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Heavy Duty HP Laserjets - Current models vs used ?

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Anonymous
a b α HP
February 28, 2005 2:05:13 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

I managed a bunch of networked HP 4Si and 5Si printers back when they
were current models. They were great, and I know thy can be repaired
forever. I've been away from this stuff for about 3 years.

Now I see HP SDOHO printers and I'm not impressed.

What is the current HP model that is comparable to these workhorses ?

On the HP website it seems that the business b/w laser priduct line is
devided into the 4xxx, 2xxx, and 1xxx series. I that all the models
within one ov these catagories are basically the same, plus or minus
features.

I think i can get a refurb HP4Si (or if I'm lucky a 5Si) with duplexor
and jetdirect card for less than the comparable 2xxx printer.

Peak printing spead isn't a requirement. The new ones probably move
paper faster than the old one do.

Which would you rather have ?



--

a d y k e s @ p a n i x . c o m

Don't blame me. I voted for Gore.
Anonymous
a b α HP
March 1, 2005 2:01:58 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Al Dykes wrote:
> I managed a bunch of networked HP 4Si and 5Si printers back when they
> were current models. They were great, and I know thy can be repaired
> forever. I've been away from this stuff for about 3 years.
>
> Now I see HP SDOHO printers and I'm not impressed.
>
> What is the current HP model that is comparable to these workhorses ?
>
> On the HP website it seems that the business b/w laser priduct line is
> devided into the 4xxx, 2xxx, and 1xxx series. I that all the models
> within one ov these catagories are basically the same, plus or minus
> features.

You're mistaken. the higher the range, the heavier duty the device. For
example the current LJ2430 device has a maximum monthly duty cycle of
100k per month whereas teh LJ4350 has a maximum monthly duty cycle of
250,000 pages. The robustness of the LJ4000 range next to the LJ2000
range isn't obvious from a datasheet but if you put them next to each
other you'll notice the difference. The LJ4000 range is essentially a
modular device on whicxh you can hang many different sorts of paper
handling and finishing options along with multiple solutions and storage
options. The LJ2000 series is a direct descendent of the LaserJet 6P
which was a basic desktop machine. The LJ4000 range is the replacement
for the old 4 and 5 series.

If you want really heavy duty you need to look at the LJ9000 range which
is the replacement for the Si range. These are 40/50 PPM devcies with up
to 3000 sheet input and output plus stacking, staling , booklet making
and mailbox output options.

I reckon you've been away for more than three years ;) 

--
Mushroom
Anonymous
a b α HP
March 1, 2005 4:49:23 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Al Dykes <adykes@panix.com> wrote:
>
> I managed a bunch of networked HP 4Si and 5Si printers back when they
> were current models. They were great, and I know thy can be repaired
> forever. I've been away from this stuff for about 3 years.

[snip]

> On the HP website it seems that the business b/w laser priduct line is
> devided into the 4xxx, 2xxx, and 1xxx series. I that all the models
> within one ov these catagories are basically the same, plus or minus
> features.
>
> I think i can get a refurb HP4Si (or if I'm lucky a 5Si) with duplexor
> and jetdirect card for less than the comparable 2xxx printer.
>
> Peak printing spead isn't a requirement. The new ones probably move
> paper faster than the old one do.
>
> Which would you rather have ?

The LJ4000-series "instant-on" feature is nice. They are faster and
seem to be quieter than the LaserJet 5SI/8000 series. Print quality is
also very good. The downside is that the newer printers only take EIO
JetDirects, which are ridiculously priced. 4100 and up may not like
un-"chipped" toner.

--
Warren Block * Rapid City, South Dakota * USA
Anonymous
a b α HP
March 1, 2005 9:08:01 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Warren Block wrote:

> The downside is that the newer printers only take EIO
> JetDirects, which are ridiculously priced. 4100 and up may not like
> un-"chipped" toner.
>

You can buy the "N" versions which come with the JetDirect card
pre-installed and costs only a little more than the N versions.

NO HP Lasers refuse to work with un-chipped toner. It's illegal,
especially with HP's market share. What does happen is that the device
is unable to count the pixels laid down on a page and therefore cannot
give an accurate reading of the number of pages left in a cartridge.
This information is gathered from printign a supplies status page or by
looking at the device's embedded web server.

