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Overclocked 805D on ASUS P5WD2 Premium

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May 21, 2006 11:46:21 PM

Hello,

Well, I took the plunge and purchased the components to build a new PC for overclocking the 805D - components purchased:

1 ASUS P5WD2 PREMIUM 955x s775
1 256M ASUS EN7600GT2DHT
1 CORSAIR TWINX (2x512M) 1GB DDR2 6400 800Mhz
1 Pentium 805D Dual Core 2.66Mhz processor
1 ZALMAN CNPS9500 P4/AMD COOLER
1 Aspire Navigator Case with 500W PSU
1 WinXP Pro SP2 OEM

and I have

1x 160GB HD

Also, going to replace a broken 250GB HD IDE, will probably go for a SATA II Drive for this, it's being replaced under warranty.

Not all relevant, but here are my initial thoughts. All parts arrived on Friday, so spent Friday night building the system. A friend helped out and we had a few beers along the way. Got everything plugged in by midnight after starting at 8.45pm, 1st system rebuild in 10 years or so, so not bad at all. Expected 30 mins to install XP and that would be it. Could not get XP to install, and after trying everything we could we gave up at 5am. Next day started at 10am, and at 4.50pm we finally figured out the problem with installing XP - to cut a long story short, with this mobo, you have to install the IDE drivers pre-XP install. Nothing in documentation even suggests this... waste of 12hours... argh!! Still, we learned a lot trying to nail the problem.

Ok, so small delay to the build. I was then out on Saturday night, and got back to the system at lunchtime today - 1pm Sunday. Decided to setup the system with software I'm likely to use, then try the overclock.

At 11pm made my first overclock attempt. Raised the FSB to 166Mhz and RAM to 664Mhz - no other changes and system boots at 3.33Ghz :) 

Superb. :D 

Next straight off I tried raising the FSB to 180Mhz and RAM to 720Mhz, but system will not boot, get blue screen of death in windows, which kills the system before I even get a chance to read it. I'll need to get a quick shutter camera to grab the image.

No time to find out what's up, I shall think it may be voltage levels, or RAM latency as these are the two things tomshardware seemed to update.

I'll give it a good try on Tuesday night, next free night for this.

But... I'm damn happy that it's all built and running at 3.33Ghz already. Roll on 3.6Ghz if I can manage it :) 

Max I will try for is 3.8Ghz I reckon, I don't want to be spending money on watercooling.

Cheers folks, just thought I'd let folk know the overclocking ability with these components and the story so far.

Eoan
May 22, 2006 12:56:15 AM

We have that motherboard: here are some do's and don'ts:

(1) the Silicon Image and ITE controllers should be treated
as expansion cards which are NOT installed when you
first install Windows XP; disable them in the BIOS until
you are ready to connect devices to them and
load the device drivers from the support CD-ROM;
Windows Plug-and-Play will detect them properly,
after Windows is installed and running;

(2) if you want to install Windows to HDDs wired to either
of those 2 controllers, you must use the F6 sequence,
and this requires that you prepare a driver diskette FIRST
(typically on some other working PC to prep this task);
this was discovered the hard way, and there is extensive
discussion of this documentation flaw in the ASUS User
Forum for this particular motherboard;

(3) same is true if you want to configure the main
SATA ports as AHCI (i.e. 3.0 Gbps withOUT RAID);

(4) that memory will operate better if you first boot
into the BIOS and override SPD with manual latency settings;
then re-boot, to finish your install;

(5) by all means, trash the stock Intel heatsink/fan unit ("HSF")
and go with a modern HSF that has a proper backing plate;
for further details, see:

http://www.supremelaw.org/systems/heatsinks/warning.htm

(6) AnandTech recently did the same thing with that CPU
and an ASUS motherboard (I seem to recall):

http://www.anandtech.com

and search for recent articles on the 805;
also at Tom's Hardware (if I'm not mistaken).


I hope this helps.


Sincerely yours,
/s/ Paul Andrew Mitchell
Webmaster, Supreme Law Library
http://www.supremelaw.org/
May 22, 2006 9:48:17 AM

Quote:
We have that motherboard: here are some do's and don'ts:

(1) the Silicon Image and ITE controllers should be treated
as expansion cards which are NOT installed when you
first install Windows XP; disable them in the BIOS until
you are ready to connect devices to them and
load the device drivers from the support CD-ROM;
Windows Plug-and-Play will detect them properly,
after Windows is installed and running;

(2) if you want to install Windows to HDDs wired to either
of those 2 controllers, you must use the F6 sequence,
and this requires that you prepare a driver diskette FIRST
(typically on some other working PC to prep this task);
this was discovered the hard way, and there is extensive
discussion of this documentation flaw in the ASUS User
Forum for this particular motherboard;

(3) same is true if you want to configure the main
SATA ports as AHCI (i.e. 3.0 Gbps withOUT RAID);


Quite a major flaw with the documentation, on top of this, their forums are terrible, keeps telling me that the site is under heavy load and come back later. Looking at the number of posts on the page I could access I really doubt they get enough traffic to crash their forums.

Is there any reason to disable SATA in the BIOS now that it's running?

