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Which printer for printing much pages (more than 1.000 a d..

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Anonymous
March 17, 2005 8:09:25 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Hello,

I am searching for a printer that can handle more than 1000 pages
alone (so that I do not have to remove printed pages from printer).

What I found yet is a used solution from Lexmark Optra that has a 1500
paper input and 2350 paper output capacity, it costs about 700$
(used).

Do you know a solution for under 1.300$, laser or inkjet is okay, it
doesn't matter.
March 17, 2005 6:41:53 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

On 17 Mar 2005 05:09:25 -0800, hre346df5te@yahoo.de (Johannes Zalned) wrote:

>Hello,
>
>I am searching for a printer that can handle more than 1000 pages
>alone (so that I do not have to remove printed pages from printer).
>

Never mind the cost of the printer, check the cost of the toner!
Anonymous
March 17, 2005 7:54:25 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Johannes Zalned wrote:
> Hello,
>
> I am searching for a printer that can handle more than 1000 pages
> alone (so that I do not have to remove printed pages from printer).
>
> What I found yet is a used solution from Lexmark Optra that has a 1500
> paper input and 2350 paper output capacity, it costs about 700$
> (used).
>
> Do you know a solution for under 1.300$, laser or inkjet is okay, it
> doesn't matter.

1000pp/day is a very high throughput, which means that the choice is
rather more complicated that it appears. You're actually asking about a
industrial strength machine of the kind that a professional print shop
or a large office will use. Is that what you are planning? If so, I
would strongly advise you to go see the people who sell machines to
professional print shops - they will give you much better advice about
particular machines than you can get here. We're mostly home and small
office users, AFAICT.

That being said, here's my take on what matters most in your decision: a
service contract.

A service contract is IMO abolutely essential for your intended use.
Make sure you explain the rate at which you will print - most service
contracts assume a few hundred to a few thousand pages per month, and
you will exceed that several times over. The service contract should
cover all parts, labour, and consumables, no questions asked -- plus
training for you and your staff. (Service contracts don't usually
include paper, but you may want to make a deal on that, too.)

If the supplier will not provide a service contract tailored to your
printing needs, go to another supplier. In this respect, brand of
printer is far less important than service. You are going to really push
the printer to its limits.

The service contract should be structured so that you pay a flat fee for
your expected average monthly usage, and a per page price over and above
that. From my investigations, I would say that the contract should
average out to less than 3 cents a page, and on the high volume you
expect it could well be under 2 cents a page.

The Optra has a very good reputation, which unfortunately I cannot
confirm from personal experience. If you are buying it refurbished, from
a reputable office supply store, with a reasonable srevice contract, it
is probably a good buy. You need to know more about its expected life, I
think.

HTH&GL
Related resources
Anonymous
March 17, 2005 8:29:40 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

In article <y_m_d.66011$Jd2.1233309@news20.bellglobal.com>,
Wolf Kirchmeir <wwolfkir@sympatico.ca> wrote:
>Johannes Zalned wrote:
>> Hello,
>>
>> I am searching for a printer that can handle more than 1000 pages
>> alone (so that I do not have to remove printed pages from printer).
>>
>> What I found yet is a used solution from Lexmark Optra that has a 1500
>> paper input and 2350 paper output capacity, it costs about 700$
>> (used).
>>
>> Do you know a solution for under 1.300$, laser or inkjet is okay, it
>> doesn't matter.
>
>1000pp/day is a very high throughput, which means that the choice is
>rather more complicated that it appears. You're actually asking about a
>industrial strength machine of the kind that a professional print shop
>or a large office will use. Is that what you are planning? If so, I
>would strongly advise you to go see the people who sell machines to
>professional print shops - they will give you much better advice about
>particular machines than you can get here. We're mostly home and small
>office users, AFAICT.
>
>That being said, here's my take on what matters most in your decision: a
>service contract.
>
>A service contract is IMO abolutely essential for your intended use.
>Make sure you explain the rate at which you will print - most service
>contracts assume a few hundred to a few thousand pages per month, and
>you will exceed that several times over. The service contract should
>cover all parts, labour, and consumables, no questions asked -- plus
>training for you and your staff. (Service contracts don't usually
>include paper, but you may want to make a deal on that, too.)
>
>If the supplier will not provide a service contract tailored to your
>printing needs, go to another supplier. In this respect, brand of
>printer is far less important than service. You are going to really push
>the printer to its limits.
>
>The service contract should be structured so that you pay a flat fee for
>your expected average monthly usage, and a per page price over and above
>that. From my investigations, I would say that the contract should
>average out to less than 3 cents a page, and on the high volume you
>expect it could well be under 2 cents a page.
>
>The Optra has a very good reputation, which unfortunately I cannot
>confirm from personal experience. If you are buying it refurbished, from
>a reputable office supply store, with a reasonable srevice contract, it
>is probably a good buy. You need to know more about its expected life, I
>think.
>
>HTH&GL

