Windows XP and Windows 98

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

I have two separate drives C & D. Can I have Windows XP
on one drive and Windows 98 on drive D?
6 answers Last reply
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  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    Yep

    "Victor Dale" <anonymous@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:424b01c49f71$51e1cd50$a401280a@phx.gbl...
    > I have two separate drives C & D. Can I have Windows XP
    > on one drive and Windows 98 on drive D?
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    you should install win 98 on C: then install XP on d:

    >-----Original Message-----
    >I have two separate drives C & D. Can I have Windows XP
    >on one drive and Windows 98 on drive D?
    >.
    >
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    Install Windows 98 first to drive C. After it is installed boot with the XP
    CD. After accepting the License Agreement you will be asked where you wish
    to install Windows XP. Choose your D drive. XP will write the boot files to
    the Windows 98 drive and the remainder will be installed to D. If you want
    to be able to see your Windows XP drive partition from Windows 98 make
    certain you format the XP drive as FAT32 instead of NTFS. If you want the
    Windows XP drive hidden from Windows 98 then format the XP drive as NTFS.

    --

    Harry Ohrn MS-MVP [Shell/User]
    www.webtree.ca/windowsxp


    "Victor Dale" <anonymous@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:424b01c49f71$51e1cd50$a401280a@phx.gbl...
    >I have two separate drives C & D. Can I have Windows XP
    > on one drive and Windows 98 on drive D?
  4. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    Victor Dale wrote:
    > I have two separate drives C & D. Can I have Windows XP
    > on one drive and Windows 98 on drive D?


    The simplest way I've found to dual boot between Win9x/Me and WinXP
    would be to partition your drive(s) roughly as follows:

    C: Primary FAT32 Win9x/Me/Legacy Apps
    D: Extended NTFS WinXP/Modern Apps

    Adjust the partition sizes according to your actual hard drive(s)
    size and the amount of space you'd like to allocate to each OS and its
    applications.

    Create the partitions using Win9x's FDISK so you can enable large
    disk support (FAT32). (No need for 3rd party partitioning
    utilities/boot managers and their frequent complications.)

    Install Win9x/Me first, being sure to select "C:\Windows" (or
    D:\Windows, if you prefer) when asked for the default Windows
    directory. When you subsequently install WinXP, be sure to specify
    "D:\Winnt" (or "D:\Windows," "C:\Winnt" as referred/applicable) when
    asked for the default Windows directory, to place it in the other
    partition. The WinXP installation routine will automatically set up a
    Multi-boot menu for you. The default settings for this menu can be
    readily edited from within WinXP. NOTE: If you elect to place
    Win9x/Me on the "D:" drive, you'll _have_ to leave the "C:" drive as
    FAT32.

    This method can be adapted to using 2 physical hard drives by
    placing the boot partition (C:, which still must be FAT32) and either
    of the operating systems on the Primary Master hard drive, and the
    second operating system on the second hard drive.

    It is also possible to have a 3rd partition for shared
    applications, but it would be necessary for such a partition to be
    formatted in the common file format (FAT32). The applications would
    also have to be installed into each OS (to ensure proper system file
    placement and registry updates), one at a time, but the bulk of the
    program files could be located on this common partition. I do not,
    however, actually recommend doing this as, if you were to uninstall
    such an application from one OS, you may not be able to gracefully
    uninstall it from the second OS, having already deleted crucial
    installation data during the first uninstall action.

    Just about everything you need to know (URLs may wrap):

    http://support.microsoft.com/support/kb/articles/Q217/2/10.ASP

    http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/pro/using/howto/gettingstarted/multiboot.asp

    --

    Bruce Chambers

    Help us help you:
    http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
    http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

    You can have peace. Or you can have freedom. Don't ever count on
    having
    both at once. - RAH
  5. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    No. You cannot have Win98 on drive D: It must be on C: where I assume it
    is now. You can however set up a dual boot system by installing XP on D:.
    One drawback is that you will still have to limit your computer to 512MB of
    ram, even under XP, in order to be able to run 98 when you want to.

