807.2300IC

More about : memory slot question

Anonymous
a b } Memory
September 6, 2005 12:11:35 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

There is no knowing what RAM is appropriate for your system without knowing
the exact make/model of the motherboard (or of the computer in the case of
its being a major brand name.) The *only* good RAM for that system is
whatever is recommended for your system.

In general, RAM likes to be matched. Even if you used Crucial.com, my
favorite RAM supplier, the stick I get from them may not play well with what
is already installed.

My recommendations:

You must have the right RAM for your system. If the vendor can't positively
identify its RAM as being appropriate for your system (using a model by
model database) then I would recommend against it. I would find the right
RAM. I would *not* buy what your link suggests unless I knew how you decided
that was the right stuff for you.

I would look at the pricing involved when determining what to buy. If the
128 MB is substantially cheaper than 2 each of the 64 MB version, then I
would recommend just getting the 128 MB stick and putting it into the first
slot (DRAM Bank 0) by itself. Run it for a while that way, and if everything
seems OK, put the old 64MB stick into the second slot (DRAM Bank 1). If it
remains stable, fine, otherwise it's a write-off.

You *can* get just one 64 MB and try adding it into the second slot, or even
swap them. If it works, great. If not, you'll have to buy another 64MB stick
and replace the old one. The gamble is that your least expensive option--one
64MB stick--will work. If not, you'll be paying for two 64MB sticks, instead
of writing off your current RAM (unless it happens to work) and installing
128 MB immediately at, presumably, a cost much less than 2x64MB sticks.

--
Gary S. Terhune
MS-MVP Shell/User


"Pebble" <Pebble@boulder.rock.com> wrote in message
news:u939pdnsFHA.3732@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
Hi all,
Have decided to load up some more memory into this old beast, after
installing a firewire port to enable my Vidcam to download from the tape,
not just the memory card - works fine, though slow, but that's OK. I've
never got an out of memory error - yet!
Bios tells me Dram bank 0 SDRAM Dram bank 1 NONE. I have 64MB of total
memory.
I don't want to overload the thing. Can I just chuck a module in the spare
slot? Or should I take out the 64MB and insert a 256MB in same slot and
leave the original empty slot empty. This is the product I was thinking of,
as I can get it locally.

http://www.dse.com.au/cgi-bin/dse.storefront/431cdc450a...

After this, am having a go at a second hard drive - where does it all end
................

Thanks for any suggestions,
--
* * Pebble in Boulder * *
who would never underestimate the humble floppy
--

Name: MULTIMEDIA 800AU*
Microprocessor: Intel Pentium Ill 800MHz
RAM: 64MB
Video Memory: 8MB (VooDoo 3 2000)
Hard Disk: 20GB
Operating System: Windows '98 SE
OE v 5.50.4807.1700
IE v 5.50.4807.2300IC
Anonymous
a b } Memory
September 6, 2005 12:11:35 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

Just stick new RAM in.
Related resources
Anonymous
a b } Memory
September 6, 2005 12:11:36 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

Addendum: Make sure you blow out the slot that's remained empty all this
time. Check it closely for lint, dust, etc. Also pull the existing stick,
clean its contacts using a pencil eraser, then re-seat it.

--
Gary S. Terhune
MS-MVP Shell/User

"Gary S. Terhune" <grystnews@mvps.org> wrote in message
news:o ca2CsnsFHA.2064@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> There is no knowing what RAM is appropriate for your system without
> knowing the exact make/model of the motherboard (or of the computer in the
> case of its being a major brand name.) The *only* good RAM for that system
> is whatever is recommended for your system.
>
> In general, RAM likes to be matched. Even if you used Crucial.com, my
> favorite RAM supplier, the stick I get from them may not play well with
> what is already installed.
>
> My recommendations:
>
> You must have the right RAM for your system. If the vendor can't
> positively identify its RAM as being appropriate for your system (using a
> model by model database) then I would recommend against it. I would find
> the right RAM. I would *not* buy what your link suggests unless I knew how
> you decided that was the right stuff for you.
>
> I would look at the pricing involved when determining what to buy. If the
> 128 MB is substantially cheaper than 2 each of the 64 MB version, then I
> would recommend just getting the 128 MB stick and putting it into the
> first slot (DRAM Bank 0) by itself. Run it for a while that way, and if
> everything seems OK, put the old 64MB stick into the second slot (DRAM
> Bank 1). If it remains stable, fine, otherwise it's a write-off.
>
> You *can* get just one 64 MB and try adding it into the second slot, or
> even swap them. If it works, great. If not, you'll have to buy another
> 64MB stick and replace the old one. The gamble is that your least
> expensive option--one 64MB stick--will work. If not, you'll be paying for
> two 64MB sticks, instead of writing off your current RAM (unless it
> happens to work) and installing 128 MB immediately at, presumably, a cost
> much less than 2x64MB sticks.
>
> --
> Gary S. Terhune
> MS-MVP Shell/User
>
>
> "Pebble" <Pebble@boulder.rock.com> wrote in message
> news:u939pdnsFHA.3732@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
> Hi all,
> Have decided to load up some more memory into this old beast, after
> installing a firewire port to enable my Vidcam to download from the tape,
> not just the memory card - works fine, though slow, but that's OK. I've
> never got an out of memory error - yet!
> Bios tells me Dram bank 0 SDRAM Dram bank 1 NONE. I have 64MB of total
> memory.
> I don't want to overload the thing. Can I just chuck a module in the
> spare slot? Or should I take out the 64MB and insert a 256MB in same slot
> and leave the original empty slot empty. This is the product I was
> thinking of, as I can get it locally.
>
> http://www.dse.com.au/cgi-bin/dse.storefront/431cdc450a...
>
> After this, am having a go at a second hard drive - where does it all end
> ...............
>
> Thanks for any suggestions,
> --
> * * Pebble in Boulder * *
> who would never underestimate the humble floppy
> --
>
> Name: MULTIMEDIA 800AU*
> Microprocessor: Intel Pentium Ill 800MHz
> RAM: 64MB
> Video Memory: 8MB (VooDoo 3 2000)
> Hard Disk: 20GB
> Operating System: Windows '98 SE
> OE v 5.50.4807.1700
> IE v 5.50.4807.2300IC
>
>
>
Anonymous
a b } Memory
September 6, 2005 12:11:37 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

http://www.crucial.com has a great memory locator script / facility, if you
can fill in the make and model of your PC or motherboard. It helps avoid
single/double sided and other incompatibilities.