Agreed with the above.

HP makes printers rated up to 300k pages/month with lots of optional
add-ons that you might find interesting.

http://h10010.www1.hp.com/wwpc/us/en/sm/WF02a/18972-236...

HP next-day onsite service has always been very good for me. I never
needed same-day service but I know they'll do it. 3rd party
maintenance can be very good but get some advice about the service
contract.




--

a d y k e s @ p a n i x . c o m

Don't blame me. I voted for Gore.
March 18, 2005 1:44:15 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

On 17 Mar 2005 17:29:40 -0500, adykes@panix.com (Al Dykes) wrote:


<huge mega snip>

>Agreed with the above.
>
>HP makes printers rated up to 300k pages/month with lots of optional
>add-ons that you might find interesting.
>

It would be more economical to split the work between 2 much cheaper printers.
March 18, 2005 1:44:16 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

On Thu, 17 Mar 2005 14:44:15 -0800, pete wrote
(in article <nv1k31p0cgk1dlqej4mm411qp022qob9j2@4ax.com>):

> It would be more economical to split the work between 2 much cheaper
printers.

And maybe hook the 2 (or more) printers to one PC for print serving. Keep
track of their print usage (can total pages printed statistics be accessed?)
and turn one or the other off if usage becomes imbalanced.
--
Please, no "Go Google this" replies. I wouldn't
ask a question here if I hadn't done that already.

DaveC
me@privacy.net
This is an invalid return address
Please reply in the news group
Anonymous
March 18, 2005 4:14:20 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Thanks for all your good advices.

I was thinking about a service contract but I think in my project it's
not that important: I want to print A4-Books with each 100 pages and
if the printer does not work I just can go to a near copy shop for a
few days. What I am searching for is a solution that's not that
pricey. I have found more options:

1. Lexmark Optra S 1650 with 2.000 Paper Input and 2.200 Paper Output
capacity, 36 MB and Postscript, 16ppm simplex duplex maybe 8ppm,
Parallel port only for 360 $

2. HP Laserjet 5Si with 3.000 Paper Input and 2.300 Paper Output
capacity, 16 MB, simplex 24 ppm duplex maybe 12 ppm, Parallel port
only for 700$

3. HP Laserjet 4350 (new) with 1000 Paper Input and 500 Paper Output
capacity and amazing simplex 50 ppm duplex maybe 40 ppm for around
1600$

What about speed in duplex mode, I heard that the speed differs much
from the simplex speed? And are the first two printers today that
robust that they can handle around 2000 pages without interfering from
me? What about parallel port? Is the printer faster if I will add a
network card to it or is the parallel port enough?

And maybe someone knows something about Lexmark Optra S 1650, I would
like to know if I can add two 1.850 paper output trays to it and also
if it's possible to add more than one 1.000 paper input to it.