Quote:

(4) that memory will operate better if you first boot
into the BIOS and override SPD with manual latency settings;
then re-boot, to finish your install;


I shall try this, my memory is: CAS 5-5-5-15 - do I just set the values manually to this?

Quote:

(5) by all means, trash the stock Intel heatsink/fan unit ("HSF")
and go with a modern HSF that has a proper backing plate;
for further details, see:

http://www.supremelaw.org/systems/heatsinks/warning.htm

(6) AnandTech recently did the same thing with that CPU
and an ASUS motherboard (I seem to recall):

http://www.anandtech.com

and search for recent articles on the 805;
also at Tom's Hardware (if I'm not mistaken).


Yep, I settled on the P5WD2 Premium rather than P5WD2-E Premium, as I had seen it was possible to overclock on this.

Quote:

I hope this helps.


Sincerely yours,
/s/ Paul Andrew Mitchell
Webmaster, Supreme Law Library
http://www.supremelaw.org/


Great help, thanks!

Eoan
Related resources
May 22, 2006 9:51:46 AM

Quote:
You bought the wrong HSF for the job.
Going for 3.8Ghz+ doesn't need watercooling as THG said, they have servre limited knowledge in cooling.
It just need a 120mm class HSF such as Thermalright SI-120 or Zalman 7700Cu to accomplish that.


The wrong HSF? It gets rave reviews and has been used for overclocking the 805D is various setups. I won't be going above 3.8Ghz, I'd be more than happy at that level.

Is this HSF good enough to get 3.8Ghz stable? You have me worried now. :( 
May 24, 2006 12:29:16 AM

Quote:
I'll give it a good try on Tuesday night, next free night for this.

But... I'm damn happy that it's all built and running at 3.33Ghz already. Roll on 3.6Ghz if I can manage it :) 


Well, I got it up and running at 3.6Ghz by setting the vcore to 1.3875v - it's not crashed at this voltage level, was for about 5 mins at 1.375v but eventually caved......

Played Kong on it at new voltage level with full system virus scan running in background and it's not breaking a sweat. Ran a few CPU Right Mark tests. It's harder than I thought to maintain the CPU Load at 100% - all my other systems seemed to do this on startup :-)

I need to get some good benchmark software that I can run at it for a day or two to test things are ok. Other thread discussed CPU temp at 100%, when I had it at 1.4v it was getting close to 70C so I dropped back and took the incremental approach from 1.35v hence sitting where I am at 1.3875v.

Idling in BIOS at 57C but PC Probe showing at 51-53C with WinXP installed - this worries me slightly. So far max probed temp now 66C - a marginal improvement.

I'll update this thread with my benchmark results later.

I was expecting the CPU to be a bit cooler, from reading other folks attempts, although they don't all post the fully loaded CPU temp on there, just the fact that it stayed cool. It's thermal rating at 64.1C - I wonder if this is true given it's probably a chip from a higher end line. I think 3.6Ghz will be the max I'll try for.

Cheers,

Eoan
May 24, 2006 11:11:18 AM

Quote:
You bought the wrong HSF for the job.
Going for 3.8Ghz+ doesn't need watercooling as THG said, they have servre limited knowledge in cooling.
It just need a 120mm class HSF such as Thermalright SI-120 or Zalman 7700Cu to accomplish that.


The wrong HSF? It gets rave reviews and has been used for overclocking the 805D is various setups. I won't be going above 3.8Ghz, I'd be more than happy at that level.

Is this HSF good enough to get 3.8Ghz stable? You have me worried now. :( 
The Zalman 9500 only performs comparatively well against 120mm class HSF under normal condition, but still looses out. This margin significantly increases as you start pushing over 120W of heat through them where the 9500 simply does not have the capacity to carry that much heat.
Simple physics really when it comes to size.

As I said, THG(and most other sites) has the correct method of testing HSF to best accuracy but they fail in analysing the result correctly and proven in the D 805 overclocking article when using the 9500 showing it's weakness in physics.

Ok, assuming it's as simple as fan size then that would be fine, but the 9500 does transfer heat from the CPU faster does it not, so the fan becomes is not the only factor. Do you know of any comparisons done between these fans?

THG also said that at full load the CPU @ 2.66Ghz was hitting 78C and remaining totally stable - this is with the stock cooler. The intel site gives thermal tolerance as 64.1C - why the big difference? What CPU temperature would you say I should start getting worried at when system running at full load a) for short bursts b) over prolonged period - full load.

I want to stress test the CPU thoroughly and sit at a stable speed, but I don't want to fry the CPU on my first overclock - if I setup a 48hr benchmark and the temperature suddenly spikes, then will it fry the CPU? I suspect the CPU will use it's built in thermal protection and shut down.
May 24, 2006 12:01:10 PM

Interesting.

You bought the same board, chip, ram, and vid card that I did in late march.

I OCed to 3.4 for one day. left ram at 667 and bumped CPU FSB to 667. Stable, but decided not to OC long term b/c I am poor and can't afford to replace parts.
May 24, 2006 12:37:59 PM

I haven't heard of any 805D's failing yet, although no doubt some have. The Thermal Monitor 2 should kick in and shut the CPU down if it's too hot. In theory anyway.