regards, Richard


"Gary S. Terhune" <grystnews@mvps.org> wrote in message
news:o kA2JvnsFHA.4052@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> Addendum: Make sure you blow out the slot that's remained empty all this
> time. Check it closely for lint, dust, etc. Also pull the existing stick,
> clean its contacts using a pencil eraser, then re-seat it.
>
> --
> Gary S. Terhune
> MS-MVP Shell/User
>
> "Gary S. Terhune" <grystnews@mvps.org> wrote in message
> news:o ca2CsnsFHA.2064@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
>> There is no knowing what RAM is appropriate for your system without
>> knowing the exact make/model of the motherboard (or of the computer in
>> the case of its being a major brand name.) The *only* good RAM for that
>> system is whatever is recommended for your system.
>>
>> In general, RAM likes to be matched. Even if you used Crucial.com, my
>> favorite RAM supplier, the stick I get from them may not play well with
>> what is already installed.
>>
>> My recommendations:
>>
>> You must have the right RAM for your system. If the vendor can't
>> positively identify its RAM as being appropriate for your system (using a
>> model by model database) then I would recommend against it. I would find
>> the right RAM. I would *not* buy what your link suggests unless I knew
>> how you decided that was the right stuff for you.
>>
>> I would look at the pricing involved when determining what to buy. If the
>> 128 MB is substantially cheaper than 2 each of the 64 MB version, then I
>> would recommend just getting the 128 MB stick and putting it into the
>> first slot (DRAM Bank 0) by itself. Run it for a while that way, and if
>> everything seems OK, put the old 64MB stick into the second slot (DRAM
>> Bank 1). If it remains stable, fine, otherwise it's a write-off.
>>
>> You *can* get just one 64 MB and try adding it into the second slot, or
>> even swap them. If it works, great. If not, you'll have to buy another
>> 64MB stick and replace the old one. The gamble is that your least
>> expensive option--one 64MB stick--will work. If not, you'll be paying for
>> two 64MB sticks, instead of writing off your current RAM (unless it
>> happens to work) and installing 128 MB immediately at, presumably, a cost
>> much less than 2x64MB sticks.
>>
>> --
>> Gary S. Terhune
>> MS-MVP Shell/User
>>
>>
>> "Pebble" <Pebble@boulder.rock.com> wrote in message
>> news:u939pdnsFHA.3732@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
>> Hi all,
>> Have decided to load up some more memory into this old beast, after
>> installing a firewire port to enable my Vidcam to download from the tape,
>> not just the memory card - works fine, though slow, but that's OK. I've
>> never got an out of memory error - yet!
>> Bios tells me Dram bank 0 SDRAM Dram bank 1 NONE. I have 64MB of total
>> memory.
>> I don't want to overload the thing. Can I just chuck a module in the
>> spare slot? Or should I take out the 64MB and insert a 256MB in same slot
>> and leave the original empty slot empty. This is the product I was
>> thinking of, as I can get it locally.
>>
>> http://www.dse.com.au/cgi-bin/dse.storefront/431cdc450a...
>>
>> After this, am having a go at a second hard drive - where does it all end
>> ...............
>>
>> Thanks for any suggestions,
>> --
>> * * Pebble in Boulder * *
>> who would never underestimate the humble floppy
>> --
>>
>> Name: MULTIMEDIA 800AU*
>> Microprocessor: Intel Pentium Ill 800MHz
>> RAM: 64MB
>> Video Memory: 8MB (VooDoo 3 2000)
>> Hard Disk: 20GB
>> Operating System: Windows '98 SE
>> OE v 5.50.4807.1700
>> IE v 5.50.4807.2300IC
>>
>>
>>
>
>
Anonymous
a b } Memory
September 6, 2005 9:58:07 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

Hi all and thanks for replies,
I came about the info for memory for my system from many sources - Everest home edition, Belarc advisor, printout of all the Bios screens but the main info was a packard bell user guide which came with my computer (complete with lots of coloured diagrams!) which explains how to do anything, with detailed system specs like:-

Supports 3.3v SDRAM DIMM.
Supports two memory banks using two 168-pin unbuffered DIMMs.
Supports up to 256MB of system memory (both PC100 or PC66 DIMM specifications can be used, but make sure to use 100 MHz DIMMs if your motherboard is equipped with a CPU with a 100MHz bus speed).
The motherboard automatically detects the speed, technology (parity), and size of the memory used
Memory upgrades
System memory holds information until the CPU accesses it or routes it to a device. The memory of the motherboard described in this chapter can be upgraded using DIMM modules. The Bora Pro motherboard has two DIMM sockets and can hold up to 256MBytes. Please use only the DIMM modules as described in the specifications. DIMM modules only fit in one way as they have two notch keys (A) on the connector. Push the module gently down in the slot, the slot side levers will automatically swing up to the vertical position. Memory is automatically detected, there is no need to change jumper settings after changing the memory configuration."