The Lexmark solution is the cheapest and if something happens I just
can throw away all the staff, it's just around 360$ ! The Laserjet 5Si
solution seems to be a pretty solution that's more solid, although
it's very big because of the big sorter (for paper output). The
Laserjet 4350 is extremly expensive in relation to the other used
solutions but maybe I do not need a paper tray if the printer is so
fast, I can just sit next to my printer.
Anonymous
March 18, 2005 10:01:36 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

In article <b5b48a05.0503180114.4eb27bde@posting.google.com>,
Johannes Zalned <hre346df5te@yahoo.de> wrote:
>Thanks for all your good advices.
>
>I was thinking about a service contract but I think in my project it's
>not that important: I want to print A4-Books with each 100 pages and
>if the printer does not work I just can go to a near copy shop for a
>few days. What I am searching for is a solution that's not that
>pricey. I have found more options:
>
>1. Lexmark Optra S 1650 with 2.000 Paper Input and 2.200 Paper Output
>capacity, 36 MB and Postscript, 16ppm simplex duplex maybe 8ppm,
>Parallel port only for 360 $
>
>2. HP Laserjet 5Si with 3.000 Paper Input and 2.300 Paper Output
>capacity, 16 MB, simplex 24 ppm duplex maybe 12 ppm, Parallel port
>only for 700$
>
>3. HP Laserjet 4350 (new) with 1000 Paper Input and 500 Paper Output
>capacity and amazing simplex 50 ppm duplex maybe 40 ppm for around
>1600$
>
>What about speed in duplex mode, I heard that the speed differs much
>from the simplex speed? And are the first two printers today that
>robust that they can handle around 2000 pages without interfering from
>me? What about parallel port? Is the printer faster if I will add a
>network card to it or is the parallel port enough?
>
>And maybe someone knows something about Lexmark Optra S 1650, I would
>like to know if I can add two 1.850 paper output trays to it and also
>if it's possible to add more than one 1.000 paper input to it.
>
>The Lexmark solution is the cheapest and if something happens I just
>can throw away all the staff, it's just around 360$ ! The Laserjet 5Si
>solution seems to be a pretty solution that's more solid, although
>it's very big because of the big sorter (for paper output). The
>Laserjet 4350 is extremly expensive in relation to the other used
>solutions but maybe I do not need a paper tray if the printer is so
>fast, I can just sit next to my printer.


get some sort of on-site contract. You don't want to box and ship one
of these puppies for some small adjustment. At the very least,
identify a local printer repair guy that knows your model and keep his
card. If your machine is covered under the Manufacturer's warranty
his services should come cheap since all the parts are paid for. His
time will be cheaper than the cost of shipping if something has to be
fixed. He can also be a source of refilled toner cartridges if he
guarantees to fix the printer if they screw up.
--

a d y k e s @ p a n i x . c o m

Don't blame me. I voted for Gore.
Anonymous
March 18, 2005 2:47:32 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

10 Samsung $99 laser printers hooked up to a PC through USB ports.
Simply print the job (1 book each) to each of the 10 printers, and
they'll all hold 100 pages of output w/o you having to touch anything.

Due to the 15+ppm print speed of each printer, you can have all 1000
pages (10 books of 100 pages) printed far faster than any affordable
fast single printer could ever do - about 6.7 minutes total at full
speed rating (even at 10ppm, you'd get the entire 1000 pages or 10 books
printed and done in 10 minutes).

You can use fewer printers, eg. 5 lasers, and simply would print 5 books
simultaneously in 10 minutes, meaning you'd have to come around twice
for 10 books (one for each set of 5 books).

---

If pricing isnt' a killer, you may also investigate the Kinko's remote
printing option - here, you simply load up their software, their
super-fast printers show up as another printer icon, and when you print,
the entire job gets sent to your local Kinko's where it gets printed out
fast on their big ones.
Anonymous
March 19, 2005 3:37:59 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Johannes Zalned <hre346df5te@yahoo.de> wrote:

> I was thinking about a service contract but I think in my project it's
> not that important: I want to print A4-Books with each 100 pages and
> if the printer does not work I just can go to a near copy shop for a
> few days.

