First 2 1/2 hours PPL(H) today!

Archived from groups: rec.aviation.rotorcraft,alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

Today I started an intensive PPL(H) course. (I'm going to fly three times a
week, two hours a day.)

I did an hours trial lesson last year in an R22 which I enjoyed immensely
and cemented my determination to learn to fly these bizarre contraptions.

Finally, nearly a year later I've got the finances sorted out and I'm going
for it. (I'm actually supposed to be in the US doing a full CPL course, but
I couldn't sell my house in time so had to drop the place.) So I'm doing
the JAA PPL(H) in the UK as a first step before deciding on my next course
of action.

My nearest school flies Schweizer 300CBs, so I'm doing my PPL(H) on them. I
know everybody's got their views on the pro and cons of this compared to the
R22 but in the end for me it came down to local convenience.

So, it's a fine Oxfordshire autumn morning and I turn up for the first
lesson, hoping to get a second in today if there's an aircraft's available.
The sun's out, wind is 5 kts, and barring a bit of low haze it looks like
it's going to be a nice day.

The instructor does the initial pre-flight, startup and climb-out to the
west as I shadow him on the checklists and controls. We rise through a
turbulent layer (could be a small temperature inversion as the haze is
suddenly clear), and it's over to me for control familiarisation. Cyclic is
instantly familiar, and I do some turns while trying to keep the airspeed
constant by adjusting the nose attitude. Not too bad, but the instructor
knows I've a lot of r/c heli, a few hours of fixed-wing, and a lot of sim
time.

Next I'm given the collective and make the power adjustments as the
instructor demos climbs and descents. Easy enough. Then I've got the
pedals and things are a little more complicated. As the instructor changes
the power I'm having to compensate on the anti-torque, at this point
over-correcting and occasionally getting into a bit of a yawing oscillation,
but I get it under control. I try a bit of control co-ordination. I can see
it's going to be a challenge mastering them all at once, throughout the
flight envelope.

We land, grab a sarnie and de-brief. He's happy, says I did really well. I
didn't find any of it too taxing, and I've still got a grin on my face 20
minutes later.

The 300's free until late afternoon, so we head out again. This time I do
the checklists and startup, and do the pick-up to where we're light on the
skids. The instructor hover-taxies us out across the active to the heli
practice area on the field, and from there takes us west again away from the
airport. This is where it got interesting! I did turns again, this time
handling the collective, pedals and throttle on my own. Happy with that we
then did climbs and descents, again with me do al the attitude, power, trim
inputs, overspeeding the engine a few times! I'm not having trouble with
knowing what inputs I need to make, the difficulty is knowing how much I
need to do and learning the "feel" for the machine. A couple of times I had
to think twice about which way the throttle works, and it caught me out at
least once when I lowered the collective, and the throttle and the engine
rpm increased, and I reacted by twisting the wrong way. No hassle though,
only slightly above the red, and I corrected once I'm mentally kiced myself.

Climbs and descents went well, so on to climbing and descending turns. This
was 2 hours into the days flying and I was starting to feel a bit full.
Still as enthusiastic as hell, but I began to realise the values of breaks
to let it all sink in. Still, I got the hang of them, and got to the point
where I don't need to think attitude, power, trim, and just do it, otherwise
I too busy thinking about the order in which to do things rather than
watching what's actually happening.

Anyway, back to base for a coffee and debrief again. The instructor thinks
I did really well and reckons if I do 4 to 5 hours a week I should breeze
through it. Not sure how much of that is genuine, and how much is
encouragement to a newbie, but I came away pleased with myself.
Unfortunately, I can't go up again until next Wednesday due to other
commitments, and I can't wait!!

Si
40 answers Last reply
More about first hours today
  1. Archived from groups: rec.aviation.rotorcraft,alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

    Simon Robbins wrote:

    > Today I started an intensive PPL(H) course. (I'm going to fly three times a
    > week, two hours a day.)
    >
    > I did an hours trial lesson last year in an R22 which I enjoyed immensely
    > and cemented my determination to learn to fly these bizarre contraptions.
    >
    >My nearest school flies Schweizer 300CBs, so I'm doing my PPL(H) on them. I
    > know everybody's got their views on the pro and cons of this compared to the
    > R22 but in the end for me it came down to local convenience.
    >


    The 300 is the aircraft I began in. Love it.

    > Happy with that we
    > then did climbs and descents, again with me do al the attitude, power, trim
    > inputs, overspeeding the engine a few times! I'm not having trouble with
    > knowing what inputs I need to make, the difficulty is knowing how much I
    > need to do and learning the "feel" for the machine.