PB user guide is quite easy to follow, I've just recently installed a firewire card in an empty slot in the guts, ripped out the internal modem (I now have another hole to fill!) as am on ADSL, don't need the dial-up.
I did actually stumble across the crucial.com site and used it's memory script.
I will do as you suggest Gary, putting 128MB in the Dram bank 0, as I can't seem to find 64MB sticks. Thanks for the cleaning tips, in this dusty mining town it's probably gold dust anyway (and the inevitable dog hair)
--
* * Pebble in Boulder * *
who would never underestimate the humble floppy

"RJK" <notatospam@hotmail.com> wrote in message news:#1xvQ$psFHA.596@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> http://www.crucial.com has a great memory locator script / facility, if you
> can fill in the make and model of your PC or motherboard. It helps avoid
> single/double sided and other incompatibilities.
>
> regards, Richard
>
>
> "Gary S. Terhune" <grystnews@mvps.org> wrote in message
> news:o kA2JvnsFHA.4052@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> > Addendum: Make sure you blow out the slot that's remained empty all this
> > time. Check it closely for lint, dust, etc. Also pull the existing stick,
> > clean its contacts using a pencil eraser, then re-seat it.
> >
> > --
> > Gary S. Terhune
> > MS-MVP Shell/User
> >
> > "Gary S. Terhune" <grystnews@mvps.org> wrote in message
> > news:o ca2CsnsFHA.2064@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> >> There is no knowing what RAM is appropriate for your system without
> >> knowing the exact make/model of the motherboard (or of the computer in
> >> the case of its being a major brand name.) The *only* good RAM for that
> >> system is whatever is recommended for your system.
> >>
> >> In general, RAM likes to be matched. Even if you used Crucial.com, my
> >> favorite RAM supplier, the stick I get from them may not play well with
> >> what is already installed.
> >>
> >> My recommendations:
> >>
> >> You must have the right RAM for your system. If the vendor can't
> >> positively identify its RAM as being appropriate for your system (using a
> >> model by model database) then I would recommend against it. I would find
> >> the right RAM. I would *not* buy what your link suggests unless I knew
> >> how you decided that was the right stuff for you.
> >>
> >> I would look at the pricing involved when determining what to buy. If the
> >> 128 MB is substantially cheaper than 2 each of the 64 MB version, then I
> >> would recommend just getting the 128 MB stick and putting it into the
> >> first slot (DRAM Bank 0) by itself. Run it for a while that way, and if
> >> everything seems OK, put the old 64MB stick into the second slot (DRAM
> >> Bank 1). If it remains stable, fine, otherwise it's a write-off.
> >>
> >> You *can* get just one 64 MB and try adding it into the second slot, or
> >> even swap them. If it works, great. If not, you'll have to buy another
> >> 64MB stick and replace the old one. The gamble is that your least
> >> expensive option--one 64MB stick--will work. If not, you'll be paying for
> >> two 64MB sticks, instead of writing off your current RAM (unless it
> >> happens to work) and installing 128 MB immediately at, presumably, a cost
> >> much less than 2x64MB sticks.
> >>
> >> --
> >> Gary S. Terhune
> >> MS-MVP Shell/User
> >>
> >>
> >> "Pebble" <Pebble@boulder.rock.com> wrote in message
> >> news:u939pdnsFHA.3732@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
> >> Hi all,
> >> Have decided to load up some more memory into this old beast, after
> >> installing a firewire port to enable my Vidcam to download from the tape,
> >> not just the memory card - works fine, though slow, but that's OK. I've
> >> never got an out of memory error - yet!
> >> Bios tells me Dram bank 0 SDRAM Dram bank 1 NONE. I have 64MB of total
> >> memory.
> >> I don't want to overload the thing. Can I just chuck a module in the
> >> spare slot? Or should I take out the 64MB and insert a 256MB in same slot
> >> and leave the original empty slot empty. This is the product I was
> >> thinking of, as I can get it locally.
> >>
> >> http://www.dse.com.au/cgi-bin/dse.storefront/431cdc450a...
> >>
> >> After this, am having a go at a second hard drive - where does it all end
> >> ...............
> >>
> >> Thanks for any suggestions,
> >> --
> >> * * Pebble in Boulder * *
> >> who would never underestimate the humble floppy
> >> --
> >>
> >> Name: MULTIMEDIA 800AU*
> >> Microprocessor: Intel Pentium Ill 800MHz
> >> RAM: 64MB
> >> Video Memory: 8MB (VooDoo 3 2000)
> >> Hard Disk: 20GB
> >> Operating System: Windows '98 SE
> >> OE v 5.50.4807.1700
> >> IE v 5.50.4807.2300IC
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >
> >
>
>
Anonymous
a b } Memory
September 6, 2005 9:58:08 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

Well, all I can suggest, Pebble, is that you make sure you have a money-back
guarantee from the vendor in case the sticks don't work well in your system.
The specs you note below are quite general ones, and I'm guessing that most
of the sticks in this world that match those specs *won't* work well, that
there are more detailed specs that you aren't aware of that apply. I'd make
sure that this guarantee is in place, and I'd try to talk to someone at the
company, tell them what you have (the machine's specs) and see if they have
any reference guide that would suggest which RAM to use. Compare that with
what Crucial's RAM Selector says, too.

--
Gary S. Terhune
MS-MVP Shell/User

"Pebble" <Pebble@boulder.rock.com> wrote in message
news:elOwJlssFHA.304@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
Hi all and thanks for replies,
I came about the info for memory for my system from many sources - Everest
home edition, Belarc advisor, printout of all the Bios screens but the main
info was a packard bell user guide which came with my computer (complete
with lots of coloured diagrams!) which explains how to do anything, with
detailed system specs like:-

Supports 3.3v SDRAM DIMM.
Supports two memory banks using two 168-pin unbuffered DIMMs.
Supports up to 256MB of system memory (both PC100 or PC66 DIMM
specifications can be used, but make sure to use 100 MHz DIMMs if your
motherboard is equipped with a CPU with a 100MHz bus speed).
The motherboard automatically detects the speed, technology (parity), and
size of the memory used
Memory upgrades
System memory holds information until the CPU accesses it or routes it to a
device. The memory of the motherboard described in this chapter can be
upgraded using DIMM modules. The Bora Pro motherboard has two DIMM sockets
and can hold up to 256MBytes. Please use only the DIMM modules as described
in the specifications. DIMM modules only fit in one way as they have two
notch keys (A) on the connector. Push the module gently down in the slot,
the slot side levers will automatically swing up to the vertical position.
Memory is automatically detected, there is no need to change jumper settings
after changing the memory configuration."