My experience is that service contracts would be a waste of money on HP
business-class laser printers. The variety of heavily-used printers
I've used lately just do not break. The pads wear, and the fusers need
to be replaced at a 100,000 to 200,000-page interval, but that's easy
and relatively cheap.

There was one LJ 4050 that broke, though: dropped from four feet in the
air onto a concrete floor. Upside down.

It looked like a total loss, with a lot of broken plastic on the top and
sides, and the display pushed in. Just for fun, we tried it. It still
printed. Replacement of the plastic case parts and display was
something like $150, and it still works great.

> What I am searching for is a solution that's not that
> pricey. I have found more options:
>
> 1. Lexmark Optra S 1650 with 2.000 Paper Input and 2.200 Paper Output
> capacity, 36 MB and Postscript, 16ppm simplex duplex maybe 8ppm,
> Parallel port only for 360 $

Older Lexmark stuff was supposed to be good, although a few models had
problems with PostScript or buffer RAM. Newer stuff...just gives me a
bad feeling.

> 2. HP Laserjet 5Si with 3.000 Paper Input and 2.300 Paper Output
> capacity, 16 MB, simplex 24 ppm duplex maybe 12 ppm, Parallel port
> only for 700$

The 5Si is a tough printer. Usually does not have PostScript. I'd
think you could get one cheaper than that, though.

> 3. HP Laserjet 4350 (new) with 1000 Paper Input and 500 Paper Output
> capacity and amazing simplex 50 ppm duplex maybe 40 ppm for around
> 1600$

A good and very fast printer, but duplex speed is probably not that
fast.

> What about speed in duplex mode, I heard that the speed differs much
> from the simplex speed?

It would be unusual for duplex speed to be more than half that of
simplex speed. Simplex will go as fast as the printer can go. Duplex
will too, but there will be some overhead time as the paper is flipped.
So expect duplex to be a little less than half as fast as simplex.

> And are the first two printers today that robust that they can handle
> around 2000 pages without interfering from me?

Don't know about the Lexmark, but if the 5Si wouldn't handle that, there
is something wrong with it.

> What about parallel port? Is the printer faster if I will add a
> network card to it or is the parallel port enough?

The 4350 comes with Ethernet, the 5Si is MIO--I think--so it would be
cheap to add. The 4350 Ethernet should be at least as fast as parallel,
the older MIO might be slower.

If you want speed, check what you are sending. Big bitmap images are
slow for everything. Small, efficient PostScript files (not
driver-generated!) and PCL are the fastest.

> Laserjet 4350 is extremly expensive in relation to the other used
> solutions but maybe I do not need a paper tray if the printer is so
> fast, I can just sit next to my printer.

For even more money, you can get a 500-sheet stacker or stapler-stacker
for the 4350.

--
Warren Block * Rapid City, South Dakota * USA
Anonymous
March 19, 2005 3:38:00 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

