Need help setting up a new identity

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

We have a computer at work that has multiple users, but only one identity at
the moment. I would like to set up a new identity and set it up so that
certain programs already installed on the computer can only be accessed by
the new identity. Other programs we would like accessed by both identities.

Can someone point me to a simple walkthrough of this process? Thanks!
5 answers Last reply
More about need setting identity
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    I assume by identities you mean you wish to create new users. Open Control
    Panel, open User Accounts, click "Create a new account" and follow the
    screen. Note, if these accounts are to be password protected, when you
    finish creating the account, in the left frame there should be a link about
    protecting your computer from lost passwords, use that and follow the
    instructions for creating a password reset disk.

    As to the access issue, you will need to use the Group Profile Editor:
    http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;307882

    Note, the Group Profile Editor is only available in XP Pro and is not
    available in XP Home Edition. In addition to the information above with
    regard to setting user access, you might want to post this question to the
    windowsxp.configuration_manage newsgroup as they may be able to give you
    specific instructions beyond the general use of the Group Policy Editor
    article to which I've provided a link above.

    Also note, many applications were not created for a multi-user environment
    and the GPE notwithstanding, you may need to do the following to give access
    to more than one user:
    First, be sure the account to which you wish to grant access is set to
    administrator and not limited. Install the applications to the same folder
    in which it was originally installed. This will look the same as one
    install on your hard drive but create the pointers necessary for this user
    to have access to the application.

    Once the installation is complete, you can return the account to its limited
    status if that is what you want and the user should still have access.


    --
    Michael Solomon MS-MVP
    Windows Shell/User
    Backup is a PC User's Best Friend
    DTS-L.Org: http://www.dts-l.org/

    "Vance McAlister" <v.mcalister@ejgd.com> wrote in message
    news:%23weaKlaoEHA.2920@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
    > We have a computer at work that has multiple users, but only one identity
    > at
    > the moment. I would like to set up a new identity and set it up so that
    > certain programs already installed on the computer can only be accessed by
    > the new identity. Other programs we would like accessed by both
    > identities.
    >
    > Can someone point me to a simple walkthrough of this process? Thanks!
    >
    >
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    Thank you very much for your help. I have printed this out already. The
    problem I see is that we are using XP Home on that machine. Is there any
    way to limit access with Home?

    "Michael Solomon (MS-MVP Windows Shell/User)" <user@#notme.com> wrote in
    message news:%23ZvL1yaoEHA.2864@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
    > I assume by identities you mean you wish to create new users. Open
    Control
    > Panel, open User Accounts, click "Create a new account" and follow the
    > screen. Note, if these accounts are to be password protected, when you
    > finish creating the account, in the left frame there should be a link
    about
    > protecting your computer from lost passwords, use that and follow the
    > instructions for creating a password reset disk.
    >
    > As to the access issue, you will need to use the Group Profile Editor:
    > http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;307882
    >
    > Note, the Group Profile Editor is only available in XP Pro and is not
    > available in XP Home Edition. In addition to the information above with
    > regard to setting user access, you might want to post this question to the
    > windowsxp.configuration_manage newsgroup as they may be able to give you
    > specific instructions beyond the general use of the Group Policy Editor
    > article to which I've provided a link above.
    >
    > Also note, many applications were not created for a multi-user environment
    > and the GPE notwithstanding, you may need to do the following to give
    access
    > to more than one user:
    > First, be sure the account to which you wish to grant access is set to
    > administrator and not limited. Install the applications to the same
    folder
    > in which it was originally installed. This will look the same as one
    > install on your hard drive but create the pointers necessary for this user
    > to have access to the application.
    >
    > Once the installation is complete, you can return the account to its
    limited
    > status if that is what you want and the user should still have access.
    >
    >
    > --
    > Michael Solomon MS-MVP
    > Windows Shell/User
    > Backup is a PC User's Best Friend
    > DTS-L.Org: http://www.dts-l.org/
    >
    > "Vance McAlister" <v.mcalister@ejgd.com> wrote in message
    > news:%23weaKlaoEHA.2920@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
    > > We have a computer at work that has multiple users, but only one
    identity
    > > at
    > > the moment. I would like to set up a new identity and set it up so that
    > > certain programs already installed on the computer can only be accessed
    by
    > > the new identity. Other programs we would like accessed by both
    > > identities.
    > >
    > > Can someone point me to a simple walkthrough of this process? Thanks!
    > >
    > >
    >
    >
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    Well, you could try simply making a user a limited account and not install
    the application in that user account. However, some applications might
    still be accessible so you'd have to test. The next layer of security you
    could employ would be to try to use file ownership to keep them from
    initializing the application.