PB user guide is quite easy to follow, I've just recently installed a
firewire card in an empty slot in the guts, ripped out the internal modem (I
now have another hole to fill!) as am on ADSL, don't need the dial-up.
I did actually stumble across the crucial.com site and used it's memory
script.
I will do as you suggest Gary, putting 128MB in the Dram bank 0, as I can't
seem to find 64MB sticks. Thanks for the cleaning tips, in this dusty
mining town it's probably gold dust anyway (and the inevitable dog hair)
--
* * Pebble in Boulder * *
who would never underestimate the humble floppy

"RJK" <notatospam@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:#1xvQ$psFHA.596@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> http://www.crucial.com has a great memory locator script / facility, if
> you
> can fill in the make and model of your PC or motherboard. It helps avoid
> single/double sided and other incompatibilities.
>
> regards, Richard
>
>
> "Gary S. Terhune" <grystnews@mvps.org> wrote in message
> news:o kA2JvnsFHA.4052@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> > Addendum: Make sure you blow out the slot that's remained empty all this
> > time. Check it closely for lint, dust, etc. Also pull the existing
> > stick,
> > clean its contacts using a pencil eraser, then re-seat it.
> >
> > --
> > Gary S. Terhune
> > MS-MVP Shell/User
> >
> > "Gary S. Terhune" <grystnews@mvps.org> wrote in message
> > news:o ca2CsnsFHA.2064@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> >> There is no knowing what RAM is appropriate for your system without
> >> knowing the exact make/model of the motherboard (or of the computer in
> >> the case of its being a major brand name.) The *only* good RAM for that
> >> system is whatever is recommended for your system.
> >>
> >> In general, RAM likes to be matched. Even if you used Crucial.com, my
> >> favorite RAM supplier, the stick I get from them may not play well with
> >> what is already installed.
> >>
> >> My recommendations:
> >>
> >> You must have the right RAM for your system. If the vendor can't
> >> positively identify its RAM as being appropriate for your system (using
> >> a
> >> model by model database) then I would recommend against it. I would
> >> find
> >> the right RAM. I would *not* buy what your link suggests unless I knew
> >> how you decided that was the right stuff for you.
> >>
> >> I would look at the pricing involved when determining what to buy. If
> >> the
> >> 128 MB is substantially cheaper than 2 each of the 64 MB version, then
> >> I
> >> would recommend just getting the 128 MB stick and putting it into the
> >> first slot (DRAM Bank 0) by itself. Run it for a while that way, and if
> >> everything seems OK, put the old 64MB stick into the second slot (DRAM
> >> Bank 1). If it remains stable, fine, otherwise it's a write-off.
> >>
> >> You *can* get just one 64 MB and try adding it into the second slot, or
> >> even swap them. If it works, great. If not, you'll have to buy another
> >> 64MB stick and replace the old one. The gamble is that your least
> >> expensive option--one 64MB stick--will work. If not, you'll be paying
> >> for
> >> two 64MB sticks, instead of writing off your current RAM (unless it
> >> happens to work) and installing 128 MB immediately at, presumably, a
> >> cost
> >> much less than 2x64MB sticks.
> >>
> >> --
> >> Gary S. Terhune
> >> MS-MVP Shell/User
> >>
> >>
> >> "Pebble" <Pebble@boulder.rock.com> wrote in message
> >> news:u939pdnsFHA.3732@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
> >> Hi all,
> >> Have decided to load up some more memory into this old beast, after
> >> installing a firewire port to enable my Vidcam to download from the
> >> tape,
> >> not just the memory card - works fine, though slow, but that's OK. I've
> >> never got an out of memory error - yet!
> >> Bios tells me Dram bank 0 SDRAM Dram bank 1 NONE. I have 64MB of total
> >> memory.
> >> I don't want to overload the thing. Can I just chuck a module in the
> >> spare slot? Or should I take out the 64MB and insert a 256MB in same
> >> slot
> >> and leave the original empty slot empty. This is the product I was
> >> thinking of, as I can get it locally.
> >>
> >> http://www.dse.com.au/cgi-bin/dse.storefront/431cdc450a...
> >>
> >> After this, am having a go at a second hard drive - where does it all
> >> end
> >> ...............
> >>
> >> Thanks for any suggestions,
> >> --
> >> * * Pebble in Boulder * *
> >> who would never underestimate the humble floppy
> >> --
> >>
> >> Name: MULTIMEDIA 800AU*
> >> Microprocessor: Intel Pentium Ill 800MHz
> >> RAM: 64MB
> >> Video Memory: 8MB (VooDoo 3 2000)
> >> Hard Disk: 20GB
> >> Operating System: Windows '98 SE
> >> OE v 5.50.4807.1700
> >> IE v 5.50.4807.2300IC
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >
> >
>
>
Anonymous
a b } Memory
September 6, 2005 10:00:49 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

LOL. There are decisions to make, first, jkb! These days especially one
MUST practice safe hex!


--
Thanks or Good Luck,
There may be humor in this post, and,
Naturally, you will not sue,
should things get worse after this,
PCR
pcrrcp@netzero.net
"jkb" <nospam> wrote in message
news:o qAHysnsFHA.3100@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
| Just stick new RAM in.
|
|
Anonymous
a b } Memory
September 7, 2005 11:19:32 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

EUREKA, It's in and recognised. Went for the 128MB and installed the other 32MB, don't see a whole lot of difference yet, but haven't done ay graphics work (and that's the main reason I increased it)
Do I have to configure anything to take full advantage of this larger memory?
--
* * Pebble in Boulder * *
who would never underestimate the humble floppy

