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msgsrv32 issue

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Last response: in Windows 95/98/ME
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September 7, 2005 2:29:04 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

My pc with win98se will not boot up. It gets to the point when the desktop
should start to load when a GPF shows up with msgsrv32 as the error. But the
pc is locked up so badly that I can't click the 'details' button to find out
which module has the problem.

I had overclocked the CPU over the weekend, but have since turned it back to
default speed. I also returned the entire BIOS back to default settings.
That's the only recent change I'm aware of.

I do not have the installation disk, but I do have a windows 98 first
edition cd available, if I need to reload a similar file.

Thanks in advance!

More about : msgsrv32 issue

Anonymous
September 7, 2005 7:59:18 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

"It gets to the point when the desktop should start to load when a GPF
shows up with msgsrv32 as the error. But the pc is locked up so badly
that I can't click the 'details' button to find out which module has
the problem."

The fact that MsgSrv32 is involved tells you almost nothing because
MsgSrv32 is only the program that reports trouble to the video screen.
What the message does tell you is that the trouble is serious enough
that the computer locked up while MsgSrv32 was still running. This is
frequently a sign of hardware trouble.

"I had overclocked the CPU over the weekend, but have since turned it
back to default speed. I also returned the entire BIOS back to
default settings."

Sigh! So hardware trouble is even more likely.

Troubleshooting should follow this logic:

1. Start Win95/98 in Safe Mode.
If the trouble does not appear in Safe Mode, then the trouble is
caused by software conflicts or defects. Investigate each of the
functions that Safe Mode turns off.

2. If the trouble also occurs in Safe Mode, rename the current Windows
folder and reinstall Win95/98 into an empty folder.
If the trouble does not appear with a fresh installation, the trouble
is caused by something you have added to Win95/98 (but something that
is not turned off by Safe Mode).

3. If the trouble occurs even with a fresh install of Windows, the
trouble is arising in hardware.

Safe Mode does the following:
(a) bypasses config.sys and autoexec.bat
(b) prevents programs from starting automatically (from win.ini
or the startup folder)
(c) uses standard VGA video
(d) prevents a network from being started
(e) disables protected mode device drivers (those listed in
Device Manager)
(f) bypasses the [boot] and [386Enh] sections of system.ini
For more details, see document 122051 in the Microsoft KnowledgeBase.

If Safe Mode makes the problem go away, you can try tests from the
list below to pin down the cause of the problem. For more elaborate
instructions, see document 156126 in the KnowledgeBase, which explains
how to do troubleshooting in Safe Mode.

With Windows 98, you can use MSConfig to help you run the tests below.
With Windows 95, you can use Startup Control Panel. Startup Control
Panel is similar to the Msconfig utility that ships in Windows 98. It
can make troubleshooting easier by removing and restoring items from
the Windows startup. You can get Startup Control Panel as freeware
from:

http://home.ptd.net/~don5408/toolbox/startupcpl/

Startup Cop can also disable items loading at Windows startup and it
is freeware. You can download Startup Cop from:

http://www.zdnet.com/downloads/stories/info/0,,77594,.h...

Yet another option is msconfig.exe as adapted to Win95:

http://www2.whidbey.net/djdenham/Msconfig.htm

1. Change the video driver to Microsoft's Standard Display Adapter
(VGA). Restart Windows and test.

2. Rename the Config.sys and Autoexec.bat to Config.sss and
Autoexec.bbb, or edit them so that the only things loading are
absolutely necessary for the computer to run. The latter items might
be a SCSI driver for the harddrive, or disk management software for an
EIDE drive. Deactivate EVERYTHING else by putting REM in front of
that line. Reboot the computer and test.

3. Remove EVERYTHING from the Start Menu/Startup folder by dragging
their icons onto the desktop. Also disable or uninstall all utilities
that are running TSR (such as Norton Navigator, SoftRam or Macafee
AV). Restart Windows and test.

4. Rename the Win.ini and System.ini to Win.iii and System.iii. Then
make a copy of System.cb and name it System.ini. Do not rename
System.cb itself. Edit the new System.ini as follows: Add
device=*vmd
to the [386Enh] section, and add
drivers=mmsystem.dll
mouse.drv=mouse.drv
to the [boot] section. Restart Windows. You probably will have no
mouse so you'll have to use keystrokes to do the following. Go into
Device Manager and select the mouse (which will have a yellow
exclamation point). Click "Remove." Again, restart Windows. Windows
should find the mouse and install software for it. Test.

5. With Windows 98, run the System File Checker. Go to Start/Run and
enter "sfc".

6. Rename the current Windows folder (directory). Then install
Win95/98 to a new, empty folder. Test. If problem does not occur, it
was caused by something in the old installation. I recommend that you
keep this new installation and reinstall your Windows applications.

