Epson Ink Problem

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Hi!

I have an Epson 890 Photo which i am having problems with. Each time i
print an A4 sheet of pictures (contact sheet) the printer dumps a line
of black ink across the page (roughly 2cm into the print) which then
gets dragged all down the page and ruins the rest of the pictures.

The ink dunped appears not to be a printed line because it is dragged
or smudged so it appears to be blobs of ink.

If i print a letter or anything else all is well. This is naturally
very frustrating and have grown tired of banging my head on the wall.

Thanks for any suggestions.

Engelkott
46 answers Last reply
More about epson problem
  1. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Engelkott wrote:

    >
    > Hi!
    >
    > I have an Epson 890 Photo which i am having problems with. Each time i
    > print an A4 sheet of pictures (contact sheet) the printer dumps a line
    > of black ink across the page (roughly 2cm into the print) which then
    > gets dragged all down the page and ruins the rest of the pictures.
    >
    > The ink dunped appears not to be a printed line because it is dragged
    > or smudged so it appears to be blobs of ink.
    >
    > If i print a letter or anything else all is well. This is naturally
    > very frustrating and have grown tired of banging my head on the wall.
    >
    > Thanks for any suggestions.
    >
    > Engelkott
    >
    >

    I'm not an Epson expert. But I don't I need be in this case. . . .

    Something as simple as a slightly curled sheet - and photo papers
    can be notoriously curly - can do this by inadvertently making contact
    with the print head as it passes overhead. Remember the gap between
    the print head and the paper is very SMALL. The underneaths of print
    heads always carry patches of old ink. Try to straighten the paper
    as much as possible so that it is almost perfectly flat, so that
    no part of it will be "high enough" to strike the print head. Or if
    necessary, curve it slightly by hand to the shape of the paper path.
    I have had this happen myself with various papers. Remember, you had
    stated that it doesn't do this with normal text printing. Good luck!

    -Taliesyn
    __________________________________________________________
    The Taliesyn Website: http://www.colba.net/~andresk
  2. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    >
    >I'm not an Epson expert. But I don't I need be in this case. . . .
    >
    >Something as simple as a slightly curled sheet - and photo papers
    >can be notoriously curly - can do this by inadvertently making contact
    >with the print head as it passes overhead. Remember the gap between
    >the print head and the paper is very SMALL. The underneaths of print
    >heads always carry patches of old ink. Try to straighten the paper
    >as much as possible so that it is almost perfectly flat, so that
    >no part of it will be "high enough" to strike the print head. Or if
    >necessary, curve it slightly by hand to the shape of the paper path.
    >I have had this happen myself with various papers. Remember, you had
    >stated that it doesn't do this with normal text printing. Good luck!
    >
    >-Taliesyn
    >__________________________________________________________
    >The Taliesyn Website: http://www.colba.net/~andresk

    Thanks for the reply! What you have said makes perfect sense now you
    have said it! :) The corners of the paper do curl up slightly so i
    will try to straighten them. The paper in question was Ilford Satin
    paper.

    One question i have though is why does it take 2cm to deposit the ink
    across the page and not straight away?

    Cheers!

    Engelkott
  3. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Engelkott wrote:

    >>I'm not an Epson expert. But I don't I need be in this case. . . .
    >>
    >>Something as simple as a slightly curled sheet - and photo papers
    >>can be notoriously curly - can do this by inadvertently making contact
    >>with the print head as it passes overhead. Remember the gap between
    >>the print head and the paper is very SMALL. The underneaths of print
    >>heads always carry patches of old ink. Try to straighten the paper
    >>as much as possible so that it is almost perfectly flat, so that
    >>no part of it will be "high enough" to strike the print head. Or if
    >>necessary, curve it slightly by hand to the shape of the paper path.
    >>I have had this happen myself with various papers. Remember, you had
    >>stated that it doesn't do this with normal text printing. Good luck!
    >>
    >>-Taliesyn
    >>__________________________________________________________
    >>The Taliesyn Website: http://www.colba.net/~andresk
    >
    >
    > Thanks for the reply! What you have said makes perfect sense now you
    > have said it! :) The corners of the paper do curl up slightly so i
    > will try to straighten them. The paper in question was Ilford Satin
    > paper.
    >
    > One question i have though is why does it take 2cm to deposit the ink
    > across the page and not straight away?
    >

    Just the way it feeds, I guess. Yes, those corners are the most
    important parts. I have actually had this happen on slightly
    curled at the edges coated paper on my Canons (iP5000 and i860).
    After a few black stained ones I got the message that the printers
    didn't like their pages curled. :-(

    > Cheers!
    >
    > Engelkott

    Cheers to you too, and may all your pages remain flat!

    -Taliesyn
    __________________________________________________________
    The Taliesyn Website: http://www.colba.net/~andresk
  4. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    On 20-Mar-2005, Engelkott <nomail@hotmail.com> wrote:

    > >Something as simple as a slightly curled sheet - and photo papers
    > >can be notoriously curly - can do this by inadvertently making contact
    > >with the print head as it passes overhead.

    If you keep it flat under a book or similar, the weight will stop it
    curling (flower press principle). The flat card packs paper
    comes in are ok until you remove some sheets, the rest then
    curls.
  5. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Just another thought, could it be paper thickness too? I have never
    adjusted the lever on the side for paper thickness so maybe if i move
    that it would help?

    Cheers!
  6. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Taliesyn is on target with the paper curl issue. Canon support has an faq
    that deals with this problem and has the fix that Taliesyn suggests. I have
    a canon i960 and had a similar problem. I found that when I left photo
    glossy paper in the printer feed area over a period of time it took a slight
    curve and caused the problem. I now store my paper flat in a drawer and
    only load it onto the feed area when I am printing. I remove what is left
    after a print session and put it back in the flat storage area in my desk.
    On the Canon there is a software adjustment for thicker paper and it works
    well. It is a nuisance as there is a pop-up box that appears with each
    print you do to verify the thicker paper function. On the Epson I had there
    was simply a lever for thickness adjustment. I would first clean the print
    head and store paper flat if you don't already do that.

    There is a technique for cleaning under the print head of the Epson printers
    that is included in Art Entlich's instructions for cleaning Epson print
    heads. Send him an email at artistic@telus.net and request his
    information on Epson print head cleaning. I had an Epson Stylus 900 that
    had occasional head blockages and his instructions were the best for
    restoring it to like new function.

    For some great information on printers, canon printers, aftermarket inks,
    etc, go on to Neil Slades site. The link is
    http://www.neilslade.com/papers/inkjetstuff.html . At his suggestion I
    bought the I960 and really like it. I also took his advice on third party
    inks and have been very pleased. Taliesyn also uses third party inks very
    successfully.

    "Engelkott" <nomail@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:kgjr31tdrv79abc14elvin5hjsn83h5csh@4ax.com...
    >
    > Just another thought, could it be paper thickness too? I have never
    > adjusted the lever on the side for paper thickness so maybe if i move
    > that it would help?
    >
    > Cheers!
    >
    >
    >
  7. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Burt wrote:

    > Taliesyn is on target with the paper curl issue. Canon support has an faq
    > that deals with this problem and has the fix that Taliesyn suggests. I have
    > a canon i960 and had a similar problem. I found that when I left photo
    > glossy paper in the printer feed area over a period of time it took a slight
    > curve and caused the problem. I now store my paper flat in a drawer and
    > only load it onto the feed area when I am printing. I remove what is left
    > after a print session and put it back in the flat storage area in my desk.
    > On the Canon there is a software adjustment for thicker paper and it works
    > well. It is a nuisance as there is a pop-up box that appears with each
    > print you do to verify the thicker paper function.

    That's absolutely good advice of not storing photo paper in the printer
    as it tends to curl even more. I too store it flat elsewhere and insert
    it only at the moment of printing.... or right after the printer tells
    me via a pop-up that I haven't inserted a paper in the machine ;-).

    Funny, I've never seen this paper thickness adjustment option for the
    Canon. Where and when does it appear? I was just looking for it for
    my iP5000 and i860 and failed to find it.

    -Taliesyn
    __________________________________________________________
    The Taliesyn Website: http://www.colba.net/~andresk
  8. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    >
    >Just the way it feeds, I guess. Yes, those corners are the most
    >important parts. I have actually had this happen on slightly
    >curled at the edges coated paper on my Canons (iP5000 and i860).
    >After a few black stained ones I got the message that the printers
    >didn't like their pages curled. :-(
    >
    >> Cheers!
    >>
    >> Engelkott
    >
    >Cheers to you too, and may all your pages remain flat!
    >
    >-Taliesyn
    >__________________________________________________________
    >The Taliesyn Website: http://www.colba.net/~andresk

    I have been considering getting a Canon to go with my Canon cameras
    and scanner. I like the 900 series, is there a printer you would
    reccomend i take a look at?