"Gary S. Terhune" <grystnews@mvps.org> wrote in message news:o GTwRcvsFHA.2008@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> Well, all I can suggest, Pebble, is that you make sure you have a money-back
> guarantee from the vendor in case the sticks don't work well in your system.
> The specs you note below are quite general ones, and I'm guessing that most
> of the sticks in this world that match those specs *won't* work well, that
> there are more detailed specs that you aren't aware of that apply. I'd make
> sure that this guarantee is in place, and I'd try to talk to someone at the
> company, tell them what you have (the machine's specs) and see if they have
> any reference guide that would suggest which RAM to use. Compare that with
> what Crucial's RAM Selector says, too.
>
> --
> Gary S. Terhune
> MS-MVP Shell/User
>
> "Pebble" <Pebble@boulder.rock.com> wrote in message
> news:elOwJlssFHA.304@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
> Hi all and thanks for replies,
> I came about the info for memory for my system from many sources - Everest
> home edition, Belarc advisor, printout of all the Bios screens but the main
> info was a packard bell user guide which came with my computer (complete
> with lots of coloured diagrams!) which explains how to do anything, with
> detailed system specs like:-
>
> Supports 3.3v SDRAM DIMM.
> Supports two memory banks using two 168-pin unbuffered DIMMs.
> Supports up to 256MB of system memory (both PC100 or PC66 DIMM
> specifications can be used, but make sure to use 100 MHz DIMMs if your
> motherboard is equipped with a CPU with a 100MHz bus speed).
> The motherboard automatically detects the speed, technology (parity), and
> size of the memory used
> Memory upgrades
> System memory holds information until the CPU accesses it or routes it to a
> device. The memory of the motherboard described in this chapter can be
> upgraded using DIMM modules. The Bora Pro motherboard has two DIMM sockets
> and can hold up to 256MBytes. Please use only the DIMM modules as described
> in the specifications. DIMM modules only fit in one way as they have two
> notch keys (A) on the connector. Push the module gently down in the slot,
> the slot side levers will automatically swing up to the vertical position.
> Memory is automatically detected, there is no need to change jumper settings
> after changing the memory configuration."
>
> PB user guide is quite easy to follow, I've just recently installed a
> firewire card in an empty slot in the guts, ripped out the internal modem (I
> now have another hole to fill!) as am on ADSL, don't need the dial-up.
> I did actually stumble across the crucial.com site and used it's memory
> script.
> I will do as you suggest Gary, putting 128MB in the Dram bank 0, as I can't
> seem to find 64MB sticks. Thanks for the cleaning tips, in this dusty
> mining town it's probably gold dust anyway (and the inevitable dog hair)
> --
> * * Pebble in Boulder * *
> who would never underestimate the humble floppy
>
> "RJK" <notatospam@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:#1xvQ$psFHA.596@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> > http://www.crucial.com has a great memory locator script / facility, if
> > you
> > can fill in the make and model of your PC or motherboard. It helps avoid
> > single/double sided and other incompatibilities.
> >
> > regards, Richard
> >
> >
> > "Gary S. Terhune" <grystnews@mvps.org> wrote in message
> > news:o kA2JvnsFHA.4052@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> > > Addendum: Make sure you blow out the slot that's remained empty all this
> > > time. Check it closely for lint, dust, etc. Also pull the existing
> > > stick,
> > > clean its contacts using a pencil eraser, then re-seat it.
> > >
> > > --
> > > Gary S. Terhune
> > > MS-MVP Shell/User
> > >
> > > "Gary S. Terhune" <grystnews@mvps.org> wrote in message
> > > news:o ca2CsnsFHA.2064@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> > >> There is no knowing what RAM is appropriate for your system without
> > >> knowing the exact make/model of the motherboard (or of the computer in
> > >> the case of its being a major brand name.) The *only* good RAM for that
> > >> system is whatever is recommended for your system.
> > >>
> > >> In general, RAM likes to be matched. Even if you used Crucial.com, my
> > >> favorite RAM supplier, the stick I get from them may not play well with
> > >> what is already installed.
> > >>
> > >> My recommendations:
> > >>
> > >> You must have the right RAM for your system. If the vendor can't
> > >> positively identify its RAM as being appropriate for your system (using
> > >> a
> > >> model by model database) then I would recommend against it. I would
> > >> find
> > >> the right RAM. I would *not* buy what your link suggests unless I knew
> > >> how you decided that was the right stuff for you.
> > >>
> > >> I would look at the pricing involved when determining what to buy. If
> > >> the
> > >> 128 MB is substantially cheaper than 2 each of the 64 MB version, then
> > >> I
> > >> would recommend just getting the 128 MB stick and putting it into the
> > >> first slot (DRAM Bank 0) by itself. Run it for a while that way, and if
> > >> everything seems OK, put the old 64MB stick into the second slot (DRAM
> > >> Bank 1). If it remains stable, fine, otherwise it's a write-off.
> > >>
> > >> You *can* get just one 64 MB and try adding it into the second slot, or
> > >> even swap them. If it works, great. If not, you'll have to buy another
> > >> 64MB stick and replace the old one. The gamble is that your least
> > >> expensive option--one 64MB stick--will work. If not, you'll be paying
> > >> for
> > >> two 64MB sticks, instead of writing off your current RAM (unless it
> > >> happens to work) and installing 128 MB immediately at, presumably, a
> > >> cost
> > >> much less than 2x64MB sticks.
> > >>
> > >> --
> > >> Gary S. Terhune
> > >> MS-MVP Shell/User
> > >>
> > >>
> > >> "Pebble" <Pebble@boulder.rock.com> wrote in message
> > >> news:u939pdnsFHA.3732@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
> > >> Hi all,
> > >> Have decided to load up some more memory into this old beast, after
> > >> installing a firewire port to enable my Vidcam to download from the
> > >> tape,
> > >> not just the memory card - works fine, though slow, but that's OK. I've
> > >> never got an out of memory error - yet!
> > >> Bios tells me Dram bank 0 SDRAM Dram bank 1 NONE. I have 64MB of total
> > >> memory.
> > >> I don't want to overload the thing. Can I just chuck a module in the
> > >> spare slot? Or should I take out the 64MB and insert a 256MB in same
> > >> slot
> > >> and leave the original empty slot empty. This is the product I was
> > >> thinking of, as I can get it locally.
> > >>
> > >> http://www.dse.com.au/cgi-bin/dse.storefront/431cdc450a...
> > >>
> > >> After this, am having a go at a second hard drive - where does it all
> > >> end
> > >> ...............
> > >>
> > >> Thanks for any suggestions,
> > >> --
> > >> * * Pebble in Boulder * *
> > >> who would never underestimate the humble floppy
> > >> --
> > >>
> > >> Name: MULTIMEDIA 800AU*
> > >> Microprocessor: Intel Pentium Ill 800MHz
> > >> RAM: 64MB
> > >> Video Memory: 8MB (VooDoo 3 2000)
> > >> Hard Disk: 20GB
> > >> Operating System: Windows '98 SE
> > >> OE v 5.50.4807.1700
> > >> IE v 5.50.4807.2300IC
> > >>
> > >>
> > >>
> > >
> > >
> >
> >
>
>
Anonymous
a b } Memory
September 7, 2005 11:19:33 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

Nope, you should be fine. You only have to worry about RAM in excess of
512MB.