    Thank goodness for the overspeed governor. There were some that did the
    same on their first solo. Picking the 300 up and accidentally adding
    too much throttle. When the overspeed gov kicks the rpm back down the
    student easily got confused and rolled the throttle the wrong way so the
    aircraft was kicking around all over the sky. But somehow the ones we
    watched were able to get the 300 back on the ground, where the
    instructor climbed back in for some more hover work. :)

    >A couple of times I had
    > to think twice about which way the throttle works, and it caught me out at
    > least once when I lowered the collective, and the throttle and the engine
    > rpm increased, and I reacted by twisting the wrong way.
    >

    Many that drive motorcycles had a hard time getting used to the 300's
    throttle direction.

    > The instructor thinks
    > I did really well and reckons if I do 4 to 5 hours a week I should breeze
    > through it. Not sure how much of that is genuine, and how much is
    > encouragement to a newbie, but I came away pleased with myself.
    > Unfortunately, I can't go up again until next Wednesday due to other
    > commitments, and I can't wait!!
    >
    > Si
    >
    >

    Usually an instructor will give some positive feedback to the student
    but they would never say that you should "breeze through it" unless they
    meant it. So it sounds very good for you.... AAkkk, today is Wednesday,
    how did it go??????

    --

    boB,
    SAG 70

    U.S. Army Aviation (retired)
    Central Texas - 5NM West of Gray Army Airfield (KGRK)
  2. Archived from groups: rec.aviation.rotorcraft,alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

    On Wed, 7 Sep 2005 17:50:17 +0100, "Simon Robbins"
    <simon@NOSPAMsjrobbins.demon.co.uk> wrote:

    >Today I started an intensive PPL(H) course. (I'm going to fly three times a
    >week, two hours a day.)

    Right up until you get sick of helicopters.. heheh I have to admit
    that as I've trained/studied, I've had brief periods where I didn't
    want a damn thing to do with helicopters..

    >I did an hours trial lesson last year in an R22 which I enjoyed immensely
    >and cemented my determination to learn to fly these bizarre contraptions.
    >
    >Finally, nearly a year later I've got the finances sorted out and I'm going
    >for it. (I'm actually supposed to be in the US doing a full CPL course, but
    >I couldn't sell my house in time so had to drop the place.) So I'm doing
    >the JAA PPL(H) in the UK as a first step before deciding on my next course
    >of action.
    >
    >My nearest school flies Schweizer 300CBs, so I'm doing my PPL(H) on them. I
    >know everybody's got their views on the pro and cons of this compared to the
    >R22 but in the end for me it came down to local convenience.

    I don't care for the 300.. Probably due to the majority of my time
    being in the Robbies.. Flying the 300 under the hood has been
    frustrating for me due to the "quirks" of the ugly little bugger, but
    I'm slowly getting better. The one thing I don't like is I can't
    really go anywhere because of the lack of speed in the thing so I end
    up shooting the same 3 approaches all the time. The few times I've
    booked the R44 for instrument training were nice because we had the
    speed to get to another airport and get in some PIC X-country at the
    same time.

    >So, it's a fine Oxfordshire autumn morning and I turn up for the first
    >lesson, hoping to get a second in today if there's an aircraft's available.
    >The sun's out, wind is 5 kts, and barring a bit of low haze it looks like
    >it's going to be a nice day.
    >
    >The instructor does the initial pre-flight, startup and climb-out to the
    >west as I shadow him on the checklists and controls. We rise through a
    >turbulent layer (could be a small temperature inversion as the haze is
    >suddenly clear), and it's over to me for control familiarisation. Cyclic is
    >instantly familiar, and I do some turns while trying to keep the airspeed
    >constant by adjusting the nose attitude. Not too bad, but the instructor
    >knows I've a lot of r/c heli, a few hours of fixed-wing, and a lot of sim
    >time.
    >
    >Next I'm given the collective and make the power adjustments as the
    >instructor demos climbs and descents. Easy enough. Then I've got the
    >pedals and things are a little more complicated. As the instructor changes
    >the power I'm having to compensate on the anti-torque, at this point
    >over-correcting and occasionally getting into a bit of a yawing oscillation,
    >but I get it under control. I try a bit of control co-ordination. I can see
    >it's going to be a challenge mastering them all at once, throughout the
    >flight envelope.

    In just a few hours you won't even think about what you're doing..
    You'll just do it.

    >We land, grab a sarnie and de-brief. He's happy, says I did really well. I
    >didn't find any of it too taxing, and I've still got a grin on my face 20
    >minutes later.