Here are the temps reached at various frequencies in the thg tests:

[code:1:126759742e]
Pentium D 805 Zalman Cooler
Clock Rate 100% Utilization Idle Mode
4.10 GHz crash 52 °C
4.00 GHz 80 °C 49 °C
3.80 GHz 76 °C 47 °C
3.60 GHz 74 °C 46 °C
3.32 GHz 71 °C 46 °C
2.66 GHz 64 °C 44 °C[/code:1:126759742e]

I have hit 69C at 3.6Ghz although limited testing so far - so looks like I'm still within the parameters of their tests which reached 74C, however, I'm not sure that their tests were designed with long term processor use in mind.

I think I need another way of monitoring temperature, or is PC Probe accurate?
May 24, 2006 2:00:28 PM

Quote:
It's a combination, including HSF fin surface area and not just fan alone.
Thermal dynamics is not something easily understandable in real-life situation such as this and certainly a lot more complicated than you think it is.


I agree, I was just wondering if there were benchmarks done between these two fans that made you feel one was better than the other. Or have you tested yourself?

On my other question, what do you think the max operating temperature at load should be? THG were at 74C at full load and said it was stable, would you think this would be ok? It's very close to crashing at 80C and I like to have a bit of a safety zone.

On another note, my 9500 exhaust is oriented towards the rear of my case where there are two exhaust fans. I thought this would be best, however I could orient it upwards towards the case ceiling where the PSU exhaust fan and ceiling exhaust fan would remove the air. Do you think this would help the cooling? The PSU exhaust is surely more equipped to remove the hot air in the case. Or is this a double edged sword? Would the PSU then overheat? I'm a bit reluctant to take the fan off again, but if it's a difference of a few degrees C then it may well be worth it.

My case temperature is reasonably low - I have two temperature sensors one on HDD and one on CPU surface reading at 27 and 38 - so I think case is around 25-30C max which I think is ideal.

I'm wondering if I never applied the thermal grease properly. 1st time after all.

Edited to update my question on exhaust orientation.
May 25, 2006 2:41:24 AM

thanks for posting this up eoan, im taking the exact same "plunge" and need all the literature i can read about it.

could someone please help with a question to do with overclocking the D805 with this motherboard..?

i have a girlfriend who studies sustainable development, and she is always on me about saving power and being "greener". long story short, the power use by D805 when overclocked to, say 3.5ghz, is already pretty damn severe! im interested as to whether or not it is possible with the P5WD2-Premium BIOS to configure two separate boot configurations... one with the OCed D805 and the other with it running at factory clock?

i figure if i can load these two separately depending on use (gaming etc for the OC and word etc for the factory clock) then i can also save some dollars in my powerbill...

anyway, thanks for the help
May 25, 2006 10:38:08 AM

Quote:
thanks for posting this up eoan, im taking the exact same "plunge" and need all the literature i can read about it.

could someone please help with a question to do with overclocking the D805 with this motherboard..?

i have a girlfriend who studies sustainable development, and she is always on me about saving power and being "greener". long story short, the power use by D805 when overclocked to, say 3.5ghz, is already pretty damn severe! im interested as to whether or not it is possible with the P5WD2-Premium BIOS to configure two separate boot configurations... one with the OCed D805 and the other with it running at factory clock?

i figure if i can load these two separately depending on use (gaming etc for the OC and word etc for the factory clock) then i can also save some dollars in my powerbill...

anyway, thanks for the help


No problems, I'm not sure if you can have a dual boot bios - not heard of it anyway, but I wouldn't be surprised. If you want stock vs overclock and there isn't a dual boot bios, then you should probably settle on stock and overclock as required - once you know the overclock parameters you want to set in the BIOS these will become easily remembered.

I know there are tools available that will let you update BIOS from windows, not sure if there are any that work on the P5WD2 Premium vcore levels as yet, haven't spent enough time with it. If there are then I'd recommend that as your solution. Others will have more detail on this. If these tools exist, chances are you can setup BIOS profiles that you can apply as and when required.

On the greener side of things, my PC lives in the dining room - when I installed it I turned off the radiator in that room. My partner comes into the room and says it's like a sauna ( she's exaggerating I hope) :-) So although I'm generating more heat from the PC, I don't need to heat the dining room. It helps with this case since it has so many exhaust fans.
May 25, 2006 10:58:11 AM

Quote:
Reported temperature is a relative thing and can vary greatly in every setup so it's not a valid comparision.
What is a valid comparision is the point when a processor starts to throttle down due to overheating.

This is about the most closest you can get when comparing HSFs in a real-life closed case environment even though A64 @2420Mhz 1.7V still doesn't provide enough heat. It should however give you an idea when those results are extrapolated under higher heat that the differences becomes even more significant.

From this one can conclude the Zalman 9500 is overpriced, inferior and hyped compared it its competitiors.