    If you understand how to take ownership, you might be able to use the
    procedure to block ownership by not having the user listed on the security
    tab but understand, in Home Edition, this is a bit of a convoluted procedure
    as follows:

    These are the instructions for taking ownership of a file in XP Home
    Edition:

    XP-Home

    Unfortunately, XP Home using NTFS is essentially hard wired for "Simple File
    Sharing" at system level.

    However, you can set XP Home permissions in Safe Mode. Reboot, and start
    hitting F8, a menu should eventually appear and one of the
    options is Safe Mode. Select it. Note, it will ask for the administrator's
    password. This is not your administrator account, rather it is the
    machine's administrator account for which users are asked to create a
    password during setup.

    If you created no such password, when requested, leave blank and press
    enter.

    Open Explorer, go to Tools and Folder Options, on the view tab, scroll to
    the bottom of the list, if it shows "Enable Simple File Sharing" deselect it
    and click apply and ok. If it shows nothing or won't let you make a change,
    move on to the next step.

    Navigate to the files, right click, select properties, go to the Security
    tab, click advanced, go to the Owner tab and select the user that was logged
    on when you were refused permission to access the files. Click apply and
    ok. Close the properties box, reopen it, click add and type in the name of
    the user you just enabled. If you wish to set ownership for everything in
    the folder, at the bottom of the Owner tab is the following selection:
    "Replace owner on subcontainers and objects," select it as well.

    Once complete, you should be able to do what you wish with these files when
    you log back on as that user.

    --
    Michael Solomon MS-MVP
    Windows Shell/User
    Backup is a PC User's Best Friend
    DTS-L.Org: http://www.dts-l.org/

    "Vance McAlister" <v.mcalister@ejgd.com> wrote in message
    news:u2W%23LicoEHA.260@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
    > Thank you very much for your help. I have printed this out already. The
    > problem I see is that we are using XP Home on that machine. Is there any
    > way to limit access with Home?
    >
    > "Michael Solomon (MS-MVP Windows Shell/User)" <user@#notme.com> wrote in
    > message news:%23ZvL1yaoEHA.2864@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
    >> I assume by identities you mean you wish to create new users. Open
    > Control
    >> Panel, open User Accounts, click "Create a new account" and follow the
    >> screen. Note, if these accounts are to be password protected, when you
    >> finish creating the account, in the left frame there should be a link
    > about
    >> protecting your computer from lost passwords, use that and follow the
    >> instructions for creating a password reset disk.
    >>
    >> As to the access issue, you will need to use the Group Profile Editor:
    >> http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;307882
    >>
    >> Note, the Group Profile Editor is only available in XP Pro and is not
    >> available in XP Home Edition. In addition to the information above with
    >> regard to setting user access, you might want to post this question to
    >> the
    >> windowsxp.configuration_manage newsgroup as they may be able to give you
    >> specific instructions beyond the general use of the Group Policy Editor
    >> article to which I've provided a link above.
    >>
    >> Also note, many applications were not created for a multi-user
    >> environment
    >> and the GPE notwithstanding, you may need to do the following to give
    > access
    >> to more than one user:
    >> First, be sure the account to which you wish to grant access is set to
    >> administrator and not limited. Install the applications to the same
    > folder
    >> in which it was originally installed. This will look the same as one
    >> install on your hard drive but create the pointers necessary for this
    >> user
    >> to have access to the application.
    >>
    >> Once the installation is complete, you can return the account to its
    > limited
    >> status if that is what you want and the user should still have access.
    >>
    >>
    >> --
    >> Michael Solomon MS-MVP
    >> Windows Shell/User
    >> Backup is a PC User's Best Friend
    >> DTS-L.Org: http://www.dts-l.org/
    >>
    >> "Vance McAlister" <v.mcalister@ejgd.com> wrote in message
    >> news:%23weaKlaoEHA.2920@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
    >> > We have a computer at work that has multiple users, but only one
    > identity
    >> > at
    >> > the moment. I would like to set up a new identity and set it up so
    >> > that
    >> > certain programs already installed on the computer can only be accessed
    > by
    >> > the new identity. Other programs we would like accessed by both
    >> > identities.
    >> >
    >> > Can someone point me to a simple walkthrough of this process? Thanks!
    >> >
    >> >
    >>
    >>
    >
    >
  4. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    Great! I will try this and let you know how it goes.

