Wise to Overclock a Laptop?

I currently own a Dell Inspirion 9300. The inner workings are a Pentium M at 1.83ghz, 1gig 433mhz fsb (dont know pcrating) and the Geforce 6800 GO 256mb. I know its not totally needed yet even with the current games, but I would like to get more performance from my system.

What are the options for overclocking a laptop? Is it advisable to do so since you are limited on the cooling ability? If something does happen to fail/fry in the process, what are my opions for repairing/replacing that part WITH OUT contacting Dell since they would extract my left testicle.

Any of information you think would be valued please feel free to point out!
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  1. I don't think it's a good idea.
    All the components of a laptop are packed into a tight space and have quite limited airflow. Things can get very hot - with oc'ing, even hotter. The components can take the >50°C or >120°F longer than your hands, which are resting on it.
  2. Quote:
    I currently own a Dell Inspirion 9300. The inner workings are a Pentium M at 1.83ghz, 1gig 433mhz fsb (dont know pcrating) and the Geforce 6800 GO 256mb. I know its not totally needed yet even with the current games, but I would like to get more performance from my system.

    What are the options for overclocking a laptop? Is it advisable to do so since you are limited on the cooling ability? If something does happen to fail/fry in the process, what are my opions for repairing/replacing that part WITH OUT contacting Dell since they would extract my left testicle.

    Any of information you think would be valued please feel free to point out!
    Heat is the BIG problem with laptops. I've seen a few good articles, where they overclocked a PM Banias. They pin modded the CPU, which bumped the FSB from 400-533, with great results. But, obviously the type of processor in the laptop will determine whether an O/C is feasable. There are also a lack of suitable BIOS option for overclocking, that's why the Banias cored Pentium M was overclockable. Yours is a Dothan core, and therefore (with the 533 FSB) there is no "easy" pin mod to fool the motherboard. :)
  3. I also hava a Dell Inspiron 9300. Mine has a 1.6GHz Pentium M. The memory is actually DDR2-533 (I think you had a typo) or PC-4200.

    As far as overclocking goes, I don't think that there is a way to overclock the processor. There is a pin mod that you can do that lets you use a 400fsb processor at 533fsb in the Inspiron 9300. That effectively would turn a 1.6GHz into a 2.13GHz. I haven't actually tried this mod but here is a link if you are interested: http://www.notebookforums.com/thread80879.html

    You can easily overclock your Go 6800. The stock clocks for 3D are 290MHz core and 295MHz (DDR590) memory. I have mine overclocked to 350MHz core and 350MHz (DDR700) memory. I use coolbits to do the overclocking. I also use it to slightly underclock the 2D clock speeds (underclocking too far results in stability problems). Here is a link to download coolbits: http://downloads.guru3d.com/download.php?det=815

    There is aslo a way to swap out the graphics card with a Go 6800 Ultra or even a Go 7800. Here is a link for more information on that: http://www.notebookforums.com/thread113866.html
  4. Dothan core came in 400FSB and 533FSB versions (the 533 version came out with the Sonoma platform and both were the same core). If he can get a replacement Pentium M Dothan core (smaller process, less heat) at 400FSB, pin-modding it to 533FSB is the next obvious step. Good processors would be 1.5Ghz (715), 1.6Ghz (725) and 1.7Ghz (735), anything faster will struggle with the overclock. You'll respectively achieve 2.0Ghz, 2.13Ghz and 2.26Ghz. The 745 might go to 2.4Ghz but you'd be pushing it then. Don't worry about heat, the Pentium M is a good low-power high-performance processor, your laptop will push out the extra heat, the Dell has a good thermal management engine.

    As it stands though, you can't overclock easily. So find that 400FSB CPU and you're good to go.
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