In article <slrnd3mt37.31jr.wblock@speedy.wonkity.com>,
Warren Block <wblock@wonkity.com> wrote:
>Johannes Zalned <hre346df5te@yahoo.de> wrote:
>
>> I was thinking about a service contract but I think in my project it's
>> not that important: I want to print A4-Books with each 100 pages and
>> if the printer does not work I just can go to a near copy shop for a
>> few days.
>
>My experience is that service contracts would be a waste of money on HP
>business-class laser printers. The variety of heavily-used printers
>I've used lately just do not break. The pads wear, and the fusers need
>to be replaced at a 100,000 to 200,000-page interval, but that's easy
>and relatively cheap.
>
>There was one LJ 4050 that broke, though: dropped from four feet in the
>air onto a concrete floor. Upside down.
>
>It looked like a total loss, with a lot of broken plastic on the top and
>sides, and the display pushed in. Just for fun, we tried it. It still
>printed. Replacement of the plastic case parts and display was
>something like $150, and it still works great.
>
>> What I am searching for is a solution that's not that
>> pricey. I have found more options:
>>
>> 1. Lexmark Optra S 1650 with 2.000 Paper Input and 2.200 Paper Output
>> capacity, 36 MB and Postscript, 16ppm simplex duplex maybe 8ppm,
>> Parallel port only for 360 $
>
>Older Lexmark stuff was supposed to be good, although a few models had
>problems with PostScript or buffer RAM. Newer stuff...just gives me a
>bad feeling.
>
>> 2. HP Laserjet 5Si with 3.000 Paper Input and 2.300 Paper Output
>> capacity, 16 MB, simplex 24 ppm duplex maybe 12 ppm, Parallel port
>> only for 700$
>
>The 5Si is a tough printer. Usually does not have PostScript. I'd
>think you could get one cheaper than that, though.
>
>> 3. HP Laserjet 4350 (new) with 1000 Paper Input and 500 Paper Output
>> capacity and amazing simplex 50 ppm duplex maybe 40 ppm for around
>> 1600$
>
>A good and very fast printer, but duplex speed is probably not that
>fast.
>
>> What about speed in duplex mode, I heard that the speed differs much
>> from the simplex speed?
>
>It would be unusual for duplex speed to be more than half that of
>simplex speed. Simplex will go as fast as the printer can go. Duplex
>will too, but there will be some overhead time as the paper is flipped.
>So expect duplex to be a little less than half as fast as simplex.
>
>> And are the first two printers today that robust that they can handle
>> around 2000 pages without interfering from me?
>
>Don't know about the Lexmark, but if the 5Si wouldn't handle that, there
>is something wrong with it.
>
>> What about parallel port? Is the printer faster if I will add a
>> network card to it or is the parallel port enough?
>
>The 4350 comes with Ethernet, the 5Si is MIO--I think--so it would be
>cheap to add. The 4350 Ethernet should be at least as fast as parallel,
>the older MIO might be slower.
>
>If you want speed, check what you are sending. Big bitmap images are
>slow for everything. Small, efficient PostScript files (not
>driver-generated!) and PCL are the fastest.
>
>> Laserjet 4350 is extremly expensive in relation to the other used
>> solutions but maybe I do not need a paper tray if the printer is so
>> fast, I can just sit next to my printer.
>
>For even more money, you can get a 500-sheet stacker or stapler-stacker
>for the 4350.
>
>--
>Warren Block * Rapid City, South Dakota * USA


I disagree about having some service agreement on a printer if it's
important to your business, unless you have a resident techie.

As for print speed optimization. Years ago I replaced a business's
1200LPM impact printer and warehouse full of cases of preprinted
multipart forms with a pair of 5Si printers. There were two parts to
this hack that made it a huge financial win;

I found a software package that let us take the form design and
"compile" it and load it into the printer before each print job and it
was "flashed" onto each page. The only data we were sending,
per-page, was a couple hundred digits of data. Almost zero HPCL
overhead. The result was a complex graphic invoice form that printed
at the mechanical speed limit of the printer.

The other part was elimination 3-part forms. The user was sending one
to a customer, one put in binders, on-site for a few months, and one
sent to a warehouse for off-site contingency. We put the invoice data
on his server gave him a simple application that let his customer
service people reprint any invoice on demand and the data has backed
up offsite with everything else.

He paid for the HP printers, and my time in the third month, not even
counting the clerical time to seperate all those 3-part pages each
month.

That was a fun project.