    Cheers again! :)

    Engelkott
  9. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Engelkott wrote:

    >>Just the way it feeds, I guess. Yes, those corners are the most
    >>important parts. I have actually had this happen on slightly
    >>curled at the edges coated paper on my Canons (iP5000 and i860).
    >>After a few black stained ones I got the message that the printers
    >>didn't like their pages curled. :-(
    >>
    >>
    >>>Cheers!
    >>>
    >>>Engelkott
    >>
    >>Cheers to you too, and may all your pages remain flat!
    >>
    >>-Taliesyn
    >>__________________________________________________________
    >>The Taliesyn Website: http://www.colba.net/~andresk
    >
    >
    > I have been considering getting a Canon to go with my Canon cameras
    > and scanner. I like the 900 series, is there a printer you would
    > reccomend i take a look at?
    >

    I don't like recommending because printers sometimes break down suddenly
    and I don't want to look the bad guy. But I use an i860 and the recent
    iP5000. I was supposed to get the lesser iP4000 but my store didn't have
    any. The difference was $50 (CDN), I said go for it. It uses the same
    cartridge alignment as the i860 and prints gorgeous photos, and works
    flawlessly. The main technical difference is that the iP5000 prints with
    smaller ink droplets than the iP4000, and a resolution of 9600 vs 4800.
    I find prints with the iP5000 don't show the very faint head pass lines
    (visible on SOME photos) that I can spot on my i860 when the finished
    photo is turned 90 degrees. I believe I read somewhere that it was a
    fault of the feed mechanism. Can't say for sure.

    -Taliesyn
    __________________________________________________________
    The Taliesyn Website: http://www.colba.net/~andresk
  10. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Either the discontinued i960 or the IP4000.

    Engelkott wrote:

    >>Just the way it feeds, I guess. Yes, those corners are the most
    >>important parts. I have actually had this happen on slightly
    >>curled at the edges coated paper on my Canons (iP5000 and i860).
    >>After a few black stained ones I got the message that the printers
    >>didn't like their pages curled. :-(
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>>Cheers!
    >>>
    >>>Engelkott
    >>>
    >>>
    >>Cheers to you too, and may all your pages remain flat!
    >>
    >>-Taliesyn
    >>__________________________________________________________
    >>The Taliesyn Website: http://www.colba.net/~andresk
    >>
    >>
    >
    >I have been considering getting a Canon to go with my Canon cameras
    >and scanner. I like the 900 series, is there a printer you would
    >reccomend i take a look at?
    >
    >Cheers again! :)
    >
    >Engelkott
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
  11. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    On Sun, 20 Mar 2005 15:18:47 -0500, Taliesyn <taliesyn4@netscape.net>
    wrote:

    >Burt wrote:
    >
    >> Taliesyn is on target with the paper curl issue. Canon support has an faq
    >> that deals with this problem and has the fix that Taliesyn suggests. I have
    >> a canon i960 and had a similar problem. I found that when I left photo
    >> glossy paper in the printer feed area over a period of time it took a slight
    >> curve and caused the problem. I now store my paper flat in a drawer and
    >> only load it onto the feed area when I am printing. I remove what is left
    >> after a print session and put it back in the flat storage area in my desk.
    >> On the Canon there is a software adjustment for thicker paper and it works
    >> well. It is a nuisance as there is a pop-up box that appears with each
    >> print you do to verify the thicker paper function.
    >
    >That's absolutely good advice of not storing photo paper in the printer
    >as it tends to curl even more. I too store it flat elsewhere and insert
    >it only at the moment of printing.... or right after the printer tells
    >me via a pop-up that I haven't inserted a paper in the machine ;-).
    >
    >Funny, I've never seen this paper thickness adjustment option for the
    >Canon. Where and when does it appear? I was just looking for it for
    >my iP5000 and i860 and failed to find it.
    >
    >-Taliesyn
    >__________________________________________________________
    >The Taliesyn Website: http://www.colba.net/~andresk

    Thanks for the storage tip.

    The paper thickness adjuster is a little lever under the cover where
    the cartridges live. It moves the roller up and down slightly but i am
    not sure if it moves the print head too.

    Engelkott
  12. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Engelkott wrote:

    > On Sun, 20 Mar 2005 15:18:47 -0500, Taliesyn <taliesyn4@netscape.net>
    > wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Burt wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>Taliesyn is on target with the paper curl issue. Canon support has an faq
    >>>that deals with this problem and has the fix that Taliesyn suggests. I have
    >>>a canon i960 and had a similar problem. I found that when I left photo
    >>>glossy paper in the printer feed area over a period of time it took a slight
    >>>curve and caused the problem. I now store my paper flat in a drawer and
    >>>only load it onto the feed area when I am printing. I remove what is left
    >>>after a print session and put it back in the flat storage area in my desk.
    >>>On the Canon there is a software adjustment for thicker paper and it works
    >>>well. It is a nuisance as there is a pop-up box that appears with each
    >>>print you do to verify the thicker paper function.
    >>
    >>That's absolutely good advice of not storing photo paper in the printer
    >>as it tends to curl even more. I too store it flat elsewhere and insert
    >>it only at the moment of printing.... or right after the printer tells
    >>me via a pop-up that I haven't inserted a paper in the machine ;-).
    >>
    >>Funny, I've never seen this paper thickness adjustment option for the
    >>Canon. Where and when does it appear? I was just looking for it for
    >>my iP5000 and i860 and failed to find it.
    >>
    >>-Taliesyn
    >>__________________________________________________________
    >>The Taliesyn Website: http://www.colba.net/~andresk
    >
    >
    > Thanks for the storage tip.
    >
    > The paper thickness adjuster is a little lever under the cover where
    > the cartridges live. It moves the roller up and down slightly but i am
    > not sure if it moves the print head too.
    >

    You mean on your Epson. I don't think the newer Canons have such
    a lever. I think my earlier i850 had a lever and then it magically
    disappeared on the i860. And I've never bothered with thickness
    ever again - envelopes, thin paper, thick paper - all treated the
    same.

    -Taliesyn
    __________________________________________________________
    The Taliesyn Website: http://www.colba.net/~andresk
  13. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    On Sun, 20 Mar 2005 19:47:19 GMT, "Burt" <sfbjgNOSPAM@pacbell.net>
    wrote:

    >Taliesyn is on target with the paper curl issue. Canon support has an faq
    >that deals with this problem and has the fix that Taliesyn suggests. I have
    >a canon i960 and had a similar problem. I found that when I left photo
    >glossy paper in the printer feed area over a period of time it took a slight
    >curve and caused the problem. I now store my paper flat in a drawer and
    >only load it onto the feed area when I am printing. I remove what is left
    >after a print session and put it back in the flat storage area in my desk.
    >On the Canon there is a software adjustment for thicker paper and it works
    >well. It is a nuisance as there is a pop-up box that appears with each
    >print you do to verify the thicker paper function. On the Epson I had there
    >was simply a lever for thickness adjustment. I would first clean the print
    >head and store paper flat if you don't already do that.
    >
    >There is a technique for cleaning under the print head of the Epson printers
    >that is included in Art Entlich's instructions for cleaning Epson print
    >heads. Send him an email at artistic@telus.net and request his
    >information on Epson print head cleaning. I had an Epson Stylus 900 that
    >had occasional head blockages and his instructions were the best for
    >restoring it to like new function.
    >
    >For some great information on printers, canon printers, aftermarket inks,
    >etc, go on to Neil Slades site. The link is
    >http://www.neilslade.com/papers/inkjetstuff.html . At his suggestion I
    >bought the I960 and really like it. I also took his advice on third party
    >inks and have been very pleased. Taliesyn also uses third party inks very
    >successfully.

    Thanks for all your advice. It is appreciated!

    Engelkott
  14. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Taliesyn - check out your printer driver software. For the i960 you click
    the maintenance tab, custom settings, and activate "prevent paper abrasion."
    I guess that this increases the paper feed gap slightly. It did work, but
    as I mentioned in my previous post to this thread, there is a dialogue box
    that pops up for each print. It was much easier to store the paper
    properly! At the same time I also ran into a problem with 4x6 borderless
    printing of banding on the last 3/8 inch of the trailing edge of the
    picture. Same problem of paper curl.

    "Taliesyn" <taliesyn4@netscape.net> wrote in message
    news:3a644tF688o1uU1@individual.net...
    > Burt wrote:
    >
    >> Taliesyn is on target with the paper curl issue. Canon support has an
    >> faq that deals with this problem and has the fix that Taliesyn suggests.
    >> I have a canon i960 and had a similar problem. I found that when I left
    >> photo glossy paper in the printer feed area over a period of time it took
    >> a slight curve and caused the problem. I now store my paper flat in a
    >> drawer and only load it onto the feed area when I am printing. I remove
    >> what is left after a print session and put it back in the flat storage
    >> area in my desk. On the Canon there is a software adjustment for thicker
    >> paper and it works well. It is a nuisance as there is a pop-up box that
    >> appears with each print you do to verify the thicker paper function.
    >
    > That's absolutely good advice of not storing photo paper in the printer
    > as it tends to curl even more. I too store it flat elsewhere and insert
    > it only at the moment of printing.... or right after the printer tells
    > me via a pop-up that I haven't inserted a paper in the machine ;-).
    >
    > Funny, I've never seen this paper thickness adjustment option for the
    > Canon. Where and when does it appear? I was just looking for it for
    > my iP5000 and i860 and failed to find it.
    >
    > -Taliesyn
    > __________________________________________________________
    > The Taliesyn Website: http://www.colba.net/~andresk
  15. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Burt wrote:
    > Taliesyn - check out your printer driver software. For the i960 you click
    > the maintenance tab, custom settings, and activate "prevent paper abrasion."
    > I guess that this increases the paper feed gap slightly. It did work, but
    > as I mentioned in my previous post to this thread, there is a dialogue box
    > that pops up for each print. It was much easier to store the paper
    > properly! At the same time I also ran into a problem with 4x6 borderless
    > printing of banding on the last 3/8 inch of the trailing edge of the
    > picture. Same problem of paper curl.
    >

    Thanks. I have seen that "Prevent Paper Abrasion" check box, but
    couldn't figure out what that meant. Perhaps had they called it
    "Increase paper to printhead gap" it might have meant something.