    It's a kick in the ass isn't it?? Too bad this addiction costs more
    than cocaine or heroin.. hehehe

    >The 300's free until late afternoon, so we head out again. This time I do
    >the checklists and startup, and do the pick-up to where we're light on the
    >skids. The instructor hover-taxies us out across the active to the heli
    >practice area on the field, and from there takes us west again away from the
    >airport. This is where it got interesting! I did turns again, this time
    >handling the collective, pedals and throttle on my own. Happy with that we
    >then did climbs and descents, again with me do al the attitude, power, trim
    >inputs, overspeeding the engine a few times! I'm not having trouble with
    >knowing what inputs I need to make, the difficulty is knowing how much I
    >need to do and learning the "feel" for the machine. A couple of times I had
    >to think twice about which way the throttle works, and it caught me out at
    >least once when I lowered the collective, and the throttle and the engine
    >rpm increased, and I reacted by twisting the wrong way. No hassle though,
    >only slightly above the red, and I corrected once I'm mentally kiced myself.
    >
    >Climbs and descents went well, so on to climbing and descending turns. This
    >was 2 hours into the days flying and I was starting to feel a bit full.
    >Still as enthusiastic as hell, but I began to realise the values of breaks
    >to let it all sink in. Still, I got the hang of them, and got to the point
    >where I don't need to think attitude, power, trim, and just do it, otherwise
    >I too busy thinking about the order in which to do things rather than
    >watching what's actually happening.

    So, can we count on a blow-by-blow of your progress like I did with my
    PPH?? That would be very cool to read another's experiences as he
    trains.

    >Anyway, back to base for a coffee and debrief again. The instructor thinks
    >I did really well and reckons if I do 4 to 5 hours a week I should breeze
    >through it. Not sure how much of that is genuine, and how much is
    >encouragement to a newbie, but I came away pleased with myself.
    >Unfortunately, I can't go up again until next Wednesday due to other
    >commitments, and I can't wait!!

    Ah, the ups and downs of helicopter flying.. Somedays you'll feel
    like you flew extremely well and the next time up you'll be hard
    pressed to keep the thing at a given airspeed, much less hold heading
    and altitude at the same time.

    Glad you finally got started Simon. I know you've been talking about
    it for several months. Dunno how much help I can be, but if you've
    got questions, feel free to drop me a line. I *might* remember some
    of that VFR stuff... :)
  3. Archived from groups: rec.aviation.rotorcraft,alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

    "The OTHER Kevin in San Diego" <skiddz "AT" adelphia "DOT" net> wrote in
    message news:ian0i154aqvtgl0kp6tave171tv5nihopm@4ax.com...
    > So, can we count on a blow-by-blow of your progress like I did with my
    > PPH?? That would be very cool to read another's experiences as he
    > trains.

    Well, I'd like to think I could do that, but to be honest I doubt I'll
    remember my lessons in quite as much detail as you did, (i.e. how many
    sugars Q has in his coffee, etc!) But I'll try. It was funny when I was
    writing that report, I struggled to remember the exact exercises I'd done in
    the morning and what in the afternoon. It just all kind of blended
    together.

    Si
  4. Archived from groups: rec.aviation.rotorcraft,alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

    "boB" <akita_77REMOVECAPS@yahoo.Xcom> wrote in message
    news:BEMTe.241000$gL1.92333@tornado.texas.rr.com...
    > Usually an instructor will give some positive feedback to the student
    > but they would never say that you should "breeze through it" unless they
    > meant it. So it sounds very good for you....

    Well, I'm keeping my fingers crossed, but I know there'll be times when
    something just doesn't come together and I struggle. I'm doing this for the
    challenge, so to be honest, that's what I want!

    The hardest part for me is probably going to be doing all the study that JAA
    insists on. I'm not good at studying anymore. My day job is all sitting
    down, thinking and concentrating hard, so I don't have a lot of mental
    energy left at the end of the day. And I hope sooner or later that the
    gibberish I hear over the headphones begins to sound legible, cos it doesn't
    at the moment!

    Si
  5. Archived from groups: rec.aviation.rotorcraft,alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

    On Thu, 8 Sep 2005 18:50:54 +0100, "Simon Robbins"
    <simon@NOSPAMsjrobbins.demon.co.uk> wrote:

    >"The OTHER Kevin in San Diego" <skiddz "AT" adelphia "DOT" net> wrote in
    >message news:ian0i154aqvtgl0kp6tave171tv5nihopm@4ax.com...
    >> So, can we count on a blow-by-blow of your progress like I did with my
    >> PPH?? That would be very cool to read another's experiences as he
    >> trains.
    >
    >Well, I'd like to think I could do that, but to be honest I doubt I'll
    >remember my lessons in quite as much detail as you did, (i.e. how many
    >sugars Q has in his coffee, etc!) But I'll try. It was funny when I was
    >writing that report, I struggled to remember the exact exercises I'd done in
    >the morning and what in the afternoon. It just all kind of blended
    >together.

    hehe, I'd forgotten about Q's coffee. Dunno where he is anymore.
    Rumor has it he up and quit a few weeks ago. Don't know for sure 'cuz
    I haven't been at that school since April.

