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VERY Basic liquid cooling question (I think) PLEASE ADVISE

Last response: in Overclocking
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June 7, 2006 4:06:30 AM

Ok so I got a coolermaster aquagate cooling system for my cpu because I want to overclock it. However, it does not come with a VGA waterblock or any way to extend the system to the video card. What I was wondering is this: Is is possible for me to simply buy a vga waterblock and some tubing and run the thing to my card before it goes back to the system? will this effect the flow? I'm a total rookie with the liquid cooling stuff so any help is apprecgtiated but please don't assume any pre existing knowledge on my part as I have none. Thanks!
June 7, 2006 4:43:57 AM

yep it will reduce the flow/pressure etc.... dont get me wrong it can be done... how effective it will be is debateable...
June 7, 2006 4:45:14 AM

yes you can do this, as i'm sure you realize that kit is not a very good one and is intended for cooling one component only but you could probably get slightly better than the stock cooler on the vga card if you extend your loop.

When doing so make sure that the vga block has the same size connectors as the cpu block. Basically I think your kit is either 1/4" or 3/8" so buy a couple more feet of that size tubing and make sure your vga block has the right size connectors, buy a couple more hose clamps and you're set to go. make sure you run it for a couple hours after you are done to leak test it before giving power to everything else. wet with no power is ok, wet with power is bad.. bad.. boom.
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June 7, 2006 6:16:10 AM

stay away from those aquagate kits, they barely cool your cpu and kill your computer if you add a gpu block on


its doable, only if you have money and a perfectly good computer to burn
June 7, 2006 12:14:31 PM

Like I said I'm pretty new to this but from my knowledge of basic fluid dynamics, it seems like the pressure and flow rate issues could be fixed simply by adding more liquid to the system to compensate for the fact that more tubing has been added. the only issue is see is that the hot water leaving the cpu will be whats I'm sending over to my video caed which is hard to deal with. Anyway, thanks to all for the responses.
June 7, 2006 1:33:40 PM

It's my guess that you bought the wrong water cooling solution if you're going to try to add a gpu water block. But if you're going to do that, then you might as well add a coolant reservoir too. It will give you more coolant to work with and a little extra coolant pressure behind the pump.
June 13, 2006 7:07:15 PM

You can always throw a split in there and have 2 seperate lines, 1 to your CPU, one to the GPU. Unfortunatly from what every above me has said I highly doubt the parts you bought will be enough to achieve good cooling this way.
June 13, 2006 7:30:35 PM

Your basic fluid mechanics is wrong. Of course you need to add more tubing and more fluid but now you have more mass to move (fluid) and more resistance by adding another water block, both of these will will tax your pump (which was not designed to add another component).

Those systems have been designed to be as cheap as possible which is why they typically use 1/4" hose and a small pump with no reservoir. Almost all custom systems use 1/2" hose, an industrial water pump which can pump water to a 10' lift and have a reservoir to remove any bubbles and to make filling the system easier as well as a radiator (2 x 120mm).

As to the idea of "hot" fluid going from your cpu to your gpu, I doubt that the temperature of the water is more than a 3C differential between the input and output of the cpu water block.
June 13, 2006 7:48:56 PM

Is the Minigate your only solution or do you have some kind of budget?

Where there is a will there is a way....
June 14, 2006 12:39:32 PM

Quote:
Like I said I'm pretty new to this but from my knowledge of basic fluid dynamics, it seems like the pressure and flow rate issues could be fixed simply by adding more liquid to the system to compensate for the fact that more tubing has been added. the only issue is see is that the hot water leaving the cpu will be whats I'm sending over to my video caed which is hard to deal with. Anyway, thanks to all for the responses.


