XP Upgrade

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

I'm thinking about uprading from XP Home Edition to the Professional Edition,
if I do that will I loose all the programs I have previously installed on XP
Home Edition?
8 answers Last reply
More about upgrade
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    In news:E82D5B49-1683-44D2-ADF4-20023980FBF5@microsoft.com,
    Tom <Tom@discussions.microsoft.com> typed:

    > I'm thinking about uprading from XP Home Edition to the
    > Professional
    > Edition, if I do that will I loose all the programs I have
    > previously
    > installed on XP Home Edition?


    By definition, an upgrade (as opposed to a clean installation)
    means that all your programs, data, etc. are kept intact and
    nothing is lost.

    However, there are no guarantees. However unlikely, it's always
    possible that something can go wrong, and you should be sure to
    have a backup of anything you can't afford to lose.

    But are you sure you want to do this? Are you aware that XP
    Professional and Home are identical, except that Professional
    includes a few features (mostly related to security and
    networking) missing from Home? Most home users have no need for
    these extra features and will see little or no benefit by
    upgrading. Be sure that there are benefits there for you before
    doing this.

    --
    Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
    Please reply to the newsgroup
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    "Ken Blake" <kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> wrote in message
    news:un9vFEAoEHA.3712@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
    > In news:E82D5B49-1683-44D2-ADF4-20023980FBF5@microsoft.com,
    > Tom <Tom@discussions.microsoft.com> typed:
    >
    > > I'm thinking about uprading from XP Home Edition to the
    > > Professional
    > > Edition, if I do that will I loose all the programs I have
    > > previously
    > > installed on XP Home Edition?
    >
    > By definition, an upgrade (as opposed to a clean installation)
    > means that all your programs, data, etc. are kept intact and
    > nothing is lost.
    >
    > However, there are no guarantees. However unlikely, it's always
    > possible that something can go wrong, and you should be sure to
    > have a backup of anything you can't afford to lose.
    >
    > But are you sure you want to do this? Are you aware that XP
    > Professional and Home are identical, except that Professional
    > includes a few features (mostly related to security and
    > networking) missing from Home? Most home users have no need for
    > these extra features and will see little or no benefit by
    > upgrading. Be sure that there are benefits there for you before
    > doing this.
    >
    One other consideration. Based on other posts about the Home to Pro
    upgrade, if you have already updated Home with SP2, you will be unable
    to upgrade to Pro until you get your hands on a Pro CD that includes
    SP2 slipstreamed onto the CD.
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    He should be able to roll back SP2.

    "bxb7668" <bxb7668@somewhere.nocom> wrote in message
    news:ehEBO0AoEHA.608@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
    > "Ken Blake" <kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> wrote in message
    > news:un9vFEAoEHA.3712@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
    >> In news:E82D5B49-1683-44D2-ADF4-20023980FBF5@microsoft.com,
    >> Tom <Tom@discussions.microsoft.com> typed:
    >>
    >> > I'm thinking about uprading from XP Home Edition to the
    >> > Professional
    >> > Edition, if I do that will I loose all the programs I have
    >> > previously
    >> > installed on XP Home Edition?
    >>
    >> By definition, an upgrade (as opposed to a clean installation)
    >> means that all your programs, data, etc. are kept intact and
    >> nothing is lost.
    >>
    >> However, there are no guarantees. However unlikely, it's always
    >> possible that something can go wrong, and you should be sure to
    >> have a backup of anything you can't afford to lose.
    >>
    >> But are you sure you want to do this? Are you aware that XP
    >> Professional and Home are identical, except that Professional
    >> includes a few features (mostly related to security and
    >> networking) missing from Home? Most home users have no need for
    >> these extra features and will see little or no benefit by
    >> upgrading. Be sure that there are benefits there for you before
    >> doing this.
    >>
    > One other consideration. Based on other posts about the Home to Pro
    > upgrade, if you have already updated Home with SP2, you will be unable
    > to upgrade to Pro until you get your hands on a Pro CD that includes
    > SP2 slipstreamed onto the CD.
    >
    >
  4. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    Upgrading from Home to Pro is a reasonable thing to do. I don't understand
    Home users who get defensive about Home when others consider going beyond
    it. Users who do upgrade generally grow into Pro as they widen their
    interests. If the user is using any wireless devices Pro will certainly
    offer better service and more security, but Pro has dozens of tools not
    available in Home.