Glad to hear it's all working well. You might want to download and run a
floppy-based RAM tester on the RAM, just to make sure it's all good before
much time goes by and you lose any chance to exchange the RAM. Standard
Operating Procedure for new RAM.

One that I use is DocMemory from www.simmtester.com Unfortunately, their
download pages aren't working for me right now. Might try later.

--
Gary S. Terhune
MS-MVP Shell/User

"Pebble" <Pebble@boulder.rock.com> wrote in message
news:eqh5T35sFHA.1372@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
EUREKA, It's in and recognised. Went for the 128MB and installed the other
32MB, don't see a whole lot of difference yet, but haven't done ay graphics
work (and that's the main reason I increased it)
Do I have to configure anything to take full advantage of this larger
memory?
--
* * Pebble in Boulder * *
who would never underestimate the humble floppy

"Gary S. Terhune" <grystnews@mvps.org> wrote in message
news:o GTwRcvsFHA.2008@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> Well, all I can suggest, Pebble, is that you make sure you have a
> money-back
> guarantee from the vendor in case the sticks don't work well in your
> system.
> The specs you note below are quite general ones, and I'm guessing that
> most
> of the sticks in this world that match those specs *won't* work well, that
> there are more detailed specs that you aren't aware of that apply. I'd
> make
> sure that this guarantee is in place, and I'd try to talk to someone at
> the
> company, tell them what you have (the machine's specs) and see if they
> have
> any reference guide that would suggest which RAM to use. Compare that with
> what Crucial's RAM Selector says, too.
>
> --
> Gary S. Terhune
> MS-MVP Shell/User
>
> "Pebble" <Pebble@boulder.rock.com> wrote in message
> news:elOwJlssFHA.304@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
> Hi all and thanks for replies,
> I came about the info for memory for my system from many sources - Everest
> home edition, Belarc advisor, printout of all the Bios screens but the
> main
> info was a packard bell user guide which came with my computer (complete
> with lots of coloured diagrams!) which explains how to do anything, with
> detailed system specs like:-
>
> Supports 3.3v SDRAM DIMM.
> Supports two memory banks using two 168-pin unbuffered DIMMs.
> Supports up to 256MB of system memory (both PC100 or PC66 DIMM
> specifications can be used, but make sure to use 100 MHz DIMMs if your
> motherboard is equipped with a CPU with a 100MHz bus speed).
> The motherboard automatically detects the speed, technology (parity), and
> size of the memory used
> Memory upgrades
> System memory holds information until the CPU accesses it or routes it to
> a
> device. The memory of the motherboard described in this chapter can be
> upgraded using DIMM modules. The Bora Pro motherboard has two DIMM sockets
> and can hold up to 256MBytes. Please use only the DIMM modules as
> described
> in the specifications. DIMM modules only fit in one way as they have two
> notch keys (A) on the connector. Push the module gently down in the slot,
> the slot side levers will automatically swing up to the vertical position.
> Memory is automatically detected, there is no need to change jumper
> settings
> after changing the memory configuration."
>
> PB user guide is quite easy to follow, I've just recently installed a
> firewire card in an empty slot in the guts, ripped out the internal modem
> (I
> now have another hole to fill!) as am on ADSL, don't need the dial-up.
> I did actually stumble across the crucial.com site and used it's memory
> script.
> I will do as you suggest Gary, putting 128MB in the Dram bank 0, as I
> can't
> seem to find 64MB sticks. Thanks for the cleaning tips, in this dusty
> mining town it's probably gold dust anyway (and the inevitable dog hair)
> --
> * * Pebble in Boulder * *
> who would never underestimate the humble floppy
>
> "RJK" <notatospam@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:#1xvQ$psFHA.596@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> > http://www.crucial.com has a great memory locator script / facility, if
> > you
> > can fill in the make and model of your PC or motherboard. It helps
> > avoid
> > single/double sided and other incompatibilities.
> >
> > regards, Richard
> >
> >
> > "Gary S. Terhune" <grystnews@mvps.org> wrote in message
> > news:o kA2JvnsFHA.4052@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> > > Addendum: Make sure you blow out the slot that's remained empty all
> > > this
> > > time. Check it closely for lint, dust, etc. Also pull the existing
> > > stick,
> > > clean its contacts using a pencil eraser, then re-seat it.
> > >
> > > --
> > > Gary S. Terhune
> > > MS-MVP Shell/User
> > >
> > > "Gary S. Terhune" <grystnews@mvps.org> wrote in message
> > > news:o ca2CsnsFHA.2064@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> > >> There is no knowing what RAM is appropriate for your system without
> > >> knowing the exact make/model of the motherboard (or of the computer
> > >> in
> > >> the case of its being a major brand name.) The *only* good RAM for
> > >> that
> > >> system is whatever is recommended for your system.
> > >>
> > >> In general, RAM likes to be matched. Even if you used Crucial.com, my
> > >> favorite RAM supplier, the stick I get from them may not play well
> > >> with
> > >> what is already installed.
> > >>
> > >> My recommendations:
> > >>
> > >> You must have the right RAM for your system. If the vendor can't
> > >> positively identify its RAM as being appropriate for your system
> > >> (using
> > >> a
> > >> model by model database) then I would recommend against it. I would
> > >> find
> > >> the right RAM. I would *not* buy what your link suggests unless I
> > >> knew
> > >> how you decided that was the right stuff for you.
> > >>
> > >> I would look at the pricing involved when determining what to buy. If
> > >> the
> > >> 128 MB is substantially cheaper than 2 each of the 64 MB version,
> > >> then
> > >> I
> > >> would recommend just getting the 128 MB stick and putting it into the
> > >> first slot (DRAM Bank 0) by itself. Run it for a while that way, and
> > >> if
> > >> everything seems OK, put the old 64MB stick into the second slot
> > >> (DRAM
> > >> Bank 1). If it remains stable, fine, otherwise it's a write-off.
> > >>
> > >> You *can* get just one 64 MB and try adding it into the second slot,
> > >> or
> > >> even swap them. If it works, great. If not, you'll have to buy
> > >> another
> > >> 64MB stick and replace the old one. The gamble is that your least
> > >> expensive option--one 64MB stick--will work. If not, you'll be paying
> > >> for
> > >> two 64MB sticks, instead of writing off your current RAM (unless it
> > >> happens to work) and installing 128 MB immediately at, presumably, a
> > >> cost
> > >> much less than 2x64MB sticks.
> > >>
> > >> --
> > >> Gary S. Terhune
> > >> MS-MVP Shell/User
> > >>
> > >>
> > >> "Pebble" <Pebble@boulder.rock.com> wrote in message
> > >> news:u939pdnsFHA.3732@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
> > >> Hi all,
> > >> Have decided to load up some more memory into this old beast, after
> > >> installing a firewire port to enable my Vidcam to download from the
> > >> tape,
> > >> not just the memory card - works fine, though slow, but that's OK.
> > >> I've
> > >> never got an out of memory error - yet!
> > >> Bios tells me Dram bank 0 SDRAM Dram bank 1 NONE. I have 64MB of
> > >> total
> > >> memory.
> > >> I don't want to overload the thing. Can I just chuck a module in the
> > >> spare slot? Or should I take out the 64MB and insert a 256MB in same
> > >> slot
> > >> and leave the original empty slot empty. This is the product I was
> > >> thinking of, as I can get it locally.
> > >>
> > >> http://www.dse.com.au/cgi-bin/dse.storefront/431cdc450a...
> > >>
> > >> After this, am having a go at a second hard drive - where does it all
> > >> end
> > >> ...............
> > >>
> > >> Thanks for any suggestions,
> > >> --
> > >> * * Pebble in Boulder * *
> > >> who would never underestimate the humble floppy
> > >> --
> > >>
> > >> Name: MULTIMEDIA 800AU*
> > >> Microprocessor: Intel Pentium Ill 800MHz
> > >> RAM: 64MB
> > >> Video Memory: 8MB (VooDoo 3 2000)
> > >> Hard Disk: 20GB
> > >> Operating System: Windows '98 SE
> > >> OE v 5.50.4807.1700
> > >> IE v 5.50.4807.2300IC
> > >>
> > >>
> > >>
> > >
> > >
> >
> >
>
>
Anonymous
a b } Memory
September 10, 2005 2:43:05 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

