Fresh install on "D" drive

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

I have a spare computer which I use for backup and to allow the
grandkids to play games and surf when visiting. It has a 3gb and 6gb
hard drive. The 3 gb "C" has w98se installed and the 6gb "D" has
nothing but some data. I want to do a fresh install of w98se on the
6gb drive and use it as the primary and the smaller drive as the
overflow for data when needed.

What is easiest way to do this?

IE: can I simply change the drives in the bios and then boot my W98se
disc and reinstall?
7 answers Last reply
More about fresh install drive
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

    Only if the partition on the larger drive is a Primary Partition. It probably is, but it may also be an Extended Partition with one or more Volumes.

    Question 1: Why are you installing a fresh copy? Many of the reasons people want to install fresh often derive from malware infestations (virus, spyware, etc.), and leaving the old system visible to the new one might very well reinfect the new system. Furthermore, if you want to make sure your new system is off to a good start, you want to either be *certain* it's a clean disk or you want to nuke it, wipe all data, rewrite the entire file structure, etc.

    Question 2: What make/model machine and what flavor of installation media do you have? Retail CD, OEM CD, proprietary "Restore" CD?

    --
    Gary S. Terhune
    MS-MVP Shell/User


    "GTT" <gttmailremovenospam@gmail.com> wrote in message news:jlfei1p0lt49kcrp4qnrqlqo91tu90293o@4ax.com...
    >I have a spare computer which I use for backup and to allow the
    > grandkids to play games and surf when visiting. It has a 3gb and 6gb
    > hard drive. The 3 gb "C" has w98se installed and the 6gb "D" has
    > nothing but some data. I want to do a fresh install of w98se on the
    > 6gb drive and use it as the primary and the smaller drive as the
    > overflow for data when needed.
    >
    > What is easiest way to do this?
    >
    > IE: can I simply change the drives in the bios and then boot my W98se
    > disc and reinstall?
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

    My suggestion (not the easiest but the way I would do it).

    1. Make a boot disk with CDROM support from the present win98SE
    installation.
    2. Make sure you have the product key for the CDROM. It is easy to get from
    the existing installation before you do anything
    3. Save any files you have on the D: drive that you want to save onto the C
    drive prior to proceeding.
    4. I would open the case and change the drive connections and jumpers to
    make the the existing D drive the new C drive and vice versa. (Reason - If
    you install windows on the D drive you need both the C and D drive
    operational to boot windows since some of the windows boot files will be on
    the c drive)

    5. Boot the floppy (the disk you made above). Note the drive letter for the
    CDROM drive during boot up (I'm assuming F: below if not replace F with the
    proper drive letter). Check to see that the C drive now is the the one
    which used to be the D drive. You can type chkdsk at the A;> prompt. (It
    will tell you the size)
    6. Type format C: When complete insert the CDROM in the CDROM drive
    7. At the A:> prompt type the following F:\win98\setup.
    8 Setup will start. Then following the instructions.
    9. Once you have completed setup and booted to windows and installed any
    necessary drivers and everything seems to work properly, your ready to deal
    with the old C: drive which now should be D:. (You would want to save any
    data you may have their and you may want to clean it up (format it))

    --
    Jon Hildrum
    DTS MVP
    Jon_Hildrum@msn.com
    www.hildrum.com
    "GTT" <gttmailremovenospam@gmail.com> wrote in message
    news:jlfei1p0lt49kcrp4qnrqlqo91tu90293o@4ax.com...
    >I have a spare computer which I use for backup and to allow the
    > grandkids to play games and surf when visiting. It has a 3gb and 6gb
    > hard drive. The 3 gb "C" has w98se installed and the 6gb "D" has
    > nothing but some data. I want to do a fresh install of w98se on the
    > 6gb drive and use it as the primary and the smaller drive as the
    > overflow for data when needed.
    >
    > What is easiest way to do this?
    >
    > IE: can I simply change the drives in the bios and then boot my W98se
    > disc and reinstall?
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

    Gary I just want a nice clean install with virtually nothing on it, no
    problems such as spyware, etc. It is older pentium and I have the
    retail win 98se cd

    On Tue, 13 Sep 2005 14:25:46 -0700, "Gary S. Terhune"
    <grystnews@mvps.org> wrote:

    >Only if the partition on the larger drive is a Primary Partition. It probably is, but it may also be an Extended Partition with one or more Volumes.
    >
    >Question 1: Why are you installing a fresh copy? Many of the reasons people want to install fresh often derive from malware infestations (virus, spyware, etc.), and leaving the old system visible to the new one might very well reinfect the new system. Furthermore, if you want to make sure your new system is off to a good start, you want to either be *certain* it's a clean disk or you want to nuke it, wipe all data, rewrite the entire file structure, etc.
    >
    >Question 2: What make/model machine and what flavor of installation media do you have? Retail CD, OEM CD, proprietary "Restore" CD?
  4. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