When you reinstall applications, install Windows applications that
were written for Win95/98 or WinNT but do not install older
applications that were written for Windows 3.x. Install only one
application at a time and test the system thoroughly before installing
another application. Before you install and application, make a system
snapshot with a program such as ConfigSafe; this will allow you to
revert to the previous situation if (when) you install an application
that causes trouble. With Win98, it is also possible to run "ScanReg
/Backup" before you install an application, which allows you to
restore the Registry if (when) you install an application that causes
trouble. However, it is safer to make a complete system backup and
recovery with ConfigSafe or a similar product.

The following articles explain how to install into a new folder:

How to Reinstall Windows 95 to a New Folder [142096]
http://support.microsoft.com/support/kb/articles/142/0/...

How to Install Windows 98 to a New Folder [193902]
http://support.microsoft.com/support/kb/articles/193/9/...

Information about reinstalling is also on www.windowsreinstall.com.

Bill Starbuck (MVP)
September 7, 2005 9:02:04 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

"Bill Starbuck" wrote:

> "It gets to the point when the desktop should start to load when a GPF
> shows up with msgsrv32 as the error. But the pc is locked up so badly
> that I can't click the 'details' button to find out which module has
> the problem."
>
> The fact that MsgSrv32 is involved tells you almost nothing because
> MsgSrv32 is only the program that reports trouble to the video screen.
> What the message does tell you is that the trouble is serious enough
> that the computer locked up while MsgSrv32 was still running. This is
> frequently a sign of hardware trouble.
>
> "I had overclocked the CPU over the weekend, but have since turned it
> back to default speed. I also returned the entire BIOS back to
> default settings."
>
> Sigh! So hardware trouble is even more likely.
>

I am unable to reboot into Safe Mode at all. The PC boots to same point,
then the msgsrv32 error occurs.

What hardware piece would be most likely to have failed? CPU, since I
overclocked it? I overclocked it only one step. Just to see if I could
squeeze a touch more speed out of it. But, it looks like even that was too
far.

Thanks in advance!
Related resources
September 8, 2005 5:49:01 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

Well, I've installed Win98 into a new folder, and everything boots up, but it
is unable to open IE or even Outlook Express. I've reinstalled most of the
hardware, just enough to try and get it on the 'net, but no success so far.

Still likely a hardware issue?

"Bill Starbuck" wrote:

> "It gets to the point when the desktop should start to load when a GPF
> shows up with msgsrv32 as the error. But the pc is locked up so badly
> that I can't click the 'details' button to find out which module has
> the problem."
>
> The fact that MsgSrv32 is involved tells you almost nothing because
> MsgSrv32 is only the program that reports trouble to the video screen.
> What the message does tell you is that the trouble is serious enough
> that the computer locked up while MsgSrv32 was still running. This is
> frequently a sign of hardware trouble.
>
> "I had overclocked the CPU over the weekend, but have since turned it
> back to default speed. I also returned the entire BIOS back to
> default settings."
>
> Sigh! So hardware trouble is even more likely.
>
> Troubleshooting should follow this logic:
>
> 1. Start Win95/98 in Safe Mode.
> If the trouble does not appear in Safe Mode, then the trouble is
> caused by software conflicts or defects. Investigate each of the
> functions that Safe Mode turns off.
>
> 2. If the trouble also occurs in Safe Mode, rename the current Windows
> folder and reinstall Win95/98 into an empty folder.
> If the trouble does not appear with a fresh installation, the trouble
> is caused by something you have added to Win95/98 (but something that
> is not turned off by Safe Mode).
>
> 3. If the trouble occurs even with a fresh install of Windows, the
> trouble is arising in hardware.
>
> Safe Mode does the following:
> (a) bypasses config.sys and autoexec.bat
> (b) prevents programs from starting automatically (from win.ini
> or the startup folder)
> (c) uses standard VGA video
> (d) prevents a network from being started
> (e) disables protected mode device drivers (those listed in
> Device Manager)
> (f) bypasses the [boot] and [386Enh] sections of system.ini
> For more details, see document 122051 in the Microsoft KnowledgeBase.
>
> If Safe Mode makes the problem go away, you can try tests from the
> list below to pin down the cause of the problem. For more elaborate
> instructions, see document 156126 in the KnowledgeBase, which explains
> how to do troubleshooting in Safe Mode.
>
> With Windows 98, you can use MSConfig to help you run the tests below.
> With Windows 95, you can use Startup Control Panel. Startup Control
> Panel is similar to the Msconfig utility that ships in Windows 98. It
> can make troubleshooting easier by removing and restoring items from
> the Windows startup. You can get Startup Control Panel as freeware
> from:
>
> http://home.ptd.net/~don5408/toolbox/startupcpl/
>
> Startup Cop can also disable items loading at Windows startup and it
> is freeware. You can download Startup Cop from:
>
> http://www.zdnet.com/downloads/stories/info/0,,77594,.h...
>
> Yet another option is msconfig.exe as adapted to Win95:
>
> http://www2.whidbey.net/djdenham/Msconfig.htm
>
> 1. Change the video driver to Microsoft's Standard Display Adapter
> (VGA). Restart Windows and test.
>
> 2. Rename the Config.sys and Autoexec.bat to Config.sss and
> Autoexec.bbb, or edit them so that the only things loading are
> absolutely necessary for the computer to run. The latter items might
> be a SCSI driver for the harddrive, or disk management software for an
> EIDE drive. Deactivate EVERYTHING else by putting REM in front of
> that line. Reboot the computer and test.
>
> 3. Remove EVERYTHING from the Start Menu/Startup folder by dragging
> their icons onto the desktop. Also disable or uninstall all utilities
> that are running TSR (such as Norton Navigator, SoftRam or Macafee
> AV). Restart Windows and test.
>
> 4. Rename the Win.ini and System.ini to Win.iii and System.iii. Then
> make a copy of System.cb and name it System.ini. Do not rename
> System.cb itself. Edit the new System.ini as follows: Add
> device=*vmd
> to the [386Enh] section, and add
> drivers=mmsystem.dll
> mouse.drv=mouse.drv
> to the [boot] section. Restart Windows. You probably will have no
> mouse so you'll have to use keystrokes to do the following. Go into
> Device Manager and select the mouse (which will have a yellow
> exclamation point). Click "Remove." Again, restart Windows. Windows
> should find the mouse and install software for it. Test.
>
> 5. With Windows 98, run the System File Checker. Go to Start/Run and
> enter "sfc".
>
> 6. Rename the current Windows folder (directory). Then install
> Win95/98 to a new, empty folder. Test. If problem does not occur, it
> was caused by something in the old installation. I recommend that you
> keep this new installation and reinstall your Windows applications.
>
> When you reinstall applications, install Windows applications that
> were written for Win95/98 or WinNT but do not install older
> applications that were written for Windows 3.x. Install only one
> application at a time and test the system thoroughly before installing
> another application. Before you install and application, make a system
> snapshot with a program such as ConfigSafe; this will allow you to
> revert to the previous situation if (when) you install an application
> that causes trouble. With Win98, it is also possible to run "ScanReg
> /Backup" before you install an application, which allows you to
> restore the Registry if (when) you install an application that causes
> trouble. However, it is safer to make a complete system backup and
> recovery with ConfigSafe or a similar product.
>
> The following articles explain how to install into a new folder:
>
> How to Reinstall Windows 95 to a New Folder [142096]
> http://support.microsoft.com/support/kb/articles/142/0/...
>
> How to Install Windows 98 to a New Folder [193902]
> http://support.microsoft.com/support/kb/articles/193/9/...
>
> Information about reinstalling is also on www.windowsreinstall.com.
>
> Bill Starbuck (MVP)
>
Anonymous
September 9, 2005 10:54:31 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