--
Mushroom
Anonymous
a b α HP
March 2, 2005 6:03:47 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Mushroom <mushroom@nospam.thanks> wrote:
> Warren Block wrote:
>
>> The downside is that the newer printers only take EIO
>> JetDirects, which are ridiculously priced. 4100 and up may not like
>> un-"chipped" toner.
>
> You can buy the "N" versions which come with the JetDirect card
> pre-installed and costs only a little more than the N versions.

LaserJet 4250: $899
LaserJet 4250N: $1249

The 4250N does include another 16M of HP memory. But $350 for an
internal JetDirect, versus $129 for an external 170X... that's a bit
much.

--
Warren Block * Rapid City, South Dakota * USA
Anonymous
a b α HP
March 22, 2005 10:47:20 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Mushroom wrote:
> Al Dykes wrote:
<snip>
> > Now I see HP SDOHO printers and I'm not impressed.
> >
> > What is the current HP model that is comparable to these workhorses
?
<snip>
>
> You're mistaken. the higher the range, the heavier duty the device.
For
> example the current LJ2430 device has a maximum monthly duty cycle of

> 100k per month whereas teh LJ4350 has a maximum monthly duty cycle of

> 250,000 pages. The robustness of the LJ4000 range next to the LJ2000
> range isn't obvious from a datasheet but if you put them next to each

> other you'll notice the difference. The LJ4000 range is essentially a

> modular device on whicxh you can hang many different sorts of paper
> handling and finishing options along with multiple solutions and
storage
> options. The LJ2000 series is a direct descendent of the LaserJet 6P
> which was a basic desktop machine. The LJ4000 range is the
replacement
> for the old 4 and 5 series.

<snip>

I've got to echo Al's comments. I've gone through 2 4050's and a 4100
which were workhorses. I just bought a 4250 and I'm not at all
impressed. Plastic everywhere, doors don't quite align when you close
them, it feels cheap.

I get the feeling looking at the printer that the art department had
too much say in the printer's layout. Putting the display in the toner
access door which gets slammed on a routine basis looks like the form
over function crowd won the day. Regardless what the duty cycle on the
spec sheet says, the 4250 does not give me the sense that it's going to
last more than a few months.

I'll post back here after a few months of use, but at this stage (the
printer arrived yesterday) I'm not impressed either.
Anonymous
a b α HP
March 22, 2005 2:00:02 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

In article <1111506440.754787.236250@l41g2000cwc.googlegroups.com>,
<michael.nospam@greenes.com> wrote:
>Mushroom wrote:
>> Al Dykes wrote:
><snip>
>> > Now I see HP SDOHO printers and I'm not impressed.
>> >
>> > What is the current HP model that is comparable to these workhorses
>?
><snip>
>>
>> You're mistaken. the higher the range, the heavier duty the device.
>For
>> example the current LJ2430 device has a maximum monthly duty cycle of
>
>> 100k per month whereas teh LJ4350 has a maximum monthly duty cycle of
>
>> 250,000 pages. The robustness of the LJ4000 range next to the LJ2000
>> range isn't obvious from a datasheet but if you put them next to each
>
>> other you'll notice the difference. The LJ4000 range is essentially a
>
>> modular device on whicxh you can hang many different sorts of paper
>> handling and finishing options along with multiple solutions and
>storage
>> options. The LJ2000 series is a direct descendent of the LaserJet 6P
>> which was a basic desktop machine. The LJ4000 range is the
>replacement
>> for the old 4 and 5 series.
>
><snip>
>
>I've got to echo Al's comments. I've gone through 2 4050's and a 4100
>which were workhorses. I just bought a 4250 and I'm not at all
>impressed. Plastic everywhere, doors don't quite align when you close
>them, it feels cheap.
>
>I get the feeling looking at the printer that the art department had
>too much say in the printer's layout. Putting the display in the toner
>access door which gets slammed on a routine basis looks like the form
>over function crowd won the day. Regardless what the duty cycle on the
>spec sheet says, the 4250 does not give me the sense that it's going to
>last more than a few months.
>
>I'll post back here after a few months of use, but at this stage (the
>printer arrived yesterday) I'm not impressed either.
>

I haven't worked with big HP printer since the 4050 vintage but since
I'm a proponent of a good on-site contract for any current high-end
printer, it the manufacturer's problem if they have to come out too
often to fix something they made.

If I have to evaluate big printer's I'll call up a couple reputable
local print repair services and get quotes for annual service
contracts for the models I'm considering. Is some model is a lemon it
will be reflected in the cost of the contract, if the model has been
around for a while and there is some experience.



--

a d y k e s @ p a n i x . c o m

Don't blame me. I voted for Gore.
!