    "Ken Blake" <kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> wrote in message
    news:un9vFEAoEHA.3712@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
    > In news:E82D5B49-1683-44D2-ADF4-20023980FBF5@microsoft.com,
    > Tom <Tom@discussions.microsoft.com> typed:
    >
    >> I'm thinking about uprading from XP Home Edition to the Professional
    >> Edition, if I do that will I loose all the programs I have previously
    >> installed on XP Home Edition?
    >
    >
    > By definition, an upgrade (as opposed to a clean installation) means that
    > all your programs, data, etc. are kept intact and nothing is lost.
    >
    > However, there are no guarantees. However unlikely, it's always possible
    > that something can go wrong, and you should be sure to have a backup of
    > anything you can't afford to lose.
    >
    > But are you sure you want to do this? Are you aware that XP Professional
    > and Home are identical, except that Professional includes a few features
    > (mostly related to security and networking) missing from Home? Most home
    > users have no need for these extra features and will see little or no
    > benefit by upgrading. Be sure that there are benefits there for you before
    > doing this.
    >
    > --
    > Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
    > Please reply to the newsgroup
    >
    >
    >
    >
  5. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    In news:uYvVXeBoEHA.2492@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl,
    Colin Barnhorst <colinbarharst@msn.com> typed:

    > Upgrading from Home to Pro is a reasonable thing to do.


    Certainly. I didn't say otherwise. Nevertheless, for *most* home
    users, there is nothing in XP Professional that justifies the
    cost of upgrading to it. They don't need to join a domain, they
    don't run two processors, they don't run a web server, and they
    don't need any of the other features that Professional adds.

    Clearly, there are exceptions, and for *some* users, XP
    Professional is the right choice. My last paragraph below is
    meant to point out only that Tom should be sure that he needs or
    would use some of these extra features. As I said, *most* home
    users don't need them.


    > I don't
    > understand Home users who get defensive about Home when others
    > consider going beyond it.


    I am an XP Professional user, not a Home user, and I am not being
    at all defensive. If Tom needs Professional, he should get it;
    *most* home users don't and it's a waste of money for them, which
    is why I cautioned him to be sure before upgrading.


    > Users who do upgrade generally grow into
    > Pro as they widen their interests.


    I completely disagree with this. And even if it were true, the
    time to upgrade to Professional is when their interests have
    widened to the point that they need some of Professional's extra
    features. There's no point in upgrading because you *may* need
    some feature in the future.

    --
    Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
    Please reply to the newsgroup


    If the user is using any wireless
    > devices Pro will certainly offer better service and more
    > security,
    > but Pro has dozens of tools not available in Home.
    >
    > "Ken Blake" <kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> wrote in message
    > news:un9vFEAoEHA.3712@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
    >> In news:E82D5B49-1683-44D2-ADF4-20023980FBF5@microsoft.com,
    >> Tom <Tom@discussions.microsoft.com> typed:
    >>
    >>> I'm thinking about uprading from XP Home Edition to the
    >>> Professional
    >>> Edition, if I do that will I loose all the programs I have
    >>> previously installed on XP Home Edition?
    >>
    >>
    >> By definition, an upgrade (as opposed to a clean installation)
    >> means
    >> that all your programs, data, etc. are kept intact and nothing
    >> is
    >> lost.
    >> However, there are no guarantees. However unlikely, it's
    >> always
    >> possible that something can go wrong, and you should be sure
    >> to have
    >> a backup of anything you can't afford to lose.
    >>
    >> But are you sure you want to do this? Are you aware that XP
    >> Professional and Home are identical, except that Professional
    >> includes a few features (mostly related to security and
    >> networking)
    >> missing from Home? Most home users have no need for these
    >> extra
    >> features and will see little or no benefit by upgrading. Be
    >> sure
    >> that there are benefits there for you before doing this.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
    >> Please reply to the newsgroup
  6. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    Hi

    No, you shouldn't do. Your files, programs and settings should remain
    intact, although you may like to backup your valuable data files beforehand.
    I've never had any problems with the updgrade from XP Home to XP Pro.