Thanks for this wusy, good info if not such good news. It's not that bad a fan, just not the best one. I wish you'd posted this before I purchased though, I'll just have to make the most of what I have. :-) I have heard that the 7700cu is better for keeping the mobo temperature down due to its orientation e.g., backdraft, but was going on good faith that the 9500 was adequate for 3.8Ghz - I guess being new to overclocking I am bound to run into things like this. My mobo temperatures seem fine though, and with ASUS stack II cool, it seems to be taking care of keeping them low.

I won't lose heart though, although it may not be the most efficient fan, I am not aiming for 4.1Ghz - at the moment 3.6Ghz stable is excellent (once I've completed performance tests and CPU stress tests), I'm not sure I'll go for 3.8Ghz unless I get some information regarding the actual CPU temperature guidelines.

Can you help with my previous question on fan orientation? On top of that, I may be able to turn the side door fan around, blowing cold air straight over the mobo and CPU, this may help too.

Also, a question on the RAM - I have left it to SPD at the moment, any idea what I should be setting manual latency too for the RAM I have? Could the settings I have be negatively affecting CPU temperature? Are there any tools that will calculate this for me?

Cheers,

Eoan
May 25, 2006 11:19:17 AM

Quote:
For that I blame on Tom's Hardware Guide, first writting a misleading&limited HSF comparision in their latest cooling article, then using the inadequete Zalman 9500 to overclock the D805 when they should've used one of the 120mm class HSF they reviewed 6months ago here.


Yep, well we live and learn. On a positive note, the 9500 looks fantastic and since I have a window'd case, it's very impressive - especially to my wife who has no idea about PC's ;-)

I may change the fan at a later stage if I'm getting nowhere with the one I have. I'll continue for now though.

Thoughts on my other questions?
May 25, 2006 3:40:48 PM

Why overclock to 3.8?

The D805 overclocks like a charm to 3.3 and FSB 667. No change in voltage, little to no increase in temp and easy to acheive and stable.

Sure, it's fun to reach 4.0 and set new personal records, but for every day use, that modest OC is a nice sweet spot.
May 25, 2006 8:41:00 PM

I see all u guys at 3.6-3.8ghz... why on earth would i buy an Intel if i wouldn't want to clock it to 4ghz ??? Will this thing not run stable on 1.650v for daily use ? ( with watercooling - hate noisy pc's )

My old XP1700+ is still now ( after 3 years on 8 hours a day ) crunching away at 2400+...

Anyone here running a D805 on 4GHz stable ?? besides toms little helpers... (ie. plays CS, Fear, Oblivion, HL2 etc.. for hours )
May 25, 2006 8:54:50 PM

Well, 3.8Ghz stable would be fine for me, I'm getting 3.6Ghz but PCMark05 is currently crashing at the video encoding stage at both vcore 1.3875v + 1.4v - haven't managed to crash the PC - just getting windows error on this performance test - it gets past it fine at 3.3Ghz with no voltage increase:

Score at 3.3Ghz is 5484 if that means anything to anyone. Since I have the basic version I don't know what to compare against, all I know at present is its 1k+ vs the 2.66Ghz score.

Originally thought it was a programming error, but since it gets by at 3.3Ghz I'm inclined to think its overheating issue.

I have a few changes to make to the box to see if I can reduce the temperature - move the HD, tidy up the cables that sort of thing. The HD is currently directly in front of the only air intake fan I have, so its blocking about 20% of incoming air. That may explain why my internal sensors are 8-10C of a difference ;-) Currently at 3.3Ghz idle, one is attached to the HD, the other to the CPU and they are now registering 27C and 35C respectively - PC Probe reports CPU @ 51C and mobo at 35C

I have 3 IDE cables in the box - this is reducing airflow so may move CD RW & DVD RW to same cable - have them on their own cables :-) Thought there was no point putting CD RW on faster cable since it can't run at that speed.
May 26, 2006 3:18:55 AM

very impressive system !

Zalman 9500 - thermal resistance of HSF (heat-sink fan combination) - .12 degrees C per Watt.

Zalman 7700 - - thermal resistance of HSF - .20 degrees C per Watt.

to keep the math simple, if you have a CPU that's generating 100 watts, you will see a 20 degree C rise from air temp to base of the 7700.

vs. a 12 degree C rise from air temp to base of the 9500.

the 9500 did have some problems with flatness, which has, i think, been resolved.

does anyone know of a HSF combination that has a lower thermal resistance than the Zalman 9500 ?

i'd like to know. i might buy it !

one note about the 7700 - since it blows air out the side, it cools neighborhood components, like memory, the north bridge, and power supply components on the MB around the CPU.

the 9500 blows some air on those same components. hard to tell how much without actually testing the system.

from about 1980 to 2004, one of my jobs was to design heat sinks, and then to present the design, heat sinks, connectors, etc. to customers, other engineers, senior managers, etc. a lot of these design tasks have been genuinely fun, and in some cases, near impossible (e.g. cooling a transistor that's dissipating 100 watts and sitting 12,000 volts away from the ground source & cold-plate)

when i first got my 7700, i was blown away, super impressed, however you want to put it. that is one clever design. very simple, very effective.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.asp?Item=N82E1683...
May 26, 2006 9:16:25 AM