    OK. Then I'd do it like Jon says to do it. Swap the drives but leave the old one
    disconnected for now. The only difference is that I would probably use a
    slightly different method for installing, but the preparation is the same. It's
    really the only decent way to ensure a clean system. I'd add that you should
    learn all you can about antivirus and antispyware, etc., and get your new system
    well barricaded against invaders *before* you re-attach the old, small drive,
    and then immediately do full scans of various sorts to detect anything that is
    there.

    What's the different method? After booting to the floppy startup disk with CDROM
    support (and we'll assume the temporary CD letter will be E:\),

    format c: /s
    c:
    md win98
    e:
    cd win98
    copy *.* c:\win98

    This will SYS the drive (making it directly bootable) and copy the installation
    files over to the drive. Just remove the floppy disk, reboot, and at the C:\>
    prompt:

    cd win98
    setup

    I see you asked about the "easier" methods. Well, it's all relative, and none
    are really that much easier. We're talking shortcuts-however, most of them would
    involve leaving the old system involved and visible. For the purposes of
    ensuring a good installation, I recommend you not take any of those shortcuts.

    --
    Gary S. Terhune
    MS-MVP Shell/User

    "GTT" <gttmailremovenospam@gmail.com> wrote in message
    news:dmlei19s3oes300usstj7ak1le1klacfq0@4ax.com...
    > Gary I just want a nice clean install with virtually nothing on it, no
    > problems such as spyware, etc. It is older pentium and I have the
    > retail win 98se cd
    >
    > On Tue, 13 Sep 2005 14:25:46 -0700, "Gary S. Terhune"
    > <grystnews@mvps.org> wrote:
    >
    >>Only if the partition on the larger drive is a Primary Partition. It probably
    >>is, but it may also be an Extended Partition with one or more Volumes.
    >>
    >>Question 1: Why are you installing a fresh copy? Many of the reasons people
    >>want to install fresh often derive from malware infestations (virus, spyware,
    >>etc.), and leaving the old system visible to the new one might very well
    >>reinfect the new system. Furthermore, if you want to make sure your new system
    >>is off to a good start, you want to either be *certain* it's a clean disk or
    >>you want to nuke it, wipe all data, rewrite the entire file structure, etc.
    >>
    >>Question 2: What make/model machine and what flavor of installation media do
    >>you have? Retail CD, OEM CD, proprietary "Restore" CD?
    >
  5. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

    And what is the easiest way?
    Thanks
    On Tue, 13 Sep 2005 14:32:29 -0700, "Jon_Hildrum"
    <Jon_Hildrum@amsn.com> wrote:

    >My suggestion (not the easiest but the way I would do it).
    >
    >1. Make a boot disk with CDROM support from the present win98SE
    >installation.
    >2. Make sure you have the product key for the CDROM. It is easy to get from
    >the existing installation before you do anything
    >3. Save any files you have on the D: drive that you want to save onto the C
    >drive prior to proceeding.
    >4. I would open the case and change the drive connections and jumpers to
    >make the the existing D drive the new C drive and vice versa. (Reason - If
    >you install windows on the D drive you need both the C and D drive
    >operational to boot windows since some of the windows boot files will be on
    >the c drive)
    >
    >5. Boot the floppy (the disk you made above). Note the drive letter for the
    >CDROM drive during boot up (I'm assuming F: below if not replace F with the
    >proper drive letter). Check to see that the C drive now is the the one
    >which used to be the D drive. You can type chkdsk at the A;> prompt. (It
    >will tell you the size)
    >6. Type format C: When complete insert the CDROM in the CDROM drive
    >7. At the A:> prompt type the following F:\win98\setup.
    >8 Setup will start. Then following the instructions.
    >9. Once you have completed setup and booted to windows and installed any
    >necessary drivers and everything seems to work properly, your ready to deal
    >with the old C: drive which now should be D:. (You would want to save any
    >data you may have their and you may want to clean it up (format it))
  6. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

    Thanks Gary

    I have decided just to do the following as I don't want to mess about
    in the box and switch drives around as I am concerned I will have to
    mess with the jumper switchs.

    I would like to simply reformat "c" and do a clean install.