--

a d y k e s @ p a n i x . c o m

Don't blame me. I voted for Gore.
Anonymous
March 23, 2005 4:52:19 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

In article <8ns141taa3svt218jp6ttoq1hs8rlnpvf7@4ax.com>,
Marek Williams <abc@example.com> wrote:
>On 18 Mar 2005 01:14:20 -0800, hre346df5te@yahoo.de (Johannes Zalned)
>dijo:
>
>>2. HP Laserjet 5Si with 3.000 Paper Input and 2.300 Paper Output
>>capacity, 16 MB, simplex 24 ppm duplex maybe 12 ppm, Parallel port
>>only for 700$
>
>I'd strongly vote for the 5Si, or its later incarnations, the 5Si
>Mopier (Mopier 240) or the 8000. All are based on the Canon WX engine.
>They use the same toner cartridge, are the same speed, and most of the
>parts are the same. The rated monthly duty cycle is 130,000 copies.
>
>A great advantage of these printers is cost of consumables. I can get
>good quality toner carts for $45, including shipping. These carts are
>good for 15,000 copies. There is no other laser printer on the market
>that can come close to that cost per copy for toner.
>
>Before going further I need to note that you have one fact incorrect.
>The rated speed is 24 ppm simplex and 22 ppm duplexed. I use three of
>these to print books (one 5Si and two 8000s). I generally get about 21
>ppm duplexed. Considering how manufacturers hype the statistics,
>that's about par for the course.
>
>You can get a nice 5Si with low page count on eBay for well under
>$300. Shipping can be a bear on these, however, as the base machine
>weighs about 100 lbs. You really want to find one where you can drive
>to pick it up, not just to save the shipping, but to verify condition.
>

Tip: If you live in or near a city watch ebay for your printer and
sort the web screen for "closest first". Eventually one will show up
within driving distance. If you contact the seller you might even be
able to see it in operation before you bid on it.
--

a d y k e s @ p a n i x . c o m

Don't blame me. I voted for Gore.
Anonymous
March 24, 2005 12:20:21 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Thanks for the great survey of printers!


Laserjet
========
It seems if I ever want to buy a Laserjet I will stick with the 8000
Series because they are construct better for performing well with
printing books. But they are still expensive in my region, I can only
get a 8000 Laserjet + 2000 Sheet input and 2000 sheet sorter for
around 700-800 $ which is some money. There seem to be no stacker
available in my region, if I do not want to buy one new. It's also a
very big solution, the printer + stacker is very big.


Lexmark
=======
I could get a Lexmark (Optra S1650) system with 2500 sheet input and
output for less than 400$ which is smaller but maybe does not last as
long as the HP solution?


Canon park
==========
So I am looking for other solutions and what I found is that. It maybe
sound strange but I am looking for buying five Canon IP4000 printers
for printing my books. The costs per page are 0.30 cents with refilled
ink and I can even print color pages extremely cheap. With 18 real ppm
I will get a duplex speed for maybe 12 ppm which is with five printers
60 ppm. Or just better 80 ppm with simplex and turning the pages over
for manually duplex. Another advantage: the five printers putting
together do not take much room and look nice.


Comparision
===========
For example: Each week I have to print 100 books with 200 pages
(20.000). With the Laserjet or Lexmark solution I would need 10
reloads, but thats all, I do not have to interfere, but it takes at
least 16 hours with the faster Laserjet. With the five Canon solution
I have four hours of hard work but than it's done, in color.


What to do?
===========
As the price per page is equal, I do not know what to do. With the
Canon park I can print extremely cheap in color which is great for
competition, I am going into a closed market with high competition and
so the advantage of colored books maybe a plus for buying my books. On
the other side it seems to be that the Laserjet solution will last
very long, these printers seem to be really indestroyable. As I am not
for 100% sure of how much books I can sell, maybe I will start with
the Canon park, and if I am good at selling I am turning over from
colored books into black and white books and selling the Canon
printers and moving to the 8000 Laserjet. But I am really not sure if
the Laserjet solution is worth the 3-400$ plus instead of the Lexmark
solution ...
Anonymous
March 28, 2005 8:05:04 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

> Canon park
> ==========
> So I am looking for other solutions and what I found is that. It maybe
> sound strange but I am looking for buying five Canon IP4000 printers
> for printing my books. The costs per page are 0.30 cents with refilled
> ink and I can even print color pages extremely cheap. With 18 real ppm

or Epson park for refills - see www.inkjetmall.com for the CIS
Continuous Ink Feed system where you hook up huge cheap bottles of ink
externally, and print thousands of color prints before you ever run dry.
Saves a lot of time vs. hand refilling....