Quote:
thanks for posting this up eoan, im taking the exact same "plunge" and need all the literature i can read about it.

could someone please help with a question to do with overclocking the D805 with this motherboard..?

i have a girlfriend who studies sustainable development, and she is always on me about saving power and being "greener". long story short, the power use by D805 when overclocked to, say 3.5ghz, is already pretty damn severe! im interested as to whether or not it is possible with the P5WD2-Premium BIOS to configure two separate boot configurations... one with the OCed D805 and the other with it running at factory clock?

i figure if i can load these two separately depending on use (gaming etc for the OC and word etc for the factory clock) then i can also save some dollars in my powerbill...

anyway, thanks for the help


No problems, I'm not sure if you can have a dual boot bios - not heard of it anyway, but I wouldn't be surprised. If you want stock vs overclock and there isn't a dual boot bios, then you should probably settle on stock and overclock as required - once you know the overclock parameters you want to set in the BIOS these will become easily remembered.

I know there are tools available that will let you update BIOS from windows, not sure if there are any that work on the P5WD2 Premium vcore levels as yet, haven't spent enough time with it. If there are then I'd recommend that as your solution. Others will have more detail on this. If these tools exist, chances are you can setup BIOS profiles that you can apply as and when required.

On the greener side of things, my PC lives in the dining room - when I installed it I turned off the radiator in that room. My partner comes into the room and says it's like a sauna ( she's exaggerating I hope) :-) So although I'm generating more heat from the PC, I don't need to heat the dining room. It helps with this case since it has so many exhaust fans.

Had a look in the BIOS last night and there are BIOS profiles you can setup, I haven't tested them yet, but that's quite a handy feature - I'll have a go tonight at setting up a couple of profiles and seeing how easy it is to switch between them. Would be nice to have the option at startup.
May 26, 2006 9:35:35 AM

Quote:
very impressive system !

Zalman 9500 - thermal resistance of HSF (heat-sink fan combination) - .12 degrees C per Watt.

Zalman 7700 - - thermal resistance of HSF - .20 degrees C per Watt.

to keep the math simple, if you have a CPU that's generating 100 watts, you will see a 20 degree C rise from air temp to base of the 7700.

vs. a 12 degree C rise from air temp to base of the 9500.

the 9500 did have some problems with flatness, which has, i think, been resolved.

does anyone know of a HSF combination that has a lower thermal resistance than the Zalman 9500 ?

i'd like to know. i might buy it !


Thanks for your reply. So in theory the 9500 should be cooler! But in testbeds it's not proven to be.

Quote:

one note about the 7700 - since it blows air out the side, it cools neighborhood components, like memory, the north bridge, and power supply components on the MB around the CPU.

the 9500 blows some air on those same components. hard to tell how much without actually testing the system.


I wonder if the test is causing the RAM to overheat and not the CPU, it appears to be a memory error I'm seeing.

Quote:

from about 1980 to 2004, one of my jobs was to design heat sinks, and then to present the design, heat sinks, connectors, etc. to customers, other engineers, senior managers, etc. a lot of these design tasks have been genuinely fun, and in some cases, near impossible (e.g. cooling a transistor that's dissipating 100 watts and sitting 12,000 volts away from the ground source & cold-plate)

when i first got my 7700, i was blown away, super impressed, however you want to put it. that is one clever design. very simple, very effective.


I shall try tidying up the cabling first, if I can't get 3.6Ghz stable with the 9500 then I may try the 7700cu. Fun and games this OC business.

The link you sent is for the 7000 with 92mm fan, the 7700 is more expensive - I'm in the UK - found it here :

http://www.dabs.com/productview.aspx?Quicklinx=3WQD&Cat...

£38 ouch!

Or cheaper here.. about £29

http://www.tekheads.co.uk/s/product?product=603912

I don't think I mentioned that I'm testing with the case fans set low - reason for this is I have a small child who loves to turn the fan control on the front of the case, so I have to ensure that it will operate stable when it's been inadvertadly switch to a low fan speed. The case also has rear fan speed control, I've set this low too.

I may have to disconnect the front controller and leave at max.
May 29, 2006 4:30:33 AM

Quote:
No problems, I'm not sure if you can have a dual boot bios - not heard of it anyway, but I wouldn't be surprised. If you want stock vs overclock and there isn't a dual boot bios, then you should probably settle on stock and overclock as required - once you know the overclock parameters you want to set in the BIOS these will become easily remembered.

I know there are tools available that will let you update BIOS from windows, not sure if there are any that work on the P5WD2 Premium vcore levels as yet, haven't spent enough time with it. If there are then I'd recommend that as your solution. Others will have more detail on this. If these tools exist, chances are you can setup BIOS profiles that you can apply as and when required.

On the greener side of things, my PC lives in the dining room - when I installed it I turned off the radiator in that room. My partner comes into the room and says it's like a sauna ( she's exaggerating I hope) :-) So although I'm generating more heat from the PC, I don't need to heat the dining room. It helps with this case since it has so many exhaust fans.


Had a look in the BIOS last night and there are BIOS profiles you can setup, I haven't tested them yet, but that's quite a handy feature - I'll have a go tonight at setting up a couple of profiles and seeing how easy it is to switch between them. Would be nice to have the option at startup.

great, thanks for the info!