    About the banding, I found this at a website... "The banding problem (on
    the printed side) is reduced with the Post-It note (Have a look at the
    US Canon service site)".

    I should check this out at the US Canon site too as I have seen banding
    on my i860 prints in the last inch area of some photographs. I don't
    know specifically which printers are involved. So far I haven't
    noticed any problems on my iP5000.

    -Taliesyn
  16. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    On Sun, 20 Mar 2005 20:27:40 +0100, Engelkott <nomail@hotmail.com>
    wrote:


    >I have been considering getting a Canon to go with my Canon cameras
    >and scanner. I like the 900 series, is there a printer you would
    >reccomend i take a look at?
    >
    >Cheers again! :)
    >
    That depends - do you want to keep your prints for any length of time?

    --

    Hecate - The Real One
    Hecate@newsguy.com
    Fashion: Buying things you don't need, with money
    you don't have, to impress people you don't like...
  17. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Burt wrote:

    >Taliesyn - check out your printer driver software. For the i960 you click
    >the maintenance tab, custom settings, and activate "prevent paper abrasion."
    >
    >
    The IP Pixma software is the same for this choice.

    >I guess that this increases the paper feed gap slightly. It did work, but
    >as I mentioned in my previous post to this thread, there is a dialogue box
    >that pops up for each print. It was much easier to store the paper
    >properly! At the same time I also ran into a problem with 4x6 borderless
    >printing of banding on the last 3/8 inch of the trailing edge of the
    >picture. Same problem of paper curl.
    >
    >"Taliesyn" <taliesyn4@netscape.net> wrote in message
    >news:3a644tF688o1uU1@individual.net...
    >
    >
    >>Burt wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>>Taliesyn is on target with the paper curl issue. Canon support has an
    >>>faq that deals with this problem and has the fix that Taliesyn suggests.
    >>>I have a canon i960 and had a similar problem. I found that when I left
    >>>photo glossy paper in the printer feed area over a period of time it took
    >>>a slight curve and caused the problem. I now store my paper flat in a
    >>>drawer and only load it onto the feed area when I am printing. I remove
    >>>what is left after a print session and put it back in the flat storage
    >>>area in my desk. On the Canon there is a software adjustment for thicker
    >>>paper and it works well. It is a nuisance as there is a pop-up box that
    >>>appears with each print you do to verify the thicker paper function.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>That's absolutely good advice of not storing photo paper in the printer
    >>as it tends to curl even more. I too store it flat elsewhere and insert
    >>it only at the moment of printing.... or right after the printer tells
    >>me via a pop-up that I haven't inserted a paper in the machine ;-).
    >>
    >>Funny, I've never seen this paper thickness adjustment option for the
    >>Canon. Where and when does it appear? I was just looking for it for
    >>my iP5000 and i860 and failed to find it.
    >>
    >>-Taliesyn
    >>__________________________________________________________
    >>The Taliesyn Website: http://www.colba.net/~andresk
    >>
    >>
    >
    >
    >
    >
  18. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    >You mean on your Epson. I don't think the newer Canons have such
    >a lever. I think my earlier i850 had a lever and then it magically
    >disappeared on the i860. And I've never bothered with thickness
    >ever again - envelopes, thin paper, thick paper - all treated the
    >same.
    >
    >-Taliesyn
    >__________________________________________________________
    >The Taliesyn Website: http://www.colba.net/~andresk

    I have never bothered to adjust the lever before but with the problem
    i have been having it might be a solution as the paper is 250gsm. The
    paper i print letters on is Epson 80gsm.

    Engelkott
  19. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Engelkott wrote:
    >>You mean on your Epson. I don't think the newer Canons have such
    >>a lever. I think my earlier i850 had a lever and then it magically
    >>disappeared on the i860. And I've never bothered with thickness
    >>ever again - envelopes, thin paper, thick paper - all treated the
    >>same.
    >>
    >>-Taliesyn
    >>__________________________________________________________
    >>The Taliesyn Website: http://www.colba.net/~andresk
    >
    >
    > I have never bothered to adjust the lever before but with the problem
    > i have been having it might be a solution as the paper is 250gsm. The
    > paper i print letters on is Epson 80gsm.
    >
    > Engelkott
    >

    250gsm? Is that the same as 250g/m2? I'm more used to the lbs thingy.

    My Costco Kirkland photo paper is labeled 68lb 260 g/m2 / 10 mil. This
    is very nice thick stuff, with a hard, almost glass-like finish. Okay,
    I exaggerate a little. But it's wonderful paper and it works just fine
    in my Canons with no paper thickness adjustments necessary. There have
    never been any stray ink marks on them. They come 8.5 x 11, but I just
    "Edward Scissorhand" them down to 4 x 6 size for photos. I use a mela-
    mine cutting surface, an exacto knife (from the dollar store), a metal
    ruler, and the comparative method to cut them to size. Comparative met-
    hod means I simply use a scrap 4 x 6 (or longer the better) photo as a
    measuring guide. Usually I just cut them to the 4 inch width, leaving
    the length 8.5 inches, or whatever. Then after the photo is printed, I
    just trim off the excess from the length. Very simple. As this paper is
    instant dry, I don't have to worry about handling it right away.

    -Taliesyn
  20. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    On Mon, 21 Mar 2005 00:19:16 +0000, Hecate <hecate@newsguy.com> wrote:

    >On Sun, 20 Mar 2005 20:27:40 +0100, Engelkott <nomail@hotmail.com>
    >wrote:
    >
    >
    >>I have been considering getting a Canon to go with my Canon cameras
    >>and scanner. I like the 900 series, is there a printer you would
    >>reccomend i take a look at?
    >>
    >>Cheers again! :)
    >>
    >That depends - do you want to keep your prints for any length of time?

    No, not for long. If i print anything to frame i use a pro lab s i
    still prefer the finish you get from a lab and besides that the costs
    are not too bad.

    I will mainly be using it to print things for other people or to make
    walled portfolio snaps. The credit card holder size pics but they are
    rotated every once in a while.

    Engelkott
  21. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Taliesyn - If you print any kind of volume of 4x6's do yourself the favor of
    buying a paper cutter with an adjustable guide bar. Much easier and faster
    and you can cut a box of Kirkland paper into 375 4x6's in around half an
    hour. one of the reasons I went from my Epson Stylus 900 to the canon i960
    was the borderless 4x6 print capability that saved me endless hours of
    trimming!

    "Taliesyn" <taliesyn4@netscape.net> wrote in message
    news:3a72tgF68th95U1@individual.net...
    > Engelkott wrote:
    >>>You mean on your Epson. I don't think the newer Canons have such
    >>>a lever. I think my earlier i850 had a lever and then it magically
    >>>disappeared on the i860. And I've never bothered with thickness
    >>>ever again - envelopes, thin paper, thick paper - all treated the
    >>>same.
    >>>
    >>>-Taliesyn
    >>>__________________________________________________________
    >>>The Taliesyn Website: http://www.colba.net/~andresk
    >>
    >>
    >> I have never bothered to adjust the lever before but with the problem
    >> i have been having it might be a solution as the paper is 250gsm. The
    >> paper i print letters on is Epson 80gsm.
    >>
    >> Engelkott
    >>
    >
    > 250gsm? Is that the same as 250g/m2? I'm more used to the lbs thingy.
    >
    > My Costco Kirkland photo paper is labeled 68lb 260 g/m2 / 10 mil. This
    > is very nice thick stuff, with a hard, almost glass-like finish. Okay,
    > I exaggerate a little. But it's wonderful paper and it works just fine
    > in my Canons with no paper thickness adjustments necessary. There have
    > never been any stray ink marks on them. They come 8.5 x 11, but I just
    > "Edward Scissorhand" them down to 4 x 6 size for photos. I use a mela-
    > mine cutting surface, an exacto knife (from the dollar store), a metal
    > ruler, and the comparative method to cut them to size. Comparative met-
    > hod means I simply use a scrap 4 x 6 (or longer the better) photo as a
    > measuring guide. Usually I just cut them to the 4 inch width, leaving
    > the length 8.5 inches, or whatever. Then after the photo is printed, I
    > just trim off the excess from the length. Very simple. As this paper is
    > instant dry, I don't have to worry about handling it right away.
    >
    > -Taliesyn
  22. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    If you can scan the defect at 300 dpi (not the full page, just the
    defect and about 1" to either side) and jpeg it at high quality, and
    send me it as an attachment privately, I will try to diagnose it and let
    you know what is the likely cause and possible solution.

    Use the email address I have posted this from.

    Art

    Engelkott wrote:

    >
    > Hi!
    >
    > I have an Epson 890 Photo which i am having problems with. Each time i
    > print an A4 sheet of pictures (contact sheet) the printer dumps a line
    > of black ink across the page (roughly 2cm into the print) which then
    > gets dragged all down the page and ruins the rest of the pictures.
    >
    > The ink dunped appears not to be a printed line because it is dragged
    > or smudged so it appears to be blobs of ink.
    >
    > If i print a letter or anything else all is well. This is naturally
    > very frustrating and have grown tired of banging my head on the wall.
    >
    > Thanks for any suggestions.
    >
    > Engelkott
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
  23. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Chances are you have a problem with both dried ink and dust or even a
    hair under the head, as Taliesyn suggests, but I wanted to see the exact
    problem before making a diagnosis, because some descriptions I get are
    not clear enough to define the problem.

    Try raising the head with the paper thickness lever and see if the
    problem still occurs, or is lessened. The fact that the line is as
    defined as you suggest may mean there is something else up as well.