    "Michael Solomon (MS-MVP Windows Shell/User)" <user@#notme.com> wrote in
    message news:ekjJBvcoEHA.2864@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
    > Well, you could try simply making a user a limited account and not install
    > the application in that user account. However, some applications might
    > still be accessible so you'd have to test. The next layer of security you
    > could employ would be to try to use file ownership to keep them from
    > initializing the application.
    >
    > If you understand how to take ownership, you might be able to use the
    > procedure to block ownership by not having the user listed on the security
    > tab but understand, in Home Edition, this is a bit of a convoluted
    procedure
    > as follows:
    >
    > These are the instructions for taking ownership of a file in XP Home
    > Edition:
    >
    > XP-Home
    >
    > Unfortunately, XP Home using NTFS is essentially hard wired for "Simple
    File
    > Sharing" at system level.
    >
    > However, you can set XP Home permissions in Safe Mode. Reboot, and start
    > hitting F8, a menu should eventually appear and one of the
    > options is Safe Mode. Select it. Note, it will ask for the
    administrator's
    > password. This is not your administrator account, rather it is the
    > machine's administrator account for which users are asked to create a
    > password during setup.
    >
    > If you created no such password, when requested, leave blank and press
    > enter.
    >
    > Open Explorer, go to Tools and Folder Options, on the view tab, scroll to
    > the bottom of the list, if it shows "Enable Simple File Sharing" deselect
    it
    > and click apply and ok. If it shows nothing or won't let you make a
    change,
    > move on to the next step.
    >
    > Navigate to the files, right click, select properties, go to the Security
    > tab, click advanced, go to the Owner tab and select the user that was
    logged
    > on when you were refused permission to access the files. Click apply and
    > ok. Close the properties box, reopen it, click add and type in the name
    of
    > the user you just enabled. If you wish to set ownership for everything in
    > the folder, at the bottom of the Owner tab is the following selection:
    > "Replace owner on subcontainers and objects," select it as well.
    >
    > Once complete, you should be able to do what you wish with these files
    when
    > you log back on as that user.
    >
    > --
    > Michael Solomon MS-MVP
    > Windows Shell/User
    > Backup is a PC User's Best Friend
    > DTS-L.Org: http://www.dts-l.org/
    >
    > "Vance McAlister" <v.mcalister@ejgd.com> wrote in message
    > news:u2W%23LicoEHA.260@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
    > > Thank you very much for your help. I have printed this out already. The
    > > problem I see is that we are using XP Home on that machine. Is there
    any
    > > way to limit access with Home?
    > >
    > > "Michael Solomon (MS-MVP Windows Shell/User)" <user@#notme.com> wrote in
    > > message news:%23ZvL1yaoEHA.2864@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
    > >> I assume by identities you mean you wish to create new users. Open
    > > Control
    > >> Panel, open User Accounts, click "Create a new account" and follow the
    > >> screen. Note, if these accounts are to be password protected, when you
    > >> finish creating the account, in the left frame there should be a link
    > > about
    > >> protecting your computer from lost passwords, use that and follow the
    > >> instructions for creating a password reset disk.
    > >>
    > >> As to the access issue, you will need to use the Group Profile Editor:
    > >> http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;307882
    > >>
    > >> Note, the Group Profile Editor is only available in XP Pro and is not
    > >> available in XP Home Edition. In addition to the information above
    with
    > >> regard to setting user access, you might want to post this question to
    > >> the
    > >> windowsxp.configuration_manage newsgroup as they may be able to give
    you
    > >> specific instructions beyond the general use of the Group Policy Editor
    > >> article to which I've provided a link above.
    > >>
    > >> Also note, many applications were not created for a multi-user
    > >> environment
    > >> and the GPE notwithstanding, you may need to do the following to give
    > > access
    > >> to more than one user:
    > >> First, be sure the account to which you wish to grant access is set to
    > >> administrator and not limited. Install the applications to the same
    > > folder
    > >> in which it was originally installed. This will look the same as one
    > >> install on your hard drive but create the pointers necessary for this
    > >> user
    > >> to have access to the application.
    > >>
    > >> Once the installation is complete, you can return the account to its
    > > limited
    > >> status if that is what you want and the user should still have access.
    > >>
    > >>
    > >> --
    > >> Michael Solomon MS-MVP
    > >> Windows Shell/User
    > >> Backup is a PC User's Best Friend
    > >> DTS-L.Org: http://www.dts-l.org/
    > >>
    > >> "Vance McAlister" <v.mcalister@ejgd.com> wrote in message
    > >> news:%23weaKlaoEHA.2920@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
    > >> > We have a computer at work that has multiple users, but only one
    > > identity
    > >> > at
    > >> > the moment. I would like to set up a new identity and set it up so
    > >> > that
    > >> > certain programs already installed on the computer can only be
    accessed
    > > by
    > >> > the new identity. Other programs we would like accessed by both
    > >> > identities.
    > >> >
    > >> > Can someone point me to a simple walkthrough of this process?
    Thanks!
    > >> >
    > >> >
    > >>
    > >>
    > >
    > >
    >
    >
  5. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    Good luck.