Ive always thought this was an unnecessarily undeveloped feature of a motherboard's firmware - configurable BIOS profiles. this ASUS board is popular for the enthusiasts, and im glad to hear they coded this feature in.

good reading :) 
May 30, 2006 4:20:37 PM

Quote:
So in theory the 9500 should be cooler! But in testbeds it's not proven to be.


http://www.thermalright.com/a_page/main_product_xp120.h...

http://www.thermaltake.com/coolers/4in1heatpipe/cl-p011...

so this leaves a few questions -
* are the Zalman thermal resistance numbers accurate ?
* when people test HSF combinations, do they test from ambient air temperature to heat sink base, or do they include the additional thermal delta from heat sink base to top of CPU case ?
* how do you accurately measure wattage input, when the HSF is installed on a CPU ? how do you know how many watts are going to the CPU and how many are going to surrounding circuitry ?
* what are the thermal resistance numbers for the thermalright & thermaltake ?

? ? ?

and one big final question - please could Tom's Hardware do a review to settle these uber-important questions ?

and one question after the big final question - how about measuring thermal resistance at equivalent noise levels ?

is there a good review already done that compares these heatsink-fan combinations ?
May 30, 2006 4:20:57 PM

oh my God, a triple post. Moderator ... any chance ... you could ... remedy this ?
June 9, 2006 12:12:32 AM

Ok, well with my limited knowledge of OC'ing I have been trying to monitor the results of this attempt... the story so far.

PCMark Results since I can't read the file it generates:

Test1:

Processor at stock speeds:

CPU Frequency FSB: 133MHz
RAM: AUTO
vCore: AUTO - 1.375v - I think this is the default

PCMark05 system score:

4455 - temp got to 62C max
4439 - 63C max - no changes
4751 - after moving things around inside case

Test2:

Overclocking starts

CPU Frequency FSB: 166MHz
RAM: now shows 664MHz available - I select that and on boot see my RAM increase to PC5300 from PC4200 - since it's rated as PC6400 this is nice...
CPU: 3.33Ghz
vCore: AUTO - 1.375v

PCMark05 system score:

5041 - min 49C - mean 51.3C - max 65.5C
5495 - min 49.5C - mean 52.5C - max 65.5C
5484 - moved stuff around to improve air coming into case - and I get worse result - didn't measure temps pre-move - I'm sure they are down though!
5539 - with new SATAII drive installed

Test3:

Ok - lets get going here - aiming for 3.6Ghz stable

CPU Frequency FSB: 180Mhz
RAM: now shows 720MHz available - I select that and on boot see my RAM increase to PC5700
CPU: 3.6Ghz
vCore: 1.4v

PCMark05 system score:

PCMarkCrash - System remains operational - no blue screen - On video encoding it wants to send a windows error report - I think it's internal temperature that's the problem, is my CPU cooler correct? Are the rear exhausts actually exhausts?

5854 - With the case door off (to check rear fans as I'm wasn't convinced they were exhausts) I managed to get PCMark05 to complete and provide a result - best result so far. The rear "exhaust" fans are actually intake fans. This is what happens when you build a PC while inebriated :-)

PCMarkCrash - min 51.5C - mean 54.6C - max 69.5C - Case door back on gives a 4C increase in temp. Again system remains up, just crashes PCMark05.

Test 4:

CPU Frequency FSB: 180Mhz
RAM: now shows 720MHz available - I select that and on boot see my RAM increase to PC5700
CPU: 3.6Ghz
vCore: 1.4v

PCMarkCrash - min 51.5C - mean 57.4C - max 69.5C - changed RAM to 4-4-4-13 - still crashing - next task - change rear intake to exhaust and side exhaust to intake. Using RightMark CPU Clock to monitor core0 and cannot see any throttling of that core.

Thats all for now, time to call it a day.

Cheers,

Eoan
June 9, 2006 9:46:43 AM

Yep i agree with the wuss a 7700 will do the trick... for a 3.8 oc
June 10, 2006 12:04:29 AM

Quote:
Yep i agree with the wuss a 7700 will do the trick... for a 3.8 oc


I probably also agree with wusy, however, I don't have the 7700cu at present and want to see how I can optimize the system with what I have available.

I have changed the paging file to be 1024MB initial and max, it's also currently on the IDE drive which has just been formatted, so it's got it's own channel, albeit slower than the SATA II channel it was on previously.

I think the case fans are a major factor here, I've not had the chance to switch them around yet, hopefully will do over the weekend. Need to get a filter for the side door fan if I want to make it an intake fan.
June 11, 2006 5:44:39 PM

Finally, success at 3.6Ghz

Test 5:

CPU Frequency FSB: 180Mhz
RAM: 720MHz
CPU: 3.6Ghz
vCore: 1.4v
RAM Latency: 4-4-4-13

Left overnight - approx 7 hours, overnight temps idle: min - 50.5 mean - 53.5 max - 62C

Test6:

CPU Frequency FSB: 180Mhz
RAM: 720MHz
CPU: 3.6Ghz
vCore: 1.4v
RAM Latency: 4-4-4-13

Changed side 120mm fan to intake and rear 2x80mm fans to exhaust - seems to have cooled the system down a fair chunk

Idle CPU @ 52.5 would be average, now CPU @ 49.1
HD Temps down also: from 42C & 43C to 35C & 36C respectively.
Case sensor temps down from 40C @ CPU and 44 @ HD to 38 and 34 - a huge difference in internal case temperature near the HDD.