    If you send me a private email requesting the Epson Cleaning Manual, I
    will send you a copy. It explains a safe procedure to clean under the
    heads. There is no cost for it, and no spam.

    I still suggest you send me a scan of the defect so I have more
    information to go on.

    Art


    Engelkott wrote:

    >>I'm not an Epson expert. But I don't I need be in this case. . . .
    >>
    >>Something as simple as a slightly curled sheet - and photo papers
    >>can be notoriously curly - can do this by inadvertently making contact
    >>with the print head as it passes overhead. Remember the gap between
    >>the print head and the paper is very SMALL. The underneaths of print
    >>heads always carry patches of old ink. Try to straighten the paper
    >>as much as possible so that it is almost perfectly flat, so that
    >>no part of it will be "high enough" to strike the print head. Or if
    >>necessary, curve it slightly by hand to the shape of the paper path.
    >>I have had this happen myself with various papers. Remember, you had
    >>stated that it doesn't do this with normal text printing. Good luck!
    >>
    >>-Taliesyn
    >>__________________________________________________________
    >>The Taliesyn Website: http://www.colba.net/~andresk
    >
    >
    > Thanks for the reply! What you have said makes perfect sense now you
    > have said it! :) The corners of the paper do curl up slightly so i
    > will try to straighten them. The paper in question was Ilford Satin
    > paper.
    >
    > One question i have though is why does it take 2cm to deposit the ink
    > across the page and not straight away?
    >
    > Cheers!
    >
    > Engelkott
    >
    >
  24. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Burt wrote:

    > Taliesyn - If you print any kind of volume of 4x6's do yourself the favor of
    > buying a paper cutter with an adjustable guide bar. Much easier and faster
    > and you can cut a box of Kirkland paper into 375 4x6's in around half an
    > hour. one of the reasons I went from my Epson Stylus 900 to the canon i960
    > was the borderless 4x6 print capability that saved me endless hours of
    > trimming!
    >

    Yeah, a cutter's good. The main reason I don't use one is that I don't
    have large runs of photos where I need to cut a lot of them. My efforts
    are more in the range of 1-4 at a time. And cutting a full sheet into
    3 photos takes me under a minute. Also, I'd like to preserve the full
    size sheets in case I do 5 x 7s or larger. I can see the point if I
    was to go on vacation and return with 300 shots. Yeah, I'd use a cutter.

    -Taliesyn (yes, I know the website below shows a Christmas creation,
    but I'm too busy at the moment to update)
    __________________________________________________________
    The Taliesyn Website: http://www.colba.net/~andresk
  25. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    The paper you speak of (Kirkland /Costco), I'm guessing is made by
    Konica. They have a paper was called Konica QC which was actually
    coated with a ceramic coating and it does look like glass. They now
    state it is resin coated, so maybe its been changed. I've been looking
    for a cheaper source for it, as I really like it with my Epsons. It
    apparently is microporous technology, meaning it is not as permanent
    with dye inks as a swellable polymer might be, but it usually is water
    proof once it dries, and the surface, when one is after that mirror
    gloss, is just beautiful. I'm going to have to track this down... I
    hope they have it in Western Canada. Office Depot brand paper in the US
    seems to be Konica Premium Glossy, but not in Canada.

    The specs seem correct from what you've stated:

    See:

    http://bt.konicaminolta.ca/products/consumer/paper/inkjet/glossy.html

    Art


    Taliesyn wrote:

    > Engelkott wrote:
    >
    >>> You mean on your Epson. I don't think the newer Canons have such
    >>> a lever. I think my earlier i850 had a lever and then it magically
    >>> disappeared on the i860. And I've never bothered with thickness
    >>> ever again - envelopes, thin paper, thick paper - all treated the
    >>> same.
    >>>
    >>> -Taliesyn
    >>> __________________________________________________________
    >>> The Taliesyn Website: http://www.colba.net/~andresk
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> I have never bothered to adjust the lever before but with the problem
    >> i have been having it might be a solution as the paper is 250gsm. The
    >> paper i print letters on is Epson 80gsm.
    >>
    >> Engelkott
    >>
    >
    > 250gsm? Is that the same as 250g/m2? I'm more used to the lbs thingy.
    >
    > My Costco Kirkland photo paper is labeled 68lb 260 g/m2 / 10 mil. This
    > is very nice thick stuff, with a hard, almost glass-like finish. Okay,
    > I exaggerate a little. But it's wonderful paper and it works just fine
    > in my Canons with no paper thickness adjustments necessary. There have
    > never been any stray ink marks on them. They come 8.5 x 11, but I just
    > "Edward Scissorhand" them down to 4 x 6 size for photos. I use a mela-
    > mine cutting surface, an exacto knife (from the dollar store), a metal
    > ruler, and the comparative method to cut them to size. Comparative met-
    > hod means I simply use a scrap 4 x 6 (or longer the better) photo as a
    > measuring guide. Usually I just cut them to the 4 inch width, leaving
    > the length 8.5 inches, or whatever. Then after the photo is printed, I
    > just trim off the excess from the length. Very simple. As this paper is
    > instant dry, I don't have to worry about handling it right away.
    >
    > -Taliesyn
  26. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Arthur Entlich wrote:

    > The paper you speak of (Kirkland /Costco), I'm guessing is made by
    > Konica.

    That is in the past. Made in Switzerland, word has it that it is Ilford
    Gallerie Glossy. I would suggest you get a package $20 for 120 8.5x11
    sheets. Then go get a package of Ilford Gallerie Glossy at
    www.inksupply.com . Compare and let us know what you think.

    > They have a paper was called Konica QC which was actually coated with
    > a ceramic coating and it does look like glass. They now state it is
    > resin coated, so maybe its been changed. I've been looking for a
    > cheaper source for it, as I really like it with my Epsons. It
    > apparently is microporous technology, meaning it is not as permanent
    > with dye inks as a swellable polymer might be, but it usually is water
    > proof once it dries, and the surface, when one is after that mirror
    > gloss, is just beautiful. I'm going to have to track this down... I
    > hope they have it in Western Canada. Office Depot brand paper in the
    > US seems to be Konica Premium Glossy, but not in Canada.
    >
    > The specs seem correct from what you've stated:
    >
    > See:
    >
    > http://bt.konicaminolta.ca/products/consumer/paper/inkjet/glossy.html
    >
    > Art
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > Taliesyn wrote:
    >
    >> Engelkott wrote:
    >>
    >>>> You mean on your Epson. I don't think the newer Canons have such
    >>>> a lever. I think my earlier i850 had a lever and then it magically
    >>>> disappeared on the i860. And I've never bothered with thickness
    >>>> ever again - envelopes, thin paper, thick paper - all treated the
    >>>> same.
    >>>>
    >>>> -Taliesyn
    >>>> __________________________________________________________
    >>>> The Taliesyn Website: http://www.colba.net/~andresk
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> I have never bothered to adjust the lever before but with the problem
    >>> i have been having it might be a solution as the paper is 250gsm. The
    >>> paper i print letters on is Epson 80gsm.
    >>>
    >>> Engelkott
    >>>
    >>
    >> 250gsm? Is that the same as 250g/m2? I'm more used to the lbs thingy.
    >>
    >> My Costco Kirkland photo paper is labeled 68lb 260 g/m2 / 10 mil. This
    >> is very nice thick stuff, with a hard, almost glass-like finish. Okay,
    >> I exaggerate a little. But it's wonderful paper and it works just fine
    >> in my Canons with no paper thickness adjustments necessary. There have
    >> never been any stray ink marks on them. They come 8.5 x 11, but I just
    >> "Edward Scissorhand" them down to 4 x 6 size for photos. I use a mela-
    >> mine cutting surface, an exacto knife (from the dollar store), a metal
    >> ruler, and the comparative method to cut them to size. Comparative met-
    >> hod means I simply use a scrap 4 x 6 (or longer the better) photo as a
    >> measuring guide. Usually I just cut them to the 4 inch width, leaving
    >> the length 8.5 inches, or whatever. Then after the photo is printed, I
    >> just trim off the excess from the length. Very simple. As this paper is
    >> instant dry, I don't have to worry about handling it right away.
    >>
    >> -Taliesyn
    >
  27. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Arthur -- the Costco store in Richmond has it ($24.00 for 120 8.5X11
    sheets), don't know about other Vancouver Costco stores.
    rtm
    "Arthur Entlich" <artistic@telus.net> wrote in message
    news:q9x%d.53792$ZO2.37290@edtnps84...
    > The paper you speak of (Kirkland /Costco), I'm guessing is made by Konica.
    > They have a paper was called Konica QC which was actually coated with a
    > ceramic coating and it does look like glass. They now state it is resin
    > coated, so maybe its been changed. I've been looking for a cheaper source
    > for it, as I really like it with my Epsons. It apparently is microporous
    > technology, meaning it is not as permanent with dye inks as a swellable
    > polymer might be, but it usually is water proof once it dries, and the
    > surface, when one is after that mirror gloss, is just beautiful. I'm
    > going to have to track this down... I hope they have it in Western Canada.
    > Office Depot brand paper in the US seems to be Konica Premium Glossy, but
    > not in Canada.
    >
    > The specs seem correct from what you've stated:
    >
    > See:
    >
    > http://bt.konicaminolta.ca/products/consumer/paper/inkjet/glossy.html
    >
    > Art
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > Taliesyn wrote:
    >
    >> Engelkott wrote:
    >>
    >>>> You mean on your Epson. I don't think the newer Canons have such
    >>>> a lever. I think my earlier i850 had a lever and then it magically
    >>>> disappeared on the i860. And I've never bothered with thickness
    >>>> ever again - envelopes, thin paper, thick paper - all treated the
    >>>> same.
    >>>>
    >>>> -Taliesyn
    >>>> __________________________________________________________
    >>>> The Taliesyn Website: http://www.colba.net/~andresk
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> I have never bothered to adjust the lever before but with the problem
    >>> i have been having it might be a solution as the paper is 250gsm. The
    >>> paper i print letters on is Epson 80gsm.
    >>>
    >>> Engelkott
    >>>
    >>
    >> 250gsm? Is that the same as 250g/m2? I'm more used to the lbs thingy.
    >>
    >> My Costco Kirkland photo paper is labeled 68lb 260 g/m2 / 10 mil. This
    >> is very nice thick stuff, with a hard, almost glass-like finish. Okay,
    >> I exaggerate a little. But it's wonderful paper and it works just fine
    >> in my Canons with no paper thickness adjustments necessary. There have
    >> never been any stray ink marks on them. They come 8.5 x 11, but I just
    >> "Edward Scissorhand" them down to 4 x 6 size for photos. I use a mela-
    >> mine cutting surface, an exacto knife (from the dollar store), a metal
    >> ruler, and the comparative method to cut them to size. Comparative met-
    >> hod means I simply use a scrap 4 x 6 (or longer the better) photo as a
    >> measuring guide. Usually I just cut them to the 4 inch width, leaving
    >> the length 8.5 inches, or whatever. Then after the photo is printed, I
    >> just trim off the excess from the length. Very simple. As this paper is
    >> instant dry, I don't have to worry about handling it right away.
    >>
    >> -Taliesyn
  28. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Robert wrote:

    >Arthur -- the Costco store in Richmond has it ($24.00 for 120 8.5X11
    >sheets), don't know about other Vancouver Costco stores.
    >
    >
    Los Angeles at $19.95

    >rtm
    >"Arthur Entlich" <artistic@telus.net> wrote in message
    >news:q9x%d.53792$ZO2.37290@edtnps84...
    >
    >
    >>The paper you speak of (Kirkland /Costco), I'm guessing is made by Konica.
    >>They have a paper was called Konica QC which was actually coated with a
    >>ceramic coating and it does look like glass. They now state it is resin
    >>coated, so maybe its been changed. I've been looking for a cheaper source
    >>for it, as I really like it with my Epsons. It apparently is microporous
    >>technology, meaning it is not as permanent with dye inks as a swellable
    >>polymer might be, but it usually is water proof once it dries, and the
    >>surface, when one is after that mirror gloss, is just beautiful. I'm
    >>going to have to track this down... I hope they have it in Western Canada.
    >>Office Depot brand paper in the US seems to be Konica Premium Glossy, but
    >>not in Canada.
    >>
    >>The specs seem correct from what you've stated:
    >>
    >>See:
    >>
    >>http://bt.konicaminolta.ca/products/consumer/paper/inkjet/glossy.html
    >>
    >>Art
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>Taliesyn wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>>Engelkott wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>>You mean on your Epson. I don't think the newer Canons have such
    >>>>>a lever. I think my earlier i850 had a lever and then it magically
    >>>>>disappeared on the i860. And I've never bothered with thickness
    >>>>>ever again - envelopes, thin paper, thick paper - all treated the
    >>>>>same.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>-Taliesyn
    >>>>>__________________________________________________________
    >>>>>The Taliesyn Website: http://www.colba.net/~andresk
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>I have never bothered to adjust the lever before but with the problem
    >>>>i have been having it might be a solution as the paper is 250gsm. The
    >>>>paper i print letters on is Epson 80gsm.
    >>>>
    >>>>Engelkott
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>250gsm? Is that the same as 250g/m2? I'm more used to the lbs thingy.
    >>>
    >>>My Costco Kirkland photo paper is labeled 68lb 260 g/m2 / 10 mil. This
    >>>is very nice thick stuff, with a hard, almost glass-like finish. Okay,
    >>>I exaggerate a little. But it's wonderful paper and it works just fine
    >>>in my Canons with no paper thickness adjustments necessary. There have
    >>>never been any stray ink marks on them. They come 8.5 x 11, but I just
    >>>"Edward Scissorhand" them down to 4 x 6 size for photos. I use a mela-
    >>>mine cutting surface, an exacto knife (from the dollar store), a metal
    >>>ruler, and the comparative method to cut them to size. Comparative met-
    >>>hod means I simply use a scrap 4 x 6 (or longer the better) photo as a
    >>>measuring guide. Usually I just cut them to the 4 inch width, leaving
    >>>the length 8.5 inches, or whatever. Then after the photo is printed, I
    >>>just trim off the excess from the length. Very simple. As this paper is
    >>>instant dry, I don't have to worry about handling it right away.
    >>>
    >>>-Taliesyn
    >>>
    >>>
    >
    >
    >
    >
  29. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    On Mon, 21 Mar 2005 04:37:06 +0100, Engelkott <nomail@hotmail.com>
    wrote:


    >I will mainly be using it to print things for other people or to make
    >walled portfolio snaps. The credit card holder size pics but they are
    >rotated every once in a while.
    >
    As long as you're not charging - otherwise you're going to have some
    *very* unhappy customers :)

    --

    Hecate - The Real One
    Hecate@newsguy.com
    Fashion: Buying things you don't need, with money
    you don't have, to impress people you don't like...
  30. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    On Mon, 21 Mar 2005 00:03:56 -0500, Taliesyn <taliesyn4@netscape.net>
    wrote:

    >Engelkott wrote:
    >>>You mean on your Epson. I don't think the newer Canons have such
    >>>a lever. I think my earlier i850 had a lever and then it magically
    >>>disappeared on the i860. And I've never bothered with thickness
    >>>ever again - envelopes, thin paper, thick paper - all treated the
    >>>same.
    >>>
    >>>-Taliesyn
    >>>__________________________________________________________
    >>>The Taliesyn Website: http://www.colba.net/~andresk
    >>
    >>
    >> I have never bothered to adjust the lever before but with the problem
    >> i have been having it might be a solution as the paper is 250gsm. The
    >> paper i print letters on is Epson 80gsm.
    >>
    >> Engelkott
    >>
    >
    >250gsm? Is that the same as 250g/m2? I'm more used to the lbs thingy.
    >
    gsm = grams per square metre. I.e modern measurements, not Imperial.
    :)

    --

    Hecate - The Real One
    Hecate@newsguy.com
    Fashion: Buying things you don't need, with money
    you don't have, to impress people you don't like...
  31. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    measekite wrote:

    >
    >
    > Robert wrote:
    >
    >>Arthur -- the Costco store in Richmond has it ($24.00 for 120 8.5X11
    >>sheets), don't know about other Vancouver Costco stores.
    >>
    >>
    > Los Angeles at $19.95
    >
    >
    In other words, about the same price, considering the current exchange rate
    between the Canadian dollar and the US dollar.... :-)

    It sounds like it might be worth a try - I've been looking for something
    that gives a print that looks reasonably close to what I see on the
    monitor.

    Al Preston
  32. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    One heck of a lot of work for making one copy of a home-burned CD.


    Art

    Taliesyn wrote:

    > -Taliesyn (yes, I know the website below shows a Christmas creation,
    > but I'm too busy at the moment to update)
    > __________________________________________________________
    > The Taliesyn Website: http://www.colba.net/~andresk
  33. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Hmm...

    I was just on the Ilford site and I can't find any of their papers that
    quite matches the Kirkland. May be a different product being made by
    Ilford's mills, but strangely the stats are nearly identical to the
    Konica. Maybe Konica is also made in Switzerland now (used to be made
    in Japan)?

    Konica's paper is listed as 260g/m2 10.4 mil super high gloss

    They have another high gloss professional product called Konica QP which
    is 305g/m2, 11.8 mil, but teh one I used last was 10 mil.

    Ilford Gloss Smooth is 280g/m2 10.8 mil 22-28% gloss at 20 degrees
    Ilford Classic Gloss is 240g/m2 9 mil 50-80% gloss at 20 degrees
    Ilford Smoth High Gloss is 235 g/m2, 7 mil 40% gloss at 20 degrees

    I'll take a look at the Kirkland, but I'm really after a nicely
    discounted version of the Konica QP (not QC, that was an error).
    Branded as Konica, it's to costly.