    --
    Michael Solomon MS-MVP
    Windows Shell/User
    Backup is a PC User's Best Friend
    DTS-L.Org: http://www.dts-l.org/

    "Vance McAlister" <v.mcalister@ejgd.com> wrote in message
    news:OH9IdjmoEHA.3520@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
    > Great! I will try this and let you know how it goes.
    >
    > "Michael Solomon (MS-MVP Windows Shell/User)" <user@#notme.com> wrote in
    > message news:ekjJBvcoEHA.2864@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
    >> Well, you could try simply making a user a limited account and not
    >> install
    >> the application in that user account. However, some applications might
    >> still be accessible so you'd have to test. The next layer of security
    >> you
    >> could employ would be to try to use file ownership to keep them from
    >> initializing the application.
    >>
    >> If you understand how to take ownership, you might be able to use the
    >> procedure to block ownership by not having the user listed on the
    >> security
    >> tab but understand, in Home Edition, this is a bit of a convoluted
    > procedure
    >> as follows:
    >>
    >> These are the instructions for taking ownership of a file in XP Home
    >> Edition:
    >>
    >> XP-Home
    >>
    >> Unfortunately, XP Home using NTFS is essentially hard wired for "Simple
    > File
    >> Sharing" at system level.
    >>
    >> However, you can set XP Home permissions in Safe Mode. Reboot, and start
    >> hitting F8, a menu should eventually appear and one of the
    >> options is Safe Mode. Select it. Note, it will ask for the
    > administrator's
    >> password. This is not your administrator account, rather it is the
    >> machine's administrator account for which users are asked to create a
    >> password during setup.
    >>
    >> If you created no such password, when requested, leave blank and press
    >> enter.
    >>
    >> Open Explorer, go to Tools and Folder Options, on the view tab, scroll to
    >> the bottom of the list, if it shows "Enable Simple File Sharing" deselect
    > it
    >> and click apply and ok. If it shows nothing or won't let you make a
    > change,
    >> move on to the next step.
    >>
    >> Navigate to the files, right click, select properties, go to the Security
    >> tab, click advanced, go to the Owner tab and select the user that was
    > logged
    >> on when you were refused permission to access the files. Click apply and
    >> ok. Close the properties box, reopen it, click add and type in the name
    > of
    >> the user you just enabled. If you wish to set ownership for everything
    >> in
    >> the folder, at the bottom of the Owner tab is the following selection:
    >> "Replace owner on subcontainers and objects," select it as well.
    >>
    >> Once complete, you should be able to do what you wish with these files
    > when
    >> you log back on as that user.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Michael Solomon MS-MVP
    >> Windows Shell/User
    >> Backup is a PC User's Best Friend
    >> DTS-L.Org: http://www.dts-l.org/
    >>
    >> "Vance McAlister" <v.mcalister@ejgd.com> wrote in message
    >> news:u2W%23LicoEHA.260@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
    >> > Thank you very much for your help. I have printed this out already.