Unfortunately, PCMark is still crashing - temperatue peaked at 66C and video/audio encoding didn't complete.

Test7:

CPU Frequency FSB: 180Mhz
RAM: 720MHz
CPU: 3.6Ghz
vCore: 1.4125v
RAM Latency: 4-4-4-13

Increase of 0.125 in vCore - managed to get PCMark to pass the video/audio encoding tests, but then the system crashed on next test. Promising that it passed the videoencoding tests. Next tests are Text Edit/ Image Decompression

Test8:

CPU Frequency FSB: 180Mhz
RAM: 720MHz
CPU: 3.6Ghz
vCore: 1.4250v
RAM Latency: 4-4-4-13

Increase of 0.125 in vCore -

5829 - with fans low, case door on :-) First pass at 3.6Ghz with case door on and only 2nd pass ever at 3.6Ghz. CPU hit 68.5C but stayed alive :-)
5894 - same settings again - hit 68.5C.

Test8:

CPU Frequency FSB: 180Mhz
RAM: 720MHz
CPU: 3.6Ghz
vCore: 1.4375v
RAM Latency: 4-4-4-13

Increase of 0.125 in vCore -

5838 - with fans low Temp hit 69.5C this time, Expected it to come down a notch.
June 12, 2006 7:42:13 AM

Ok, stability at 3.6Ghz was checked with Prime95.

After trying anoter voltage change I settled on 1.4250v to run Prime95 against. This has been described as the tool to stress test the CPU by many users of these forums, so I went for it with that.

Ran it overnight lastnight with the following setup:

CPU Frequency FSB: 180Mhz
RAM: 720MHz
CPU: 3.6Ghz
vCore: 1.4250v
RAM Latency: 4-4-4-13

Setup two instances of Prime95, one for each CPU core, each running Torture Test.

Results:

CPU0 - 7hrs 20mins - 0 errors - 0 warnings
CPU1 - 7hrs 19mins - 0 errors - 0 warnings

Temperatures are interesting:

System: 36C max
CPU: 73C max
70.6C mean
HDD's remained at 35 and 36 max

Case temps: CPU 50C HDD33

So the CPU reached 73C - hottest I've seen it, but it managed to stay up and running. Before I stopped the tests this morning I monitored the CPU clock with rightMark - neither CPU is showing any signs of throttling. This temperature is lower than the max temp THG reviewers got to on the stock CPU - 74C max.

On another note, the temperatures in Scotland in the last few days have been very hot, far hotter than normal 26C-30C, so starting temperature is problably up 5-6C at least, this can only be good.

Roll on 3.8Ghz on air! :roll:
June 28, 2006 12:25:29 PM

Hello folks,

Well I have been tinkering with 3.8Ghz on air:

So far:

Increasing the core voltage by .125 increments to 1.525v I still get a crash running Prime95 for just over a minute. Increase the voltage to 1.5375v and 1.55v and no crash (short test time) but the CPU is now throttling, first I've seen that.

Going higher on the voltage I don't think is going to solve this issue, it's only going to get hotter and throttle more. Was reaching 76C.

Solution seems to be either go for the Zalman 7700cu or a water cooling solution. Big Thermaltake or the like. Either that or it's an issue with the thermal paste application. Either way, I can't see any point trying for higher if the CPU is throttling.

I'm off on holiday and will consider the 7700cu on return, but right now, I'm leaving it at 3.6Ghz at a voltage setting of 1.425v.

Just thought I'd give the update.

Happy OC'ing.

Cheers,

Eoan

p.s. I did set the RAM back to using SPD - don't see changing that will help the CPU heat issue.
July 8, 2006 12:36:56 AM

have you had any luck getting your system stable @3.8GHz?
July 10, 2006 4:50:44 AM

Thank your very much for you posts. I am planning on building a very similar system and this really helps a lot.

Question: Do the repeated tests and crashes that occur when adjusting the voltage harm the CPU in any way? Does this process take life away from the processor? Also does running at the high speeds similarly decrease processor life even if low temperatures are maintained?

Thanks for your help.
July 15, 2006 3:09:57 PM

THANK you so much Eoan for your posts..I m also considering the system very much similar to yours..in fact it is the same system only difference with probably the brand names of the products...I will be waiting for more of your results and testing(seems you have put in a lot of effort in it haha :D )....