other models out there, too - niagara, etc. brands for bottle feed
systems...
Anonymous
March 29, 2005 9:54:29 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

As much as I love my iP4000 I don't think using multiples of them to print
large volumes is practical. Ink costs should be less than 2¢ per page and
your paper would be the other cost factor. If you are printing duplex you
would need a very opaque sheet to prevent bleed through from the opposite
side. The iP4000 is fast - for an inkjet printer - but don't be fooled into
thinking 18ppm is going to happen. The actual throughput is much less than
that. In my previous life I owned a few printshops and based on that
experiences I'd recommend you shop around for either a shop who can offset
print your materials or use a high end digital color printer. In that world
print volume translates into lower cost per sheet. Just my 2¢ worth.
--
Ron Cohen

"David Chien" <chiendh@uci.edu> wrote in message
news:D 2a635$nuo$2@news.service.uci.edu...
>> Canon park
>> ==========
>> So I am looking for other solutions and what I found is that. It maybe
>> sound strange but I am looking for buying five Canon IP4000 printers
>> for printing my books. The costs per page are 0.30 cents with refilled
>> ink and I can even print color pages extremely cheap. With 18 real ppm
>
> or Epson park for refills - see www.inkjetmall.com for the CIS
> Continuous Ink Feed system where you hook up huge cheap bottles of ink
> externally, and print thousands of color prints before you ever run dry.
> Saves a lot of time vs. hand refilling....
>
> other models out there, too - niagara, etc. brands for bottle feed
> systems...
Anonymous
April 5, 2005 5:32:53 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

In my opinion, the Inkjet is not a good option for printing books!
The ink tends to fade over time, especially with sun exposure. Also,
the printers are not intended for high volume or long-term use.
Bleed-through is an issue. Print quality is decent, but they still
can't match a laser for razor-sharp text.

I purchased an HP Mopier 320, which is the exact same printer as a
Laserjet 8150, for $399 on eBay with the 2000-sheet input bin. It was
local so I paid no shipping charges. Prints 32 pages per minute and is
very, very trouble-free. I've had to replace the fuser once (also did
the rollers at the same time .. total cost $199 .. also from eBay) and
put a few cartridges in. It's over 130k pages and running strong. The
5si that I retired had over 1.2 million pages on it and was still
working fine.

I tried using cheap inkjets (HP DeskJet 970) to print fliers and had
nothing but hassles. It works, but is slow, expensive, and the
printers don't last very long. And that was runs of 1,250 duplex
pieces total!

Bottom line, in my opinion: use a tool for it's intended purpose.
The IP3000 is a consumer-grade printer that is designed for occasional
printing. I'd be surprised if one lasted a month at 1,000 pages a day.
The Mopier320 / Laserjet 8100 is intended for 150,000 pages per month.
I'm extraordinarily happy with mine.

The Mopier 320 was a $3k+ printer new without the accessories.. you
can't hope to replace that with a few $150 inkjets. It just won't
work. Get one or two of the inkjets for printing the occasional color
page - they're awesome at that! :-)

-David

Jochen Stark wrote:
> get a 8000 Laserjet + 2000 Sheet input and 2000 sheet sorter for
> around 700-800 $ which is some money. There seem to be no stacker

> Canon park
> ==========
> So I am looking for other solutions and what I found is that. It
maybe
> sound strange but I am looking for buying five Canon IP4000 printers
> for printing my books. The costs per page are 0.30 cents with
refilled
> ink and I can even print color pages extremely cheap. With 18 real
ppm
> I will get a duplex speed for maybe 12 ppm which is with five
printers
> 60 ppm. Or just better 80 ppm with simplex and turning the pages over
> for manually duplex. Another advantage: the five printers putting
> together do not take much room and look nice.
!