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Need help with Math

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  • Overclocking
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May 31, 2006 1:25:20 AM

Ok I'm sorry its in this section the question is this
16 parts to 1 parts now if I have a 3 gallon bucket of water what is the formula for this please give answer in formulated sequence.

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May 31, 2006 1:47:40 AM

WTF? I've been out of school for too long to figure something that simple out :D 
May 31, 2006 2:10:11 AM

Quote:
Ok I'm sorry its in this section the question is this
16 parts to 1 parts now if I have a 3 gallon bucket of water what is the formula for this please give answer in formulated sequence.


Slow down there, and please restate the question.. im not sure what you mean by parts?

Are you mixing something?
Related resources
May 31, 2006 2:39:09 AM

Now lets see; are you helping your kid on his math homework, or trying to figure out how my car wash stuff to put in a bucket? Start simple and convert the 3 gallons to ounces and the 16 to 1 to 16 ounces to 1 ounce.

There are 32 ounces to a quart, and 4 quarts to a gallon. Therefore, the formula would begin as 32*4=128. there are 3 gallons, so continue with 128*3=384. Therefore there are 384 ounces in that 3 gallons. Devide the 384 by 16 to get your answer (384/16=24). so total sequence:

32*4=128
128*3=384
384/16=24

Doea that help? Hope your kid's homework turns out well, or you car gets nice a clean, whichever is the case.
May 31, 2006 2:41:50 AM

Sorry about the spelling mistakes. Its been a long day. I think I got the math right though.
Anonymous
May 31, 2006 3:56:16 AM

Actually Sailer slightly over estimated the quantity.

There are a total of seventeen parts. Sixteen of A and one of B.

So 384 ounces divided by 17 equals 22.588 ounces per single part (that is also the quantity of B) For A it would be 361.408 ounces (16 times 22.588).

So when mixing in a 16 to 1 ratio with a total end volume of 3 gallons (384 ounces) you would mix 361.4 ounces of A with 22.6 ounces of B.
Anonymous
May 31, 2006 4:07:05 AM

Formulated sequence.

For A:B = 16:1

A/B = 16

A + B = 384 fluid ounces (3 gallons)

so A =16B (from first equation)

and 16B + B = 384 fluid ounces (substitute first equation into second equation)

so 17B = 384 fluid ounces

B = 384/17

B= 22.588


then A = 16B

A = 16(22.588) = 361.408
May 31, 2006 4:26:49 AM

You got me. It has been a long day. But if he follows those formulas perfectly, he's going to have one clean car. Asuming of course that he washes with the same precision as he mixes. At least I got the total number of parts (ounces) right. Next time I'll ask my kid when it comes to 6th grade math problems.
Anonymous
May 31, 2006 4:31:13 AM

Actually it is kind of confusing. I was mixing some bleach today in a 10:1 ratio and I just realized that I actuallly ended up with a 9:1 ratio. (900 mL Water + 100 mL Bleach = 1 Liter - but is not the 10:1 ratio I was shooting for)
May 31, 2006 4:41:29 AM

My guess is that this guy is putting together one hell of a water cooling loop. Anyway the long math post (andrew's) is correct, what andrew was talking about in his last post is what happens if you try to do it sailer's way without over filing the bucket. Of course it assumes you put B in first. If you put A in first in sailors math there would be no room for B (course if you put b in first sailors way you may not be perfectly adequate but you would be plenty close.) Just put 22.5-23 ounces in and then fill your bucket.
May 31, 2006 5:07:49 AM

I have to agree with the other posters: the raport is 1 to 15 because in chemistry it is raported to the final amount of mixed solution (16) not between parts.
So part rapport is 1:15 but solution rapport is 1:16.


Now to the best part and completly of topic/of thread :
:oops:  how much is a gallon in metric liters? I keep founding pumps with gallons per hour and in stores they are in l/h. If you please:
May 31, 2006 6:11:10 AM

If I remember right, it is about 3.8 liters. For all basic purposes you can equate i liter to a quart.
May 31, 2006 8:05:47 AM

Quote:
I have to agree with the other posters: the raport is 1 to 15 because in chemistry it is raported to the final amount of mixed solution (16) not between parts.
So part rapport is 1:15 but solution rapport is 1:16.


Now to the best part and completly of topic/of thread :
:oops:  how much is a gallon in metric liters? I keep founding pumps with gallons per hour and in stores they are in l/h. If you please:


U.S. Gallon, or Imperial? 1 US Gallon is 3.785 L, 1 Imperial Gallon is 4.55 L.
May 31, 2006 10:25:13 AM

Thank you it has been 30 years since I have been in school and I could not help my son with this but I know now, thank you. I did a search and I had to read a wack of pages so I had this thought to ask my buddies in the fourms. I'm sure he will get a A this time, can not beleive grade 7 is taking this, hell in my day we were still doing adding and subtracting, how things have changed
May 31, 2006 10:46:43 AM

Quote:
can not beleive grade 7 is taking this, hell in my day we were still doing adding and subtracting, how things have changed

Amazingly true. My daughter is in grade 7, with ADD, and she still does

stuff that i did in grade 11, or 12...23 years ago. :oops: 
May 31, 2006 11:01:32 AM

16=1

3=?