Thanks Gary,
Will look into that memory tester.
--
* * Pebble in Boulder * *
who would never underestimate the humble floppy
"Gary S. Terhune" <grystnews@mvps.org> wrote in message news:o bGU5L9sFHA.2860@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> Nope, you should be fine. You only have to worry about RAM in excess of
> 512MB.
>
> Glad to hear it's all working well. You might want to download and run a
> floppy-based RAM tester on the RAM, just to make sure it's all good before
> much time goes by and you lose any chance to exchange the RAM. Standard
> Operating Procedure for new RAM.
>
> One that I use is DocMemory from www.simmtester.com Unfortunately, their
> download pages aren't working for me right now. Might try later.
>
> --
> Gary S. Terhune
> MS-MVP Shell/User
>
> "Pebble" <Pebble@boulder.rock.com> wrote in message
> news:eqh5T35sFHA.1372@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> EUREKA, It's in and recognised. Went for the 128MB and installed the other
> 32MB, don't see a whole lot of difference yet, but haven't done ay graphics
> work (and that's the main reason I increased it)
> Do I have to configure anything to take full advantage of this larger
> memory?
> --
> * * Pebble in Boulder * *
> who would never underestimate the humble floppy
>
> "Gary S. Terhune" <grystnews@mvps.org> wrote in message
> news:o GTwRcvsFHA.2008@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> > Well, all I can suggest, Pebble, is that you make sure you have a
> > money-back
> > guarantee from the vendor in case the sticks don't work well in your
> > system.
> > The specs you note below are quite general ones, and I'm guessing that
> > most
> > of the sticks in this world that match those specs *won't* work well, that
> > there are more detailed specs that you aren't aware of that apply. I'd
> > make
> > sure that this guarantee is in place, and I'd try to talk to someone at
> > the
> > company, tell them what you have (the machine's specs) and see if they
> > have
> > any reference guide that would suggest which RAM to use. Compare that with
> > what Crucial's RAM Selector says, too.
> >
> > --
> > Gary S. Terhune
> > MS-MVP Shell/User
> >
> > "Pebble" <Pebble@boulder.rock.com> wrote in message
> > news:elOwJlssFHA.304@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
> > Hi all and thanks for replies,
> > I came about the info for memory for my system from many sources - Everest
> > home edition, Belarc advisor, printout of all the Bios screens but the
> > main
> > info was a packard bell user guide which came with my computer (complete
> > with lots of coloured diagrams!) which explains how to do anything, with
> > detailed system specs like:-
> >
> > Supports 3.3v SDRAM DIMM.
> > Supports two memory banks using two 168-pin unbuffered DIMMs.
> > Supports up to 256MB of system memory (both PC100 or PC66 DIMM
> > specifications can be used, but make sure to use 100 MHz DIMMs if your
> > motherboard is equipped with a CPU with a 100MHz bus speed).
> > The motherboard automatically detects the speed, technology (parity), and
> > size of the memory used
> > Memory upgrades
> > System memory holds information until the CPU accesses it or routes it to
> > a
> > device. The memory of the motherboard described in this chapter can be
> > upgraded using DIMM modules. The Bora Pro motherboard has two DIMM sockets
> > and can hold up to 256MBytes. Please use only the DIMM modules as
> > described
> > in the specifications. DIMM modules only fit in one way as they have two
> > notch keys (A) on the connector. Push the module gently down in the slot,
> > the slot side levers will automatically swing up to the vertical position.
> > Memory is automatically detected, there is no need to change jumper
> > settings
> > after changing the memory configuration."
> >
> > PB user guide is quite easy to follow, I've just recently installed a
> > firewire card in an empty slot in the guts, ripped out the internal modem
> > (I
> > now have another hole to fill!) as am on ADSL, don't need the dial-up.
> > I did actually stumble across the crucial.com site and used it's memory
> > script.
> > I will do as you suggest Gary, putting 128MB in the Dram bank 0, as I
> > can't
> > seem to find 64MB sticks. Thanks for the cleaning tips, in this dusty
> > mining town it's probably gold dust anyway (and the inevitable dog hair)
> > --
> > * * Pebble in Boulder * *
> > who would never underestimate the humble floppy
> >
> > "RJK" <notatospam@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> > news:#1xvQ$psFHA.596@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> > > http://www.crucial.com has a great memory locator script / facility, if
