Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Build a new PC, with no experience.

Tags:
  • Homebuilt
  • Windows XP
  • Build
  • Prebuilt Systems
  • Systems
Last response: in Systems
Share
May 10, 2006 10:33:40 PM

I plan to save some money up ($1000 - $1500) and build a new PC around Christmas. Here is my current system:

AMD Athlon XP 2800
1 GIG RAM
6800 GT

Where could I go to learn more about PC Hardware? The most I've done is put a new videocard in :p  I know I can learn on this site, but where would I go specifically?

Also, when building a new PC, where should I purchase my parts? All of it off of newegg? How would I go about building one for the first time? I'm very skeptical and have even thought of just buying a prebuilt one, but I really want to try to build a PC myself.

Thanks :) 

More about : build experience

May 10, 2006 10:41:15 PM

look at the benchmarks on this site. I guess the first thing you have to decide if you want an Intel or Amd/ single vs, dual core. Then find a compatible mobo. from this the ram is decided (ddr vs ddr2 with the different speeds). Choose a gfx card by the benchmarks. then add all the random hw (open up your old pc and see if you have everything it has). Ask lots of questions. if you look arond the forums you notice that most users are patient and nice.
May 10, 2006 10:44:20 PM

Thanks a lot. I think I'll spend time learning about stuff for now and then eventually decide what exactly to buy. Keep in mind, I'm building this around December, and in that time, there will be many new things out and prices will be bumped down on other things :) 
Related resources
May 10, 2006 11:17:48 PM

yeah by dec. conroe (new intel chip) and AM2 (new AMD chip will be out). Vista will be nearlxy there, and dx 10 gfx cards should be there.

To learn i suggest to take some old pc you have (if you have one, if not just ignore this) open it up and take a look at everything, take it apart and put it together again, you get a giant amount of experience and confidence and if it breaks, well you messed up some worthless pc and not you new rig
May 10, 2006 11:30:08 PM

As a first time builder these are the things you need:









And finally for you or your PC depending on your mood:

May 10, 2006 11:51:22 PM

I laughed pretty hard jaguarskx...that was funny.
May 10, 2006 11:56:35 PM

I would suggest buying a barebones pc and adding to it yourself.

Take for instance, Monarch Computer Systems.. They are a large supplier, similar to newegg and zipzoom. However, they also build systems (both full and barebones).

You get a lot of control on what you want in your rig. You pick the case, the power supply, motherboard and cpu. They will assemble it, flash the bios on the board and give it a 24 hour burn in test.

It's not a bad price either....they charge $45 (last I looked) for the labor. The price for each component is exactly the same price actually sell that item for.

You could then buy the hard drive, memory, ect and add them yourself.
May 11, 2006 1:04:57 AM

Thank you all, nice advice. I think I'm going to take apart my dad's computer >.>
May 11, 2006 2:20:07 AM

heya prozac:

lets go over a few basics.

1) good strong lighting.
2) flat surface to work on, a card table is good, also do not work over carpeting, static electricity is bad.
3) wear a grounding strap, if you dont have one just work bare armed, and make sure you touch the bare metal of the case often.
4) remove all jewlery, watch, rings etc etc.
5) always unplug the power, and hold in the power button for five seconds to discharge any residual energy from the system.

next lets talk about some not so comonly thought about issues.
Ask yourself.

1) Are you the type of person that is generaly good with mechanics.
2) when you put something together do you always have left over parts, and dont think twice about why?
3) Are you a patient person?
4) Do you find technical challenges irressistably intriguing?
5) Does the thought of working with computer hardware make you extremely excited?

If you find yourself answering other then what my answer key indicates then building or troubleshooting computer hardware probably isnt the best thing for you.

Answer key: 1)yes 2)no 3)yes 4)yes 5)yes

On the brightside if it isnt for you then you could always make friends that are techinically inclined -=D
May 11, 2006 3:06:06 AM

Hey Jag,

LOL

:D  :D  :D  :D 
May 11, 2006 3:18:46 AM

If you decide to purchase from the web Newegg is always a defacto standard but there are others trying hard to make your money too.

You have to be careful though.

my old standards for price comparison in order of use:
www.pricewatch.com
www.gotapex.com
www.fatwallet.com
www.streetprices.com
www.pricegrabber.com

If you decide to buy the great deal from someone you have never heard of please look here first:

www.resellerratings.com

great site just type in the name of the seller and you will likely get a lot of good information.

Hope this helps!
May 11, 2006 3:26:34 AM

Also,

There is no good substitution for experience. SO, if you have a reliable friend that has done this before and will actually let YOU build the PC it is always good to have them around (feed them pizza or something).
May 11, 2006 4:34:51 AM

Allright, forget about getting a bare bones kit or having a PC shop assamble it for you. If you do your homework, by December, you should have no problem building this yourself. Plus you will be happier knowing you did it all youself. I taught myself how to build computers. It's pretty easy, most parts now-a-days fit only one way, the right way, in the right place. It's not very complicated, and if you do run into any problems, you know where to come for help. Windows XP installs are alot easier then when I started back in the good ole' days of the Windows 98 era.

Just make sure you properly insert the Flux-Capacitor into your Interociter, otherwise you could could tare the fabric of the time-space continuum, casuing a galactic meltdown, in which case, you would have to come back here and ask us for help.
May 11, 2006 4:51:49 AM

Quote:
I laughed pretty hard jaguarskx...that was funny.


ME TOO
May 11, 2006 4:59:53 AM

I started building comps a couple of years ago.

The new MBs these days give out quite good detailed instructions on how and where to install stuff.

Better than buying any PC mag.

BTW i still like the way the zalman website has instrucitons on how to install their HSF mini movie clips!
May 11, 2006 7:14:55 AM

Quote:

1) Are you the type of person that is generaly good with mechanics.
2) when you put something together do you always have left over parts, and dont think twice about why?
3) Are you a patient person?
4) Do you find technical challenges irressistably intriguing?
5) Does the thought of working with computer hardware make you extremely excited?


1) hell no, usually have trouble doing anything mechanich, but pcs are different. You dont need to be a carpenter to build a pc
2) yes, always have leftover scrs when i work on my pc. (maily cause im too lazy to put all 6 screws ind to the hds though)
3) no
4) its a pc not a fighter jet
5) no relaxed

so you see you dont need any of the mentiones skills

Quote:

1) good strong lighting.
2) flat surface to work on, a card table is good, also do not work over carpeting, static electricity is bad.
3) wear a grounding strap, if you dont have one just work bare armed, and make sure you touch the bare metal of the case often.
4) remove all jewlery, watch, rings etc etc.

i do howerver agree with that
i dont want to star a war but i leave the psu plugged in and switched off to ground the pc
!