    Art

    measekite wrote:

    >
    >
    > Arthur Entlich wrote:
    >
    >> The paper you speak of (Kirkland /Costco), I'm guessing is made by
    >> Konica.
    >
    >
    > That is in the past. Made in Switzerland, word has it that it is Ilford
    > Gallerie Glossy. I would suggest you get a package $20 for 120 8.5x11
    > sheets. Then go get a package of Ilford Gallerie Glossy at
    > www.inksupply.com . Compare and let us know what you think.
    >
    >> They have a paper was called Konica QC which was actually coated with
    >> a ceramic coating and it does look like glass. They now state it is
    >> resin coated, so maybe its been changed. I've been looking for a
    >> cheaper source for it, as I really like it with my Epsons. It
    >> apparently is microporous technology, meaning it is not as permanent
    >> with dye inks as a swellable polymer might be, but it usually is water
    >> proof once it dries, and the surface, when one is after that mirror
    >> gloss, is just beautiful. I'm going to have to track this down... I
    >> hope they have it in Western Canada. Office Depot brand paper in the
    >> US seems to be Konica Premium Glossy, but not in Canada.
    >>
    >> The specs seem correct from what you've stated:
    >>
    >> See:
    >>
    >> http://bt.konicaminolta.ca/products/consumer/paper/inkjet/glossy.html
    >>
    >> Art
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Taliesyn wrote:
    >>
    >>> Engelkott wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>> You mean on your Epson. I don't think the newer Canons have such
    >>>>> a lever. I think my earlier i850 had a lever and then it magically
    >>>>> disappeared on the i860. And I've never bothered with thickness
    >>>>> ever again - envelopes, thin paper, thick paper - all treated the
    >>>>> same.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> -Taliesyn
    >>>>> __________________________________________________________
    >>>>> The Taliesyn Website: http://www.colba.net/~andresk
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> I have never bothered to adjust the lever before but with the problem
    >>>> i have been having it might be a solution as the paper is 250gsm. The
    >>>> paper i print letters on is Epson 80gsm.
    >>>>
    >>>> Engelkott
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> 250gsm? Is that the same as 250g/m2? I'm more used to the lbs thingy.
    >>>
    >>> My Costco Kirkland photo paper is labeled 68lb 260 g/m2 / 10 mil. This
    >>> is very nice thick stuff, with a hard, almost glass-like finish. Okay,
    >>> I exaggerate a little. But it's wonderful paper and it works just fine
    >>> in my Canons with no paper thickness adjustments necessary. There have
    >>> never been any stray ink marks on them. They come 8.5 x 11, but I just
    >>> "Edward Scissorhand" them down to 4 x 6 size for photos. I use a mela-
    >>> mine cutting surface, an exacto knife (from the dollar store), a metal
    >>> ruler, and the comparative method to cut them to size. Comparative met-
    >>> hod means I simply use a scrap 4 x 6 (or longer the better) photo as a
    >>> measuring guide. Usually I just cut them to the 4 inch width, leaving
    >>> the length 8.5 inches, or whatever. Then after the photo is printed, I
    >>> just trim off the excess from the length. Very simple. As this paper is
    >>> instant dry, I don't have to worry about handling it right away.
    >>>
    >>> -Taliesyn
    >>
    >>
  34. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Thanks for the heads up.

    I'm not a member, but I have some friends who are. I live on Vancouver
    Island, and can see if they are carrying it.

    Art

    Robert wrote:

    > Arthur -- the Costco store in Richmond has it ($24.00 for 120 8.5X11
    > sheets), don't know about other Vancouver Costco stores.
    > rtm
    > "Arthur Entlich" <artistic@telus.net> wrote in message
    > news:q9x%d.53792$ZO2.37290@edtnps84...
    >
    >>The paper you speak of (Kirkland /Costco), I'm guessing is made by Konica.
    >>They have a paper was called Konica QC which was actually coated with a
    >>ceramic coating and it does look like glass. They now state it is resin
    >>coated, so maybe its been changed. I've been looking for a cheaper source
    >>for it, as I really like it with my Epsons. It apparently is microporous
    >>technology, meaning it is not as permanent with dye inks as a swellable
    >>polymer might be, but it usually is water proof once it dries, and the
    >>surface, when one is after that mirror gloss, is just beautiful. I'm
    >>going to have to track this down... I hope they have it in Western Canada.
    >>Office Depot brand paper in the US seems to be Konica Premium Glossy, but
    >>not in Canada.
    >>
    >>The specs seem correct from what you've stated:
    >>
    >>See:
    >>
    >>http://bt.konicaminolta.ca/products/consumer/paper/inkjet/glossy.html
    >>
    >>Art
    >>
    >>
  35. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    That would be just about correct since the Canadian dollar is at about
    ..83 cents to the US $ now.

    Art

    measekite wrote:

    >
    >
    > Robert wrote:
    >
    >> Arthur -- the Costco store in Richmond has it ($24.00 for 120 8.5X11
    >> sheets), don't know about other Vancouver Costco stores.
    >>
    >>
    > Los Angeles at $19.95
    >
    >> rtm
    >> "Arthur Entlich" <artistic@telus.net> wrote in message
    >> news:q9x%d.53792$ZO2.37290@edtnps84...
    >>
    >>
    >
  36. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Arthur Entlich wrote:
    > One heck of a lot of work for making one copy of a home-burned CD.
    >


    All part of my usual "twisted logic", Art. If you're going to buy a high
    quality printer and lots of affordable ink, then you might as well do
    something with it instead of whine (not you, Art) and debate whether
    Canon photos fade in dark drawers in six months. I've chosen the more
    difficult route. I now have 7 "CD & Booklet" projects going back 5
    years. They've been printed on Epson, Lexmark, and now, Canon printers.
    (my astrological advisor doesn't see any HP printers in my lifeline).
    And in all cases, I just checked by creations, they show absolutely no
    evidence of fading.

    And if you entertained any thought at all that I may actually be selling
    my projects... banish it. It takes a full day of printing at the highest
    resolution and then assembling to even make one copy. What would I
    charge if it were legal, $200?? Who'd buy it? Anyone crazy enough to
    still want one would get a polite reply telling them to use their own
    initiative, resources, and most importantly, their own favorite songs
    (not mine). Posting my creations from time to time merely showcases what
    can be done with a little patience, talent... did I mention patience?
    And hopefully gives people ideas for similar projects of their own.

    Art, you are actually the first person to have even commented on the
    Christmas project since it was posted back in early December 2004. It
    seems everyone who has stopped by my website, accidentally or not, has
    read the "small print", in two places I believe, and heeded the message
    that the CD & booklet is not for sale. I thank those people for under-
    standing.

    -Taliesyn (hmmm, now I have TWO Canon printers... what can I create...?)


    >
    > Art
    >
    > Taliesyn wrote:
    >
    >> -Taliesyn (yes, I know the website below shows a Christmas creation,
    >> but I'm too busy at the moment to update)
    >> __________________________________________________________
    >> The Taliesyn Website: http://www.colba.net/~andresk
  37. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    On Tue, 22 Mar 2005 02:23:56 +0000, Hecate <hecate@newsguy.com> wrote:

    >On Mon, 21 Mar 2005 04:37:06 +0100, Engelkott <nomail@hotmail.com>
    >wrote:
    >
    >
    >>I will mainly be using it to print things for other people or to make
    >>walled portfolio snaps. The credit card holder size pics but they are
    >>rotated every once in a while.
    >>
    >As long as you're not charging - otherwise you're going to have some
    >*very* unhappy customers :)

    No, the stuff i print for people is if they do some modelling for me
    then i give them some prints in return plus the files on disc for them
    to get reprinted later.

    It is not my fault if they fade! :)

    Engelkott
  38. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    On Mon, 21 Mar 2005 00:03:56 -0500, Taliesyn <taliesyn4@netscape.net>
    wrote:

    >Engelkott wrote:
    >>>You mean on your Epson. I don't think the newer Canons have such
    >>>a lever. I think my earlier i850 had a lever and then it magically
    >>>disappeared on the i860. And I've never bothered with thickness
    >>>ever again - envelopes, thin paper, thick paper - all treated the
    >>>same.
    >>>
    >>>-Taliesyn
    >>>__________________________________________________________
    >>>The Taliesyn Website: http://www.colba.net/~andresk
    >>
    >>
    >> I have never bothered to adjust the lever before but with the problem
    >> i have been having it might be a solution as the paper is 250gsm. The
    >> paper i print letters on is Epson 80gsm.
    >>
    >> Engelkott
    >>
    >
    >250gsm? Is that the same as 250g/m2? I'm more used to the lbs thingy.

    I am not sure. On the Epson paper they quote it as 255 g/m2 but the
    Fuji and Ilford paper has it as 270 gsm. I would guess it is one and
    the same.

    Engelkott
  39. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    On Mon, 21 Mar 2005 05:36:59 GMT, "Burt" <sfbjgNOSPAM@pacbell.net>
    wrote:

    >Taliesyn - If you print any kind of volume of 4x6's do yourself the favor of
    >buying a paper cutter with an adjustable guide bar. Much easier and faster
    >and you can cut a box of Kirkland paper into 375 4x6's in around half an
    >hour. one of the reasons I went from my Epson Stylus 900 to the canon i960
    >was the borderless 4x6 print capability that saved me endless hours of
    >trimming!

    I thought the Epson 900 had borderles prints? My 890 and my friends
    895 has this function.But then maybe the model numbers do not run
    concurrently?

    Engelkott
  40. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    On Mon, 21 Mar 2005 06:59:56 GMT, Arthur Entlich <artistic@telus.net>
    wrote:

    >If you can scan the defect at 300 dpi (not the full page, just the
    >defect and about 1" to either side) and jpeg it at high quality, and
    >send me it as an attachment privately, I will try to diagnose it and let
    >you know what is the likely cause and possible solution.
    >
    >Use the email address I have posted this from.
    >
    >Art

    Thanks for the offer but i have thrown the page away now. If the
    printer should do it again i fill take you up on your offer. I should
    be doing some printing tonight or tomorrow.

    Thanks again!

    Engelkott
  41. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Art - Someone mentioned in a post that the Kirkland paper was Ilford Pearl.
    The Ilford site shows Pearl as a slightly heavier weight paper. Perhaps
    they use the same coating on a slightly lighter weight paper for the
    discount store sales? Regardless of source, I would suggest you buy a box
    and try it. I must say, however, that I like it better with my Canon i960
    than my old Epson Stylus 900 (which I revived with the help of your
    excellent monograph).