You really should trust the cautionary advice you received. These guys have real world experience and when Shawnlizzle told you you'd fry your computer, he wasn't kidding. If you want to go with a prepackaged system like the one you got, then just order another for the GPU or get a TT Tidewater.
June 14, 2006 1:23:23 PM

The aquagate seems to be fairly flexible when compared to the other premade kits like Evercool, Kingwin or Titan as they use proprietary tubing and connects. The aquagate can use standard tubing (although I am not aware of the tubing size - I think it might be 3/8 OD though) and employs barbs and quick connects.

Because of this, it - seemingly - could be customizable as far as varying from the orginal kits design or use. However, in looking at the hardware inside, it looks to use one 80mm rad and a single fan. The pump is not that powerful (compared to, say, the Swiftech 655) putting out about 150 gallons/hour. On idle it can make as much as an 11 degree difference (or so) and on load, 15 degrees - compared to a stock heatsink. This is using the fan setting in the kit at its highest setting (which, I read, is loud at 49db)

So you figure, you could probably get a better bran heatsink that could do considerably better than the stock. But, since you want to watercool, it just seem that adding anything else tot he kit than what it intended for would yield more resistance and worsening results. This doesn't bode well for what you hope to achieve though.

One 80mm rad and fan setup like this kit uses doesn't remove alot of heat already - adding more heat tot he loop might produce, quite literally, negligible cooling at best.

What is your budget for watercooling?
June 14, 2006 3:36:05 PM

Doesn't look like much of a kit to me, and I like Cooler Master products. Do yourself a favor and save up a little more money, go with Swiftech or another name brand, and do the ol' reservoir/pump/radiator/waterblock.

Gotta tell ya, I have an SLI system with the cpu and gpu's all watercooled, and I WILL NEVER DO IT AGAIN! Too much hassle for not enough gain, especially if something goes wrong and I have to work inside the case. Stick with watercooling the cpu and go aftermarket aircooling on the gpu(s).

Was looking at cooling my Mini Mullet with water, but due to space considerations had to stick with aircooling. What I was going to use was the Swiftech MCP350/reservoir (nice combo, fits in one 5.25" drive bay, pull out front of case an inch or two to fill), a Danger Den 120MM rad I have, and a Swiftech Apogee waterblock. Price will run you $200+, and you can add gpu waterblocks if you want to go that way... but at least you can buy the parts a couple at a time for budget purposes.

Watercooling rocks, but no more watercooling the gpu's for me...

PDH-NicFury 8)
June 14, 2006 6:07:45 PM

Quote:
Gotta tell ya, I have an SLI system with the cpu and gpu's all watercooled, and I WILL NEVER DO IT AGAIN! Too much hassle for not enough gain, especially if something goes wrong and I have to work inside the case. Stick with watercooling the cpu and go aftermarket aircooling on the gpu(s).


I have near zero experience watercooling PCs but tons of experience water, phase change, etc., with instrumentation and I think that's why every time I start to drift towards water on a PC, I slap myself back to reality. I'm brainstorming a high performance air system and hope to get off my butt and build it by the end of summer.
June 14, 2006 11:46:18 PM

well, i really appreciate all the advice from everyone. Help from people who know more than me is always welcome. I've prety much decided not to add a vga block based on all this advice.

Maybe I should start a new thred for this but this one already has some momentum. Anyway, do you think the stock cooling on my gpu (evga Geforece 7900 GT CO) good enough?
June 14, 2006 11:48:22 PM

In more direct response to Clue69Less, I'm pretty interested in what your "brainstormed" system might entail. I'd love to see some more details :D 
June 15, 2006 1:41:49 AM

Quote:
In more direct response to Clue69Less, I'm pretty interested in what your "brainstormed" system might entail. I'd love to see some more details :D 


I'd like to build a CPU cooler with more heat pipes than typical units and have them feed a larger surface area of copper plates. Then have a case-mounted support system to keep the HS weight off of the mobo and to hold the HS fans. After that works (or more accurately, if it works) I'll try a similar plan with the graphics card(s). Etc. Probably a waste of time and money complete with screwdrivers tossed across the room and into the drywall. Anyway, that's phase 1.0. Phase 2 is where it gets serious.
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