    Another possibility is to simply upgrade to XP and then buy MS Virtual PC
    2004, which will enable to you to run both XP and Win98 at the same time
    (Win98 runs in a window on your XP desktop). You will then be able to
    communicate between them, which you cannot do in a dual boot setup. See
    http://www.microsoft.com/windows/virtualpc/default.mspx. While VPC will
    run on XP Home, Microsoft only supports it on XP Pro so if you have not yet
    purchased XP, buy Pro, not Home. There are lots of other reasons to "go
    Pro."

    With VPC 2004 you can have virtual computers running any flavor of Windows
    as well as most Linux distributions. For a list of what works and what
    doesn't, see: http://vpc.visualwin.com/.

    However, a lot depends on your hardware. Virtual PC is a neat way around
    the 512MB limitation for Win98 because no matter how much ram you have on
    your machine you only need to allocate what you need to for the virtual
    Win98 computer and don't have to live with the 512MB limitation on ram
    normally imposed by Win9x. You must have a license for Win98 as well as XP
    for this arrangement just like you do for the dual boot scenario.

    "Victor Dale" <anonymous@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:424b01c49f71$51e1cd50$a401280a@phx.gbl...
    >I have two separate drives C & D. Can I have Windows XP
    > on one drive and Windows 98 on drive D?
  6. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    While it is easier to set the dual boot up with 98 on the first partition
    and XP on the second you can install Windows 98 on a second partition. It
    takes a bit of effort and a basic tool to do so. See Doug Knox's
    instructions for doing this http://www.dougknox.com/xp/tips/xp_repair_9x.htm

    If the XP partition is formatted as FAT32 then you can see and work with it
    from Windows 98.

    There really are not any major reasons to choose Pro over Home version
    unless you really need the advanced security, you must install IIS or you
    need to join a domain.

    You can limit the amount of RAM used by Windows 98 by modifying the vcache
    http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=http://support.microsoft.com:80/support/kb/articles/q253/9/12.asp&NoWebContent=1

    --

    Harry Ohrn MS-MVP [Shell/User]
    www.webtree.ca/windowsxp


    "Colin Barnhorst" <colinbarharst@msn.com> wrote in message
    news:OjqFSO4nEHA.3224@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
    | No. You cannot have Win98 on drive D: It must be on C: where I assume it
    | is now. You can however set up a dual boot system by installing XP on D:.
    | One drawback is that you will still have to limit your computer to 512MB
    of
    | ram, even under XP, in order to be able to run 98 when you want to.
    |
    | Another possibility is to simply upgrade to XP and then buy MS Virtual PC
    | 2004, which will enable to you to run both XP and Win98 at the same time
    | (Win98 runs in a window on your XP desktop). You will then be able to
    | communicate between them, which you cannot do in a dual boot setup. See
    | http://www.microsoft.com/windows/virtualpc/default.mspx. While VPC will
    | run on XP Home, Microsoft only supports it on XP Pro so if you have not
    yet
    | purchased XP, buy Pro, not Home. There are lots of other reasons to "go
    | Pro."
    |
    | With VPC 2004 you can have virtual computers running any flavor of Windows
    | as well as most Linux distributions. For a list of what works and what
    | doesn't, see: http://vpc.visualwin.com/.
    |
    | However, a lot depends on your hardware. Virtual PC is a neat way around
    | the 512MB limitation for Win98 because no matter how much ram you have on
    | your machine you only need to allocate what you need to for the virtual
    | Win98 computer and don't have to live with the 512MB limitation on ram
    | normally imposed by Win9x. You must have a license for Win98 as well as
    XP
    | for this arrangement just like you do for the dual boot scenario.
    |
    | "Victor Dale" <anonymous@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    | news:424b01c49f71$51e1cd50$a401280a@phx.gbl...
    | >I have two separate drives C & D. Can I have Windows XP
    | > on one drive and Windows 98 on drive D?
    |
    |
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