"Well, I've installed Win98 into a new folder, and everything boots
up, but it is unable to open IE or even Outlook Express."

My initial though would be that when you reinstalled Windows, this
process should have also installed the old version of IE that was
current in 1998, which I think was version 4. That older version
should work with hardware that existed at that time. Have you
subsequently installed newer hardware that might call for updated
drivers?

You can try going to Control Panel's Add/Remove module and using it to
reinstall IE. I ecall that rhere were problems when people tried to
reinstall Windows after they had undated IE and the newer IE didn't
work with the older Windows (presumably because the reinstalled older
Windows lacked some of the needed newer components). See this document
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;222564

Also, make sure that you followed the instructions in this document
when you reinstalled Windows:
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;193902

You might also find it useful to post a question in one of the IE
groups.

Bill Starbuck (MVP)
September 9, 2005 4:16:29 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

Well, to polish this thing off, I reformatted and did a clean install of
Win98. Installed and updated drivers, programs, and security updates, and so
far, the PC is running smooth. Guess that'll teach me to mess with
overclocking CPU's.

Thanks for all the help Bill! I really appreciate it!

"Bill Starbuck" wrote:

> "Well, I've installed Win98 into a new folder, and everything boots
> up, but it is unable to open IE or even Outlook Express."
>
> My initial though would be that when you reinstalled Windows, this
> process should have also installed the old version of IE that was
> current in 1998, which I think was version 4. That older version
> should work with hardware that existed at that time. Have you
> subsequently installed newer hardware that might call for updated
> drivers?
>
> You can try going to Control Panel's Add/Remove module and using it to
> reinstall IE. I ecall that rhere were problems when people tried to
> reinstall Windows after they had undated IE and the newer IE didn't
> work with the older Windows (presumably because the reinstalled older
> Windows lacked some of the needed newer components). See this document
> http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;222564
>
> Also, make sure that you followed the instructions in this document
> when you reinstalled Windows:
> http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;193902
>
> You might also find it useful to post a question in one of the IE
> groups.
>
> Bill Starbuck (MVP)
>
Anonymous
September 10, 2005 10:07:47 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

It is great to hear that you have a working computer again.

Bill Starbuck (MVP)
!