    "Arthur Entlich" <artistic@telus.net> wrote in message
    news:mnR%d.63887$KI2.19876@clgrps12...
    > Hmm...
    >
    > I was just on the Ilford site and I can't find any of their papers that
    > quite matches the Kirkland. May be a different product being made by
    > Ilford's mills, but strangely the stats are nearly identical to the
    > Konica. Maybe Konica is also made in Switzerland now (used to be made in
    > Japan)?
    >
    > Konica's paper is listed as 260g/m2 10.4 mil super high gloss
    >
    > They have another high gloss professional product called Konica QP which
    > is 305g/m2, 11.8 mil, but teh one I used last was 10 mil.
    >
    > Ilford Gloss Smooth is 280g/m2 10.8 mil 22-28% gloss at 20 degrees
    > Ilford Classic Gloss is 240g/m2 9 mil 50-80% gloss at 20 degrees
    > Ilford Smoth High Gloss is 235 g/m2, 7 mil 40% gloss at 20 degrees
    >
    > I'll take a look at the Kirkland, but I'm really after a nicely discounted
    > version of the Konica QP (not QC, that was an error). Branded as Konica,
    > it's to costly.
    >
    > Art
    >
    > measekite wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>
    >> Arthur Entlich wrote:
    >>
    >>> The paper you speak of (Kirkland /Costco), I'm guessing is made by
    >>> Konica.
    >>
    >>
    >> That is in the past. Made in Switzerland, word has it that it is Ilford
    >> Gallerie Glossy. I would suggest you get a package $20 for 120 8.5x11
    >> sheets. Then go get a package of Ilford Gallerie Glossy at
    >> www.inksupply.com . Compare and let us know what you think.
    >>
    >>> They have a paper was called Konica QC which was actually coated with a
    >>> ceramic coating and it does look like glass. They now state it is resin
    >>> coated, so maybe its been changed. I've been looking for a cheaper
    >>> source for it, as I really like it with my Epsons. It apparently is
    >>> microporous technology, meaning it is not as permanent with dye inks as
    >>> a swellable polymer might be, but it usually is water proof once it
    >>> dries, and the surface, when one is after that mirror gloss, is just
    >>> beautiful. I'm going to have to track this down... I hope they have it
    >>> in Western Canada. Office Depot brand paper in the US seems to be
    >>> Konica Premium Glossy, but not in Canada.
    >>>
    >>> The specs seem correct from what you've stated:
    >>>
    >>> See:
    >>>
    >>> http://bt.konicaminolta.ca/products/consumer/paper/inkjet/glossy.html
    >>>
    >>> Art
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Taliesyn wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Engelkott wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>>> You mean on your Epson. I don't think the newer Canons have such
    >>>>>> a lever. I think my earlier i850 had a lever and then it magically
    >>>>>> disappeared on the i860. And I've never bothered with thickness
    >>>>>> ever again - envelopes, thin paper, thick paper - all treated the
    >>>>>> same.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> -Taliesyn
    >>>>>> __________________________________________________________
    >>>>>> The Taliesyn Website: http://www.colba.net/~andresk
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I have never bothered to adjust the lever before but with the problem
    >>>>> i have been having it might be a solution as the paper is 250gsm. The
    >>>>> paper i print letters on is Epson 80gsm.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Engelkott
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> 250gsm? Is that the same as 250g/m2? I'm more used to the lbs thingy.
    >>>>
    >>>> My Costco Kirkland photo paper is labeled 68lb 260 g/m2 / 10 mil. This
    >>>> is very nice thick stuff, with a hard, almost glass-like finish. Okay,
    >>>> I exaggerate a little. But it's wonderful paper and it works just fine
    >>>> in my Canons with no paper thickness adjustments necessary. There have
    >>>> never been any stray ink marks on them. They come 8.5 x 11, but I just
    >>>> "Edward Scissorhand" them down to 4 x 6 size for photos. I use a mela-
    >>>> mine cutting surface, an exacto knife (from the dollar store), a metal
    >>>> ruler, and the comparative method to cut them to size. Comparative met-
    >>>> hod means I simply use a scrap 4 x 6 (or longer the better) photo as a
    >>>> measuring guide. Usually I just cut them to the 4 inch width, leaving
    >>>> the length 8.5 inches, or whatever. Then after the photo is printed, I
    >>>> just trim off the excess from the length. Very simple. As this paper is
    >>>> instant dry, I don't have to worry about handling it right away.
    >>>>
    >>>> -Taliesyn
    >>>
    >>>
  42. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    This was the Epson STYLUS 900. Perhaps the Epson Photo 900 did borderless
    prints, but the Stylus 900 did not.

    "Engelkott" <nomail@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:qntv319iglhmegfr1j9ce1gidtko10pi0s@4ax.com...
    > On Mon, 21 Mar 2005 05:36:59 GMT, "Burt" <sfbjgNOSPAM@pacbell.net>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>Taliesyn - If you print any kind of volume of 4x6's do yourself the favor
    >>of
    >>buying a paper cutter with an adjustable guide bar. Much easier and
    >>faster
    >>and you can cut a box of Kirkland paper into 375 4x6's in around half an
    >>hour. one of the reasons I went from my Epson Stylus 900 to the canon
    >>i960
    >>was the borderless 4x6 print capability that saved me endless hours of
    >>trimming!
    >
    > I thought the Epson 900 had borderles prints? My 890 and my friends
    > 895 has this function.But then maybe the model numbers do not run
    > concurrently?
    >
    > Engelkott
    >
  43. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    I stand by my original statement (below). It didn't imply you were
    selling or making additional copies, and yes, I did read the "fine
    print" on several pages that indicated you do not sell them.

    Art

    Taliesyn wrote:

    > Arthur Entlich wrote:
    >
    >> One heck of a lot of work for making one copy of a home-burned CD.
    >>
    >
    >
    > All part of my usual "twisted logic", Art. If you're going to buy a high
    > quality printer and lots of affordable ink, then you might as well do
    > something with it instead of whine (not you, Art) and debate whether
    > Canon photos fade in dark drawers in six months. I've chosen the more
    > difficult route. I now have 7 "CD & Booklet" projects going back 5
    > years. They've been printed on Epson, Lexmark, and now, Canon printers.
    > (my astrological advisor doesn't see any HP printers in my lifeline).
    > And in all cases, I just checked by creations, they show absolutely no
    > evidence of fading.
    >
    > And if you entertained any thought at all that I may actually be selling
    > my projects... banish it. It takes a full day of printing at the highest
    > resolution and then assembling to even make one copy. What would I
    > charge if it were legal, $200?? Who'd buy it? Anyone crazy enough to
    > still want one would get a polite reply telling them to use their own
    > initiative, resources, and most importantly, their own favorite songs
    > (not mine). Posting my creations from time to time merely showcases what
    > can be done with a little patience, talent... did I mention patience?
    > And hopefully gives people ideas for similar projects of their own.
    >
    > Art, you are actually the first person to have even commented on the
    > Christmas project since it was posted back in early December 2004. It
    > seems everyone who has stopped by my website, accidentally or not, has
    > read the "small print", in two places I believe, and heeded the message
    > that the CD & booklet is not for sale. I thank those people for under-
    > standing.
    >
    > -Taliesyn (hmmm, now I have TWO Canon printers... what can I create...?)
    >
    >
    >>
    >> Art
    >>
    >> Taliesyn wrote:
    >>
    >>> -Taliesyn (yes, I know the website below shows a Christmas creation,
    >>> but I'm too busy at the moment to update)
    >>> __________________________________________________________
    >>> The Taliesyn Website: http://www.colba.net/~andresk
  44. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    I understood the Kirkland paper to be high gloss. I rarely use high
    gloss, but I happened to really like the Konica results with Epson inks,
    so for my portfolio sheets I didn't mind using it.

    Next time I'm in Costco, I'll give it a good look.

    Art

    Burt wrote:

    > Art - Someone mentioned in a post that the Kirkland paper was Ilford Pearl.
    > The Ilford site shows Pearl as a slightly heavier weight paper. Perhaps
    > they use the same coating on a slightly lighter weight paper for the
    > discount store sales? Regardless of source, I would suggest you buy a box
    > and try it. I must say, however, that I like it better with my Canon i960
    > than my old Epson Stylus 900 (which I revived with the help of your
    > excellent monograph).
    >
    > "Arthur Entlich" <artistic@telus.net> wrote in message
    > news:mnR%d.63887$KI2.19876@clgrps12...
    >
    >>Hmm...
    >>
    >>I was just on the Ilford site and I can't find any of their papers that
    >>quite matches the Kirkland. May be a different product being made by
    >>Ilford's mills, but strangely the stats are nearly identical to the
    >>Konica. Maybe Konica is also made in Switzerland now (used to be made in
    >>Japan)?
    >>
    >>Konica's paper is listed as 260g/m2 10.4 mil super high gloss
    >>
    >>They have another high gloss professional product called Konica QP which
    >>is 305g/m2, 11.8 mil, but teh one I used last was 10 mil.
    >>
    >>Ilford Gloss Smooth is 280g/m2 10.8 mil 22-28% gloss at 20 degrees
    >>Ilford Classic Gloss is 240g/m2 9 mil 50-80% gloss at 20 degrees
    >>Ilford Smoth High Gloss is 235 g/m2, 7 mil 40% gloss at 20 degrees
    >>
    >>I'll take a look at the Kirkland, but I'm really after a nicely discounted
    >>version of the Konica QP (not QC, that was an error). Branded as Konica,
    >>it's to costly.
    >>
    >>Art
    >>
    >>measekite wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>
    >>>Arthur Entlich wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>The paper you speak of (Kirkland /Costco), I'm guessing is made by
    >>>>Konica.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>That is in the past. Made in Switzerland, word has it that it is Ilford
    >>>Gallerie Glossy. I would suggest you get a package $20 for 120 8.5x11
    >>>sheets. Then go get a package of Ilford Gallerie Glossy at
    >>>www.inksupply.com . Compare and let us know what you think.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>They have a paper was called Konica QC which was actually coated with a
    >>>>ceramic coating and it does look like glass. They now state it is resin
    >>>>coated, so maybe its been changed. I've been looking for a cheaper
    >>>>source for it, as I really like it with my Epsons. It apparently is
    >>>>microporous technology, meaning it is not as permanent with dye inks as
    >>>>a swellable polymer might be, but it usually is water proof once it
    >>>>dries, and the surface, when one is after that mirror gloss, is just
    >>>>beautiful. I'm going to have to track this down... I hope they have it
    >>>>in Western Canada. Office Depot brand paper in the US seems to be
    >>>>Konica Premium Glossy, but not in Canada.
    >>>>
    >>>>The specs seem correct from what you've stated:
    >>>>
    >>>>See:
    >>>>
    >>>>http://bt.konicaminolta.ca/products/consumer/paper/inkjet/glossy.html
    >>>>
    >>>>Art
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>Taliesyn wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>>Engelkott wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>>You mean on your Epson. I don't think the newer Canons have such
    >>>>>>>a lever. I think my earlier i850 had a lever and then it magically
    >>>>>>>disappeared on the i860. And I've never bothered with thickness
    >>>>>>>ever again - envelopes, thin paper, thick paper - all treated the
    >>>>>>>same.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>-Taliesyn
    >>>>>>>__________________________________________________________
    >>>>>>>The Taliesyn Website: http://www.colba.net/~andresk
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>I have never bothered to adjust the lever before but with the problem
    >>>>>>i have been having it might be a solution as the paper is 250gsm. The
    >>>>>>paper i print letters on is Epson 80gsm.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>Engelkott
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>250gsm? Is that the same as 250g/m2? I'm more used to the lbs thingy.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>My Costco Kirkland photo paper is labeled 68lb 260 g/m2 / 10 mil. This
    >>>>>is very nice thick stuff, with a hard, almost glass-like finish. Okay,
    >>>>>I exaggerate a little. But it's wonderful paper and it works just fine
    >>>>>in my Canons with no paper thickness adjustments necessary. There have
    >>>>>never been any stray ink marks on them. They come 8.5 x 11, but I just
    >>>>>"Edward Scissorhand" them down to 4 x 6 size for photos. I use a mela-
    >>>>>mine cutting surface, an exacto knife (from the dollar store), a metal
    >>>>>ruler, and the comparative method to cut them to size. Comparative met-
    >>>>>hod means I simply use a scrap 4 x 6 (or longer the better) photo as a
    >>>>>measuring guide. Usually I just cut them to the 4 inch width, leaving
    >>>>>the length 8.5 inches, or whatever. Then after the photo is printed, I
    >>>>>just trim off the excess from the length. Very simple. As this paper is
    >>>>>instant dry, I don't have to worry about handling it right away.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>-Taliesyn
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >
    >
  45. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    It is high gloss with a very smooth surface (not totally smooth, but more
    smooth than the Epson glossy photo paper that has a bit of an "orange peel"
    irregularity.)

    "Arthur Entlich" <artistic@telus.net> wrote in message
    news:ssd1e.109684$fc4.30899@edtnps89...
    >I understood the Kirkland paper to be high gloss. I rarely use high gloss,
    >but I happened to really like the Konica results with Epson inks, so for my
    >portfolio sheets I didn't mind using it.
    >
    > Next time I'm in Costco, I'll give it a good look.
    >
    > Art
    >
    > Burt wrote:
    >
    >> Art - Someone mentioned in a post that the Kirkland paper was Ilford
    >> Pearl. The Ilford site shows Pearl as a slightly heavier weight paper.
    >> Perhaps they use the same coating on a slightly lighter weight paper for
    >> the discount store sales? Regardless of source, I would suggest you buy
    >> a box and try it. I must say, however, that I like it better with my
    >> Canon i960 than my old Epson Stylus 900 (which I revived with the help of
    >> your excellent monograph).
    >>
    >> "Arthur Entlich" <artistic@telus.net> wrote in message
    >> news:mnR%d.63887$KI2.19876@clgrps12...
    >>
    >>>Hmm...
    >>>
    >>>I was just on the Ilford site and I can't find any of their papers that
    >>>quite matches the Kirkland. May be a different product being made by
    >>>Ilford's mills, but strangely the stats are nearly identical to the
    >>>Konica. Maybe Konica is also made in Switzerland now (used to be made in
    >>>Japan)?
    >>>
    >>>Konica's paper is listed as 260g/m2 10.4 mil super high gloss
    >>>
    >>>They have another high gloss professional product called Konica QP which
    >>>is 305g/m2, 11.8 mil, but teh one I used last was 10 mil.
    >>>
    >>>Ilford Gloss Smooth is 280g/m2 10.8 mil 22-28% gloss at 20 degrees
    >>>Ilford Classic Gloss is 240g/m2 9 mil 50-80% gloss at 20 degrees
    >>>Ilford Smoth High Gloss is 235 g/m2, 7 mil 40% gloss at 20 degrees
    >>>
    >>>I'll take a look at the Kirkland, but I'm really after a nicely
    >>>discounted version of the Konica QP (not QC, that was an error). Branded
    >>>as Konica, it's to costly.
    >>>
    >>>Art
    >>>
    >>>measekite wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>
    >>>>Arthur Entlich wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>>The paper you speak of (Kirkland /Costco), I'm guessing is made by
    >>>>>Konica.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>That is in the past. Made in Switzerland, word has it that it is Ilford
    >>>>Gallerie Glossy. I would suggest you get a package $20 for 120 8.5x11
    >>>>sheets. Then go get a package of Ilford Gallerie Glossy at
    >>>>www.inksupply.com . Compare and let us know what you think.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>>They have a paper was called Konica QC which was actually coated with a
    >>>>>ceramic coating and it does look like glass. They now state it is
    >>>>>resin coated, so maybe its been changed. I've been looking for a
    >>>>>cheaper source for it, as I really like it with my Epsons. It
    >>>>>apparently is microporous technology, meaning it is not as permanent
    >>>>>with dye inks as a swellable polymer might be, but it usually is water
    >>>>>proof once it dries, and the surface, when one is after that mirror
    >>>>>gloss, is just beautiful. I'm going to have to track this down... I
    >>>>>hope they have it in Western Canada. Office Depot brand paper in the
    >>>>>US seems to be Konica Premium Glossy, but not in Canada.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>The specs seem correct from what you've stated:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>See:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>http://bt.konicaminolta.ca/products/consumer/paper/inkjet/glossy.html
    >>>>>
    >>>>>Art
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>Taliesyn wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>Engelkott wrote:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>You mean on your Epson. I don't think the newer Canons have such
    >>>>>>>>a lever. I think my earlier i850 had a lever and then it magically
    >>>>>>>>disappeared on the i860. And I've never bothered with thickness
    >>>>>>>>ever again - envelopes, thin paper, thick paper - all treated the
    >>>>>>>>same.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>-Taliesyn
    >>>>>>>>__________________________________________________________
    >>>>>>>>The Taliesyn Website: http://www.colba.net/~andresk
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>I have never bothered to adjust the lever before but with the problem
    >>>>>>>i have been having it might be a solution as the paper is 250gsm. The
    >>>>>>>paper i print letters on is Epson 80gsm.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>Engelkott
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>250gsm? Is that the same as 250g/m2? I'm more used to the lbs thingy.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>My Costco Kirkland photo paper is labeled 68lb 260 g/m2 / 10 mil. This
    >>>>>>is very nice thick stuff, with a hard, almost glass-like finish. Okay,
    >>>>>>I exaggerate a little. But it's wonderful paper and it works just fine
    >>>>>>in my Canons with no paper thickness adjustments necessary. There have
    >>>>>>never been any stray ink marks on them. They come 8.5 x 11, but I just
    >>>>>>"Edward Scissorhand" them down to 4 x 6 size for photos. I use a mela-
    >>>>>>mine cutting surface, an exacto knife (from the dollar store), a metal
    >>>>>>ruler, and the comparative method to cut them to size. Comparative
    >>>>>>met-
    >>>>>>hod means I simply use a scrap 4 x 6 (or longer the better) photo as a
    >>>>>>measuring guide. Usually I just cut them to the 4 inch width, leaving
    >>>>>>the length 8.5 inches, or whatever. Then after the photo is printed, I
    >>>>>>just trim off the excess from the length. Very simple. As this paper
    >>>>>>is
    >>>>>>instant dry, I don't have to worry about handling it right away.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>-Taliesyn
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>
  46. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    On Sat, 26 Mar 2005 13:57:03 GMT, Arthur Entlich <artistic@telus.net>
    wrote:

    >I think Epson is being too conservative regarding the thickness of the
    >paper, personally.
    >
    >I use the thickness lever all the time for thicker stock and although I
    >can't swear to it without more research, I believe Epson indicated in
    >one or more instructions that one could raise the heads with the
    >envelope lever should I be using thicker papers.
    >
    >Art

    I agree with what you said, it is just when a tech support guy says
    something like he did it makes you stop and canvas opinion before
    ruining a printer. :)

    What would the consensus of opinion be on having renewable print
    heads? Do the printers which have that (do HP?) have any advantage
    over non-changeable head printers?

    Engelkott
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