    --

    Will Denny
    MVP - Windows Shell/User
    Please reply to the News Groups


    "Tom" <Tom@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:E82D5B49-1683-44D2-ADF4-20023980FBF5@microsoft.com...
    > I'm thinking about uprading from XP Home Edition to the Professional
    > Edition,
    > if I do that will I loose all the programs I have previously installed on
    > XP
    > Home Edition?
  7. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    One other important item missing in XP Home is the backup program that is
    installed by default in SP Professional.
    It is available on your XP Home CD.
    Yes, it is included! It’s just not installed by default.
    To install Windows Backup you will need your Windows XP Home Edition CD. Use
    Windows Explorer to open the \valueadd\Msft\Ntbackup folder and then double
    click Ntbackup.msi
    If your computer came with only a “system recovery� CD instead of a full
    Windows CD, finding Ntbackup.msi is not so easy. I suggest that you contact
    your computer manufacturer’s support people for instructions to locate and
    install.
    Once installed, it works exactly as in Windows XP Professional, with one
    important exception. You can’t restore your system using Automated System
    Recovery. If this is important to you, contact your manufacturer’s support
    people


    "Ken Blake" wrote:

    > In news:uYvVXeBoEHA.2492@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl,
    > Colin Barnhorst <colinbarharst@msn.com> typed:
    >
    > > Upgrading from Home to Pro is a reasonable thing to do.
    >
    >
    > Certainly. I didn't say otherwise. Nevertheless, for *most* home
    > users, there is nothing in XP Professional that justifies the
    > cost of upgrading to it. They don't need to join a domain, they
    > don't run two processors, they don't run a web server, and they
    > don't need any of the other features that Professional adds.
    >
    > Clearly, there are exceptions, and for *some* users, XP
    > Professional is the right choice. My last paragraph below is
    > meant to point out only that Tom should be sure that he needs or
    > would use some of these extra features. As I said, *most* home
    > users don't need them.
    >
    >
    > > I don't
    > > understand Home users who get defensive about Home when others
    > > consider going beyond it.
    >
    >
    > I am an XP Professional user, not a Home user, and I am not being
    > at all defensive. If Tom needs Professional, he should get it;
    > *most* home users don't and it's a waste of money for them, which
    > is why I cautioned him to be sure before upgrading.
    >
    >
    > > Users who do upgrade generally grow into
    > > Pro as they widen their interests.
    >
    >
    > I completely disagree with this. And even if it were true, the
    > time to upgrade to Professional is when their interests have
    > widened to the point that they need some of Professional's extra
    > features. There's no point in upgrading because you *may* need
    > some feature in the future.
    >
    > --
    > Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
    > Please reply to the newsgroup
    >
    >
    > If the user is using any wireless
    > > devices Pro will certainly offer better service and more
    > > security,
    > > but Pro has dozens of tools not available in Home.
    > >
    > > "Ken Blake" <kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> wrote in message
    > > news:un9vFEAoEHA.3712@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
    > >> In news:E82D5B49-1683-44D2-ADF4-20023980FBF5@microsoft.com,
    > >> Tom <Tom@discussions.microsoft.com> typed:
    > >>
    > >>> I'm thinking about uprading from XP Home Edition to the
    > >>> Professional
    > >>> Edition, if I do that will I loose all the programs I have
    > >>> previously installed on XP Home Edition?
    > >>
    > >>
    > >> By definition, an upgrade (as opposed to a clean installation)
    > >> means
    > >> that all your programs, data, etc. are kept intact and nothing
    > >> is
    > >> lost.
    > >> However, there are no guarantees. However unlikely, it's
    > >> always
    > >> possible that something can go wrong, and you should be sure
    > >> to have
    > >> a backup of anything you can't afford to lose.
    > >>
    > >> But are you sure you want to do this? Are you aware that XP
    > >> Professional and Home are identical, except that Professional
    > >> includes a few features (mostly related to security and
    > >> networking)
    > >> missing from Home? Most home users have no need for these
    > >> extra
    > >> features and will see little or no benefit by upgrading. Be
    > >> sure
    > >> that there are benefits there for you before doing this.
    > >>
    > >> --
    > >> Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
    > >> Please reply to the newsgroup
    >
    >
    >
  8. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    In news:22237D5B-B3E9-497C-9F06-97789A48BBA0@microsoft.com,
    Chuck Davis <ChuckDavis@discussions.microsoft.com> typed:

    > One other important item missing in XP Home is the backup
    > program
    > that is installed by default in SP Professional.


    Personally, I don't consider that an important omission at all.
    As backup programs go, it's probably the worst of those
    available. Whether you use XP Professional or Home, I would
    recommend a third-party backup solution.