3=.1875 Gallon or 24 Ounce or 2 beer bottle :wink:
May 31, 2006 1:21:11 PM

By the way, while it will not tell you how to do this google can do a lot of these conversions for you. You can ask for Gallons to Ounces or 3 Gallons to ounces, or Gallons to Imperial Pints (if you wanted) and Google will get you the asnwer. I think there is a way to do the mixing with google but I don't know the syntax.
May 31, 2006 1:58:35 PM

As for the problem I basically used the cross-multiply for the equation, since it is a proportion problem.

The problem is:

If 16 gallons is to the ratio of 1 gallon (16:1), then 3 gallon is to the ratio of how many gallon(s)? (3:X)

Equation:

16 = 3
1 X

Solution:

1x3 divided 6 = .1875 Gallon

.1875 Gallon is equal to 24 ounces using U.S. standard conversion

Simplified to 2 (12oz) beer bottle.

So if you're using this for your water coolant mixture then this is how it goes. For 3 gallons of water you will add 2 full beer bottles of coolant mixture. Does that answer your question?

:wink:

See, I still have my Math skills.
May 31, 2006 2:33:58 PM

I do assume that you emptied the beer bottles in a properly acceptable manner. Perhaps razvanstroiu is right about the part rapport/solution rapport thing that screwed up my math, as I used to use a lot of chemistry stuff as a doctor. No excuse though. Maybe I need to properly empty a beer bottle, watching a football game or something.
Anonymous
May 31, 2006 3:04:50 PM

No Chuck,what is confusing (read my bleach post) is that your total is 17 parts not sixteen.

The answer is 22.6 ounces of B and 361.4 ounces of A.

Check this. Desired ratio is 16:1 so A/B should = 16.
361.4/22.6 = 16; so this checks out.

Also the total amunt of fluid needs to be 384 ounces (3 gallons). Check this.
361.4 + 22.6 = 384; so this checks out.

In your solution. If part B is 24 ounces then part A is 360 ounces (384 - 24 = 360).

Check this. Does 360/24 =16? No 360/24 = 15; so 24 ounces of B gives you a 15:1 ratio.
May 31, 2006 3:19:32 PM

You got it wrong my friend. It says a 16 gallon of liquid would need 1 gallon of other liquid. That's the mixing ration 16:1. Basically this is somesort of mixture. So lets assume that Gomer is trying to mix a batch of liquid coolant for his pc's water cooling unit. Okay.

I say it again per 16 gallons of water there will be 1 gallon of coolant mixture to be added. So the question is how much coolant mixture is needed for a 3 gallons of water?

Since it is proportion, you will use the cross multiply equation.

Equation:

16:1 is equal to 3:X , what is X?

16=3
1 X

Okay cross mutliply the 1 and 3

So 1x3 = 3 and then divide 3 by 16

So 3/16 = .1875

Okay so X = .1875

Now lets put the X value to the original equation

So the equation above would be now:

16=3
1 .1875

Now cross multiply to check the answer is correct.

.1875 x 16 = 3 , 3 divided by 3 is 1.

Therefore the equation is true and that the X value of .1875 is correct.

So in conclusion:

A mixture of 16:1 ratio of 3 is .1875 of a gallon which is 24 ounces and that it is also equal to 2(12oz) beer bottle.

So a 3 gallon of water would need 24 oz. of coolant additive/ anitfreeze to get a ratio of 16:1 mixture.
Anonymous
May 31, 2006 4:34:50 PM

Chuck, I have an engineering degree, this is first or second year algebra - I am not wrong please read the following and follow along.

The desired ratio is 16 parts of fluid A to 1 part of fluid B. The desired total volume is 3 gallons. Lets look at the problem a different way and use ratios as you did earlier.

Add 16 gallons of A to 1 gallon of B. This gives you the correct ratio of 16 parts A to 1 part B. This also gives you 17 total gallons of fluid.

We want to have exactly 3 gallons of fluid. And want to add qauntities of A and B together to total 3 gallons when mixed. So we need to reduce the amounts of A and B from 16 gallons and 1 gallons to lesser amounts, that when mixed will yield 3 gallons.

The amount that we need to reduce our original amounts of A and B is equal to the ratio of the desired amount of mixed fluid (3 gallons) and the amount that we actually ended up with (17 gallons).

So 3/17 = 0.1765
If we multiply our original amounts by 0.176 we will get the correct amounts in the right proportions that will, when mixed, yield 3 gallons.

So 0.1765(16 gallons) = 2.8240 gallons of A
and 0.1765(1 gallon) = 0.1765 gallons of B

Lets check these amounts. Do A and B add up to 3 gallons?
Yes, 2.8240 + 0.1765 = 3.00 gallons.

Now are these in the correct proportions? Is A 16 times the amount of B?
Yes, 2.8240/0.1765 = 16. So this checks out as well.