Anyways...(to techhead)...I dont think doing these tests and having crashes for these tests will really damage the cpu as long as you dont overdo it and anything wierd(sound, smell, etc) comes out from the hardware. well ok that was general knowledge..lol hope it helps

but one thing that i've heard from another thread is that as long as you keep the Cpu at moderate temperatures (not quite near to overheating), the life of the CPU would not be affected. So that means even at high speed, if you are able to maintain the cpu at low temps, then the life of the cpu wouldn't be affected.

for me, if i was to overclock it, I would overclock it probably to 3.2 or a little higher..and as time goes by..when liquid cooling prices comes down a little bit, i'll get it to 3.8 or higher...of course in between..i'll consider a zalmain to cool it down a bit... i would probably be expecting it to go smoothly for about 2 or 3 years ..then i'll change my pc again even though the d805 would probably have lasted till like 5 years and beyond? hmm
well thats what im guessing anyways...hope it helps
July 20, 2006 2:31:31 PM

I thought I would post my experiences with the 805d.

My use is mainly gaming, with multitasking (teamspeak, x-fire, thermal monitor) using dual monitors. I can play CS:S and see who's talking in TS, etc.

ANYWAY. Critical setup is as follows:

Intel Pentium D 805 ($115)
ASUS P5LD2 (non-delux around $140)
1GB G.Skill DDR2 6400 (about $119)
BFG 650 Watt PSU
Zalman ZM-WB3 Gold water block ($50)
Generic Pump and radiator kit (about $60)

My system is running stable at 4.23GHz idle @ 32 Celsius (89F) and max CPU @ 48C (118F)
http://www.voanet.com/forums/file.php?21,file=308
http://www.voanet.com/forums/file.php?21,file=314
http://www.voanet.com/forums/file.php?21,file=309

RAM speeds are 4-4-4-12 @ 352MHz
http://www.voanet.com/forums/file.php?21,file=315[/img]

Super PI runs 1MB in 28 seconds
http://www.voanet.com/forums/file.php?21,file=312

Aquamark scores 95k (video card is BFG 7800GT OC)
http://www.voanet.com/forums/file.php?21,file=313

Hope this helps someone! Congrats to all the 805d owners, what a superb chip!
July 21, 2006 2:50:09 PM

Quote:
have you had any luck getting your system stable @3.8GHz?


Hello,

I haven't spent any time on OC'ing since I got back from Lanzarote. Scotland has been hit by a mini-heatwave, and as the room my PC is in has no aircon I figured it would skew the results. Temperatures have come back down a bit now, so I should be able to get back to it.

I think without spending a bit more cash I've no chance of getting the system stable at 3.8Ghz. When the TG guys noticed it was throttling they switched coolers, which is probably the sensible thing to try. I'm pretty happy with the way the system is operating at 3.6Ghz, I think my next project is to mess around with the memory settings and see what extra speed I can get out of it. I have set it back to SPD at the moment.

Thanks for the interest folks, I really hope it helps.

Cheers,

Eoan
August 28, 2006 12:47:51 PM

well i have something to add.
i discovered that i get better a 3Dmark06 CPU score at 3.6GHz than 3.8GHz. i guess that's were throttling kicks in? my CPU runs at just over 70degC at during the CPU test.
i tried messing around last night with my HSF. took me four goes to get it back to normal, because i kept putting on too little thermal compund. you have no idea how how annoying that was!!! 8O
so then lads?! does everyone still think that the Zalman 7700 is the best cooler for the job?!
August 29, 2006 9:54:37 AM

Good luck with that.

The system has been running without a hitch at 3.6Ghz now, I haven't gone for another cooling solution and I don't think I'm going to. Very happy with the current performance and temps.
August 31, 2006 9:20:52 AM

I've got almost exactly the same setup, but I unfortunately ran into a processor which was of lower quality (default vcore 1.4v).

I've left it @ 3.2ghz atm, because it's perfectly stable and the temp from the asus probe shows it to never hit over 60 degrees, which I fancy as ideal operation for day to day stuff. Most importantly, this setting still allows my fans to run at reduced speed so the noise level is quite low, if I go to 3.6Ghz I get a LOT of extra noise and my electricity bill becomes somewhat hefty =P

I must say that I was a bit dissapointed at the cooling provided by the 9500, although it is obviously TONS better then the stock cooler, a friend of mine is going to buy this same configuration but I'm gonna tell him to buy a 7700 and see if it makes the difference, if it does I'll go replace the 9500 with a 7700 myself...
September 20, 2006 11:27:55 PM

Hello,

Well, I've recently been burning my CD collection onto the hard drive. Been going well for the last 2 weeks until tonight, managed to crash. Funnily enough, I had been monitoring the CPU as I noticed the temp gauge on the front of the case registered 46C for CPU, when I put on speedfan it was showing temps 70-73 when buring. I was sure this was too high.

Eventually crashed when ripping my partners copy of The Very Best of Sheryl Crow so she can hear it through the PC. :)  Oh well, there you go, after 200+ albums sheryl crow overheats the CPU, she is rather nice I suppose.

Anyway, since it's only the first problem I'll keep the settings as is and keep going. I wonder if it's a problem with dust build up in the case, I need to hoover it out and buy some fan filters. Outside temperature is probably only 14C, a whole 13C less than when I was building and testing the system originally. So can't see it being the room temp.

Anyway, if any more issues come up I'll let you know.

Cheers,

Eoan
!