    Could I simply copy my win98 cdrom files to a folder on D,
    make a boot floppy with cdrom support and then
    format c: /s
    If I then reboot without the startup disk will it just go to c prompt
    and will D be visible. Then could I type d: setup to install 98se?

    Would it be preferable to install the win98 folder on C as suggested
    for any reason?


    On Tue, 13 Sep 2005 16:49:52 -0700, "Gary S. Terhune"
    <grystnews@mvps.org> wrote:

    >OK. Then I'd do it like Jon says to do it. Swap the drives but leave the old one
    >disconnected for now. The only difference is that I would probably use a
    >slightly different method for installing, but the preparation is the same. It's
    >really the only decent way to ensure a clean system. I'd add that you should
    >learn all you can about antivirus and antispyware, etc., and get your new system
    >well barricaded against invaders *before* you re-attach the old, small drive,
    >and then immediately do full scans of various sorts to detect anything that is
    >there.
    >
    >What's the different method? After booting to the floppy startup disk with CDROM
    >support (and we'll assume the temporary CD letter will be E:\),
    >
    >format c: /s
    >c:
    >md win98
    >e:
    >cd win98
    >copy *.* c:\win98
    >
    >This will SYS the drive (making it directly bootable) and copy the installation
    >files over to the drive. Just remove the floppy disk, reboot, and at the C:\>
    >prompt:
    >
    >cd win98
    >setup
    >
    >I see you asked about the "easier" methods. Well, it's all relative, and none
    >are really that much easier. We're talking shortcuts-however, most of them would
    >involve leaving the old system involved and visible. For the purposes of
    >ensuring a good installation, I recommend you not take any of those shortcuts.
  7. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

    "GTT" <gttmailremovenospam@gmail.com> wrote in message
    news:q9ggi1pd60mqsqnbbj7ipaq1ddnqbqlouq@4ax.com...
    > Thanks Gary
    >
    > I have decided just to do the following as I don't want to mess about
    > in the box and switch drives around as I am concerned I will have to
    > mess with the jumper switchs.
    >
    > I would like to simply reformat "c" and do a clean install.
    >
    > Could I simply copy my win98 cdrom files to a folder on D,
    > make a boot floppy with cdrom support and then
    > format c: /s

    When you boot to the Windows Startup floppy disk, there's no need to enable
    CDROM Support, since you won't have any need to access the CD drive if the files
    are already copied to d:\win98. Otherwise, you have it right.

    > If I then reboot without the startup disk will it just go to c prompt
    > and will D be visible. Then could I type d: setup to install 98se?

    I'd suggest putting the installation files (lots & lots of CAB files, mostly)
    are in a folder called D:\WIN98. Don't just copy them to D:\. Copy all of the
    files from the WIN98 folder on the CD(but not the sub-folders) into D:\WIN98.
    The commands to use would be as follows (pressing <enter> at the end of each
    line):

    d:
    cd win98
    setup

    > Would it be preferable to install the win98 folder on C as suggested
    > for any reason?

    No, not really. Just remember--Don't access any of the old files you may have
    saved until you've properly protected the new system.

    --
    Gary S. Terhune
    MS-MVP Shell/User

    > On Tue, 13 Sep 2005 16:49:52 -0700, "Gary S. Terhune"
    > <grystnews@mvps.org> wrote:
    >
    >>OK. Then I'd do it like Jon says to do it. Swap the drives but leave the old
    >>one
    >>disconnected for now. The only difference is that I would probably use a
    >>slightly different method for installing, but the preparation is the same.
    >>It's
    >>really the only decent way to ensure a clean system. I'd add that you should
    >>learn all you can about antivirus and antispyware, etc., and get your new
    >>system
    >>well barricaded against invaders *before* you re-attach the old, small drive,
    >>and then immediately do full scans of various sorts to detect anything that is
    >>there.
    >>
    >>What's the different method? After booting to the floppy startup disk with
    >>CDROM
    >>support (and we'll assume the temporary CD letter will be E:\),
    >>
    >>format c: /s
    >>c:
    >>md win98
    >>e:
    >>cd win98
    >>copy *.* c:\win98
    >>
    >>This will SYS the drive (making it directly bootable) and copy the
    >>installation
    >>files over to the drive. Just remove the floppy disk, reboot, and at the C:\>
    >>prompt:
    >>
    >>cd win98
    >>setup
    >>
    >>I see you asked about the "easier" methods. Well, it's all relative, and none
    >>are really that much easier. We're talking shortcuts-however, most of them
    >>would
    >>involve leaving the old system involved and visible. For the purposes of
    >>ensuring a good installation, I recommend you not take any of those shortcuts.
    >
Ask a new question

Read More

Windows