Now to convert to ounces.
2.8240 gallons(128 ounces/ gallon) = 361.472 ounces of A
0.1765 gallons(128 ounces / gallon) = 22.592 ounces of B

So the correct answer in ounces is:

Approximately 361.5 ounces of A and 22.5 ounces of B

Chuck, if you can not accept this please take a print out of this thread in to your school and ask one of your teachers to go through it with you.
Anonymous
May 31, 2006 6:33:21 PM

Quote:
16:1 is equal to 3:X , what is X?

This is wrong. 16:1 is equal to y: x

You cannot put 3 gallons in for y; y +x has to equal 3 gallons!

So written as an equation 16/1 =y/x; where y = quantity of fluid A required and x = quantitiy of fluid B required.

You have two unknowns x and y, so you need two equations to solve for two unknowns. So the first equation is:

16 = y/x

The second equation is: y +x = 3

Solve equation one for y; y = 16x

Substitute this into equation two; 16x + x = 3
so 17x = 3; x = 3/17 gallons

Now solve equation two for y; y + 3/17 = 3; so y = 3 - 3/17 = 2.824 gallons.

The amount of fluid A is not 3 gallons. The amount of fluid A and B combined is three gallons!
May 31, 2006 9:12:40 PM

What are you talking about two unknowns. It's right there 16:1 3:X.

Okay try solving this with your formula:

4:2 = 2:X? What is X?

Then try using that same solution of your to solve the 16:1 = 3:X.

This is a ratio/proportion problem so a cross-multiply equation is the solution.
May 31, 2006 9:35:34 PM

Thanks Chuck. I really like it when someone agrees with me, that my original 24 ounces was correct. I do see one point that explains the different answers; is the three gallons the product to which the 24 ounces is being added, or is the three gallons the amount that is the final mix? If the three gallons is the product to be mixed with the second product, then 24 is the answer. If the three gallons is the final mix, then the 22.588 ounces is the correct answer. Either way, I'll empty the beer bottles in a proper manner. Next question, what brand?
Anonymous
May 31, 2006 9:42:33 PM

What is known is the ratio of the amount of A to the amount of B. You know that A:B is 16:1 or that A/B = 16/1.

The individual amounts of A and B are not known, this is what you must solve for using algebra

You keep assuming that A is 3 gallons. This is not true A + B is 3 gallons.

How much math have you had Chuck?

My formulas are:

Formula 1; A/B = 16

Formula 2; A + B = 3

Two equations, two unknowns. This is fairly straight forward algebra. Solve one equation for one of the variables and substitute that into the second equation.

So if A/B = 16 then A = 16B

Now rewrite Formula 2 but write A as 16B since A = 16B

So A + B = 3 turns into 16B + B = 3
so 17B = 3
and B = 3/17 gallons

Take this to someone that you respect that has had some advanced math and have them show you. Don't take my word for it.
Anonymous
May 31, 2006 9:50:45 PM

My apologies Chuck. I reread the original post and now I see that you were assuming that the volume of water is given to be 3 gallons. If this is indeed the original question you are correct. 24 ounces of B is needed to get the 16:1 ratio.

Hovever, if the total of the mixture needs to be 3 gallons then I am correct.

Once again, I am not quite as smart as I thought I was! My apologies, it appears that we are both correct since the original question does not clearly state whether the amount of water is fixed at 3 gallons of if the desired final mixture is to be 3 gallons.

It would appear that I need help with reading!
May 31, 2006 10:03:14 PM

Quote:
My apologies Chuck. I reread the original post and now I see that you were assuming that the volume of water is given to be 3 gallons. If this is indeed the original question you are correct. 24 ounces of B is needed to get the 16:1 ratio.

Gee, that was my assumption, that it was 3 gallons of water to which something would be added, back when I made my first post saying that the answer was 24 ounces, and I showed the math to prove it in simple terms.
May 31, 2006 10:27:26 PM

I see what you mean. Your formula was to make a total of 3 gallon of mixture but mine was, how much additive needed in a 3 gallon of water.

So 24oz. is needed to add to a 3 gallons of water to make a 16:1 ratio water to coolant additive mixture. 24oz is also equal to 2 beer bottle. :wink:
June 16, 2006 12:57:55 PM

I understand the 2 bottles of beer real good, I'm having one now thinking I have to drink 2 than 3 gallons of water which is 16 to 1 mixture I'll dirnk the 2 first than drink the antifreeze let ya know how it go's if I'm able too DUDES
June 16, 2006 1:10:28 PM

Nice, just make sure not to drink enough of it otherwise you'll forget to mix up some water coolant or do it wrong. :wink:
June 16, 2006 1:29:38 PM

If you guys could learn the metric system this would be so much easier
June 16, 2006 1:54:27 PM

no way I'd get less beer
June 16, 2006 10:18:58 PM

Quote:
If you guys could learn the metric system this would be so much easier
He's Canadian.. The metric system has been forced on us in school since ~1973. :wink:
!