    >> > The
    >> > problem I see is that we are using XP Home on that machine. Is there
    > any
    >> > way to limit access with Home?
    >> >
    >> > "Michael Solomon (MS-MVP Windows Shell/User)" <user@#notme.com> wrote
    >> > in
    >> > message news:%23ZvL1yaoEHA.2864@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
    >> >> I assume by identities you mean you wish to create new users. Open
    >> > Control
    >> >> Panel, open User Accounts, click "Create a new account" and follow the
    >> >> screen. Note, if these accounts are to be password protected, when
    >> >> you
    >> >> finish creating the account, in the left frame there should be a link
    >> > about
    >> >> protecting your computer from lost passwords, use that and follow the
    >> >> instructions for creating a password reset disk.
    >> >>
    >> >> As to the access issue, you will need to use the Group Profile Editor:
    >> >> http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;307882
    >> >>
    >> >> Note, the Group Profile Editor is only available in XP Pro and is not
    >> >> available in XP Home Edition. In addition to the information above
    > with
    >> >> regard to setting user access, you might want to post this question to
    >> >> the
    >> >> windowsxp.configuration_manage newsgroup as they may be able to give
    > you
    >> >> specific instructions beyond the general use of the Group Policy
    >> >> Editor
    >> >> article to which I've provided a link above.
    >> >>
    >> >> Also note, many applications were not created for a multi-user
    >> >> environment
    >> >> and the GPE notwithstanding, you may need to do the following to give
    >> > access
    >> >> to more than one user:
    >> >> First, be sure the account to which you wish to grant access is set to
    >> >> administrator and not limited. Install the applications to the same
    >> > folder
    >> >> in which it was originally installed. This will look the same as one
    >> >> install on your hard drive but create the pointers necessary for this
    >> >> user
    >> >> to have access to the application.
    >> >>
    >> >> Once the installation is complete, you can return the account to its
    >> > limited
    >> >> status if that is what you want and the user should still have access.
    >> >>
    >> >>
    >> >> --
    >> >> Michael Solomon MS-MVP
    >> >> Windows Shell/User
    >> >> Backup is a PC User's Best Friend
    >> >> DTS-L.Org: http://www.dts-l.org/
    >> >>
    >> >> "Vance McAlister" <v.mcalister@ejgd.com> wrote in message
    >> >> news:%23weaKlaoEHA.2920@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
    >> >> > We have a computer at work that has multiple users, but only one
    >> > identity
    >> >> > at
    >> >> > the moment. I would like to set up a new identity and set it up so
    >> >> > that
    >> >> > certain programs already installed on the computer can only be
    > accessed
    >> > by
    >> >> > the new identity. Other programs we would like accessed by both
    >> >> > identities.
    >> >> >
    >> >> > Can someone point me to a simple walkthrough of this process?
    > Thanks!
    >> >> >
    >> >> >
    >> >>
    >> >>
    >> >
    >> >
    >>
    >>
    >
    >
Ask a new question

Read More

Computers Microsoft Windows XP