    And besides, as you yourself say, it's not really missing, just
    not installed by default.

    --
    Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
    Please reply to the newsgroup


    > It is available on your XP Home CD.
    > Yes, it is included! It's just not installed by default.
    > To install Windows Backup you will need your Windows XP Home
    > Edition
    > CD. Use Windows Explorer to open the \valueadd\Msft\Ntbackup
    > folder
    > and then double click Ntbackup.msi
    > If your computer came with only a "system recovery" CD instead
    > of a
    > full Windows CD, finding Ntbackup.msi is not so easy. I suggest
    > that
    > you contact your computer manufacturer's support people for
    > instructions to locate and install.
    > Once installed, it works exactly as in Windows XP Professional,
    > with
    > one important exception. You can't restore your system using
    > Automated System Recovery. If this is important to you, contact
    > your
    > manufacturer's support people
    >
    >
    > "Ken Blake" wrote:
    >
    >> In news:uYvVXeBoEHA.2492@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl,
    >> Colin Barnhorst <colinbarharst@msn.com> typed:
    >>
    >> > Upgrading from Home to Pro is a reasonable thing to do.
    >>
    >>
    >> Certainly. I didn't say otherwise. Nevertheless, for *most*
    >> home
    >> users, there is nothing in XP Professional that justifies the
    >> cost of upgrading to it. They don't need to join a domain,
    >> they
    >> don't run two processors, they don't run a web server, and
    >> they
    >> don't need any of the other features that Professional adds.
    >>
    >> Clearly, there are exceptions, and for *some* users, XP
    >> Professional is the right choice. My last paragraph below is
    >> meant to point out only that Tom should be sure that he needs
    >> or
    >> would use some of these extra features. As I said, *most* home
    >> users don't need them.
    >>
    >>
    >> > I don't
    >> > understand Home users who get defensive about Home when
    >> > others
    >> > consider going beyond it.
    >>
    >>
    >> I am an XP Professional user, not a Home user, and I am not
    >> being
    >> at all defensive. If Tom needs Professional, he should get it;
    >> *most* home users don't and it's a waste of money for them,
    >> which
    >> is why I cautioned him to be sure before upgrading.
    >>
    >>
    >> > Users who do upgrade generally grow into
    >> > Pro as they widen their interests.
    >>
    >>
    >> I completely disagree with this. And even if it were true, the
    >> time to upgrade to Professional is when their interests have
    >> widened to the point that they need some of Professional's
    >> extra
    >> features. There's no point in upgrading because you *may* need
    >> some feature in the future.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
    >> Please reply to the newsgroup
    >>
    >>
    >> If the user is using any wireless
    >> > devices Pro will certainly offer better service and more
    >> > security,
    >> > but Pro has dozens of tools not available in Home.
    >> >
    >> > "Ken Blake" <kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> wrote in
    >> > message
    >> > news:un9vFEAoEHA.3712@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
    >> >> In news:E82D5B49-1683-44D2-ADF4-20023980FBF5@microsoft.com,
    >> >> Tom <Tom@discussions.microsoft.com> typed:
    >> >>
    >> >>> I'm thinking about uprading from XP Home Edition to the
    >> >>> Professional
    >> >>> Edition, if I do that will I loose all the programs I have
    >> >>> previously installed on XP Home Edition?
    >> >>
    >> >>
    >> >> By definition, an upgrade (as opposed to a clean
    >> >> installation)
    >> >> means
    >> >> that all your programs, data, etc. are kept intact and
    >> >> nothing
    >> >> is
    >> >> lost.
    >> >> However, there are no guarantees. However unlikely, it's
    >> >> always
    >> >> possible that something can go wrong, and you should be
    >> >> sure
    >> >> to have
    >> >> a backup of anything you can't afford to lose.
    >> >>
    >> >> But are you sure you want to do this? Are you aware that XP
    >> >> Professional and Home are identical, except that
    >> >> Professional
    >> >> includes a few features (mostly related to security and
    >> >> networking)
    >> >> missing from Home? Most home users have no need for these
    >> >> extra
    >> >> features and will see little or no benefit by upgrading. Be
    >> >> sure
    >> >> that there are benefits there for you before doing this.
    >> >>
    >> >> --
    >> >> Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
    >> >> Please reply to the newsgroup
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