> > > you
> > > can fill in the make and model of your PC or motherboard. It helps
> > > avoid
> > > single/double sided and other incompatibilities.
> > >
> > > regards, Richard
> > >
> > >
> > > "Gary S. Terhune" <grystnews@mvps.org> wrote in message
> > > news:o kA2JvnsFHA.4052@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> > > > Addendum: Make sure you blow out the slot that's remained empty all
> > > > this
> > > > time. Check it closely for lint, dust, etc. Also pull the existing
> > > > stick,
> > > > clean its contacts using a pencil eraser, then re-seat it.
> > > >
> > > > --
> > > > Gary S. Terhune
> > > > MS-MVP Shell/User
> > > >
> > > > "Gary S. Terhune" <grystnews@mvps.org> wrote in message
> > > > news:o ca2CsnsFHA.2064@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> > > >> There is no knowing what RAM is appropriate for your system without
> > > >> knowing the exact make/model of the motherboard (or of the computer
> > > >> in
> > > >> the case of its being a major brand name.) The *only* good RAM for
> > > >> that
> > > >> system is whatever is recommended for your system.
> > > >>
> > > >> In general, RAM likes to be matched. Even if you used Crucial.com, my
> > > >> favorite RAM supplier, the stick I get from them may not play well
> > > >> with
> > > >> what is already installed.
> > > >>
> > > >> My recommendations:
> > > >>
> > > >> You must have the right RAM for your system. If the vendor can't
> > > >> positively identify its RAM as being appropriate for your system
> > > >> (using
> > > >> a
> > > >> model by model database) then I would recommend against it. I would
> > > >> find
> > > >> the right RAM. I would *not* buy what your link suggests unless I
> > > >> knew
> > > >> how you decided that was the right stuff for you.
> > > >>
> > > >> I would look at the pricing involved when determining what to buy. If
> > > >> the
> > > >> 128 MB is substantially cheaper than 2 each of the 64 MB version,
> > > >> then
> > > >> I
> > > >> would recommend just getting the 128 MB stick and putting it into the
> > > >> first slot (DRAM Bank 0) by itself. Run it for a while that way, and
> > > >> if
> > > >> everything seems OK, put the old 64MB stick into the second slot
> > > >> (DRAM
> > > >> Bank 1). If it remains stable, fine, otherwise it's a write-off.
> > > >>
> > > >> You *can* get just one 64 MB and try adding it into the second slot,
> > > >> or
> > > >> even swap them. If it works, great. If not, you'll have to buy
> > > >> another
> > > >> 64MB stick and replace the old one. The gamble is that your least
> > > >> expensive option--one 64MB stick--will work. If not, you'll be paying
> > > >> for
> > > >> two 64MB sticks, instead of writing off your current RAM (unless it
> > > >> happens to work) and installing 128 MB immediately at, presumably, a
> > > >> cost
> > > >> much less than 2x64MB sticks.
> > > >>
> > > >> --
> > > >> Gary S. Terhune
> > > >> MS-MVP Shell/User
> > > >>
> > > >>
> > > >> "Pebble" <Pebble@boulder.rock.com> wrote in message
> > > >> news:u939pdnsFHA.3732@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
> > > >> Hi all,
> > > >> Have decided to load up some more memory into this old beast, after
> > > >> installing a firewire port to enable my Vidcam to download from the
> > > >> tape,
> > > >> not just the memory card - works fine, though slow, but that's OK.
> > > >> I've
> > > >> never got an out of memory error - yet!
> > > >> Bios tells me Dram bank 0 SDRAM Dram bank 1 NONE. I have 64MB of
> > > >> total
> > > >> memory.
> > > >> I don't want to overload the thing. Can I just chuck a module in the
> > > >> spare slot? Or should I take out the 64MB and insert a 256MB in same
> > > >> slot
> > > >> and leave the original empty slot empty. This is the product I was
> > > >> thinking of, as I can get it locally.
> > > >>
> > > >> http://www.dse.com.au/cgi-bin/dse.storefront/431cdc450a...
> > > >>
> > > >> After this, am having a go at a second hard drive - where does it all
> > > >> end
> > > >> ...............
> > > >>
> > > >> Thanks for any suggestions,
> > > >> --
> > > >> * * Pebble in Boulder * *
> > > >> who would never underestimate the humble floppy
> > > >> --
> > > >>
> > > >> Name: MULTIMEDIA 800AU*
> > > >> Microprocessor: Intel Pentium Ill 800MHz
> > > >> RAM: 64MB
> > > >> Video Memory: 8MB (VooDoo 3 2000)
> > > >> Hard Disk: 20GB
> > > >> Operating System: Windows '98 SE
> > > >> OE v 5.50.4807.1700
> > > >> IE v 5.50.4807.2300IC
> > > >>
> > > >>
> > > >>
> > > >
> > > >
> > >
> > >
> >
> >
>
>
!