    Any details you can remember would be cool. I read all my other posts
    today and man did the memories come rushing back.. Just passed 110
    hours yesterday so I'm "over the hump" in hours required to instruct
    but after today's instrument mini-oral, I realize I *really* need to
    hit the books hard in the coming weeks.

    Even if you don't get to post, I wish you luck with your studies.
    Difficult at times, but a helluva lot of fun.
  6. Archived from groups: rec.aviation.rotorcraft,alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

    On Thu, 8 Sep 2005 19:18:19 +0100, "Simon Robbins"
    <simon@NOSPAMsjrobbins.demon.co.uk> wrote:

    >"boB" <akita_77REMOVECAPS@yahoo.Xcom> wrote in message
    >news:BEMTe.241000$gL1.92333@tornado.texas.rr.com...
    >> Usually an instructor will give some positive feedback to the student
    >> but they would never say that you should "breeze through it" unless they
    >> meant it. So it sounds very good for you....
    >
    >Well, I'm keeping my fingers crossed, but I know there'll be times when
    >something just doesn't come together and I struggle. I'm doing this for the
    >challenge, so to be honest, that's what I want!
    >
    >The hardest part for me is probably going to be doing all the study that JAA
    >insists on. I'm not good at studying anymore. My day job is all sitting
    >down, thinking and concentrating hard, so I don't have a lot of mental
    >energy left at the end of the day. And I hope sooner or later that the
    >gibberish I hear over the headphones begins to sound legible, cos it doesn't
    >at the moment!

    I forgot to mention this when I posted my responses last night. Flash
    Cards. They helped me tremendously. I picked up about a thousand 3x5
    cards (Dunno what the metric equivalent is. <grin>) and started
    writing questions on one side and the answers on the back.

    I'd have my kids quiz me in the car, at dinner, wherever we were. My
    10 year old learned almost as much as I did. heheh

    I'm well into my 2nd stack of a thousand cards as I do my instrument
    and commercial work...
  7. Archived from groups: rec.aviation.rotorcraft,alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

    "The OTHER Kevin in San Diego" <skiddz "AT" adelphia "DOT" net> wrote in
    message news:8012i1pe51avjjtpvae2cidn30vlshs73l@4ax.com...
    > On Thu, 8 Sep 2005 18:50:54 +0100, "Simon Robbins"
    > <simon@NOSPAMsjrobbins.demon.co.uk> wrote:
    >
    >>"The OTHER Kevin in San Diego" <skiddz "AT" adelphia "DOT" net> wrote in
    >>message news:ian0i154aqvtgl0kp6tave171tv5nihopm@4ax.com...
    >>> So, can we count on a blow-by-blow of your progress like I did with my
    >>> PPH?? That would be very cool to read another's experiences as he
    >>> trains.
    >>
    >>Well, I'd like to think I could do that, but to be honest I doubt I'll
    >>remember my lessons in quite as much detail as you did, (i.e. how many
    >>sugars Q has in his coffee, etc!) But I'll try. It was funny when I was
    >>writing that report, I struggled to remember the exact exercises I'd done
    >>in
    >>the morning and what in the afternoon. It just all kind of blended
    >>together.
    >
    > hehe, I'd forgotten about Q's coffee. Dunno where he is anymore.
    > Rumor has it he up and quit a few weeks ago.

    Probably got an earful off a student that didn't take to him:-))

    Don't know for sure 'cuz
    > I haven't been at that school since April.

    So, you're a "Love 'em and leave 'em" type of guy eh? Get what you can, then
    cast 'em aside like so much flotsam. :-))


    --
    Beav

    Reply to "beavis dot original at ntlworld dot com" (with the obvious
    changes)
  8. Archived from groups: rec.aviation.rotorcraft,alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

    On Fri, 9 Sep 2005 16:34:57 +0100, "Beav"
    <beavis.original@ntlwoxoorld.com> wrote:


    >> hehe, I'd forgotten about Q's coffee. Dunno where he is anymore.
    >> Rumor has it he up and quit a few weeks ago.
    >
    >Probably got an earful off a student that didn't take to him:-))

    Dunno the whole story and the bits and pieces of what I am hearing
    seem to indicate there was a falling out with management. (Not
    surprising since that's exactly why I left that school)

    > Don't know for sure 'cuz
    >> I haven't been at that school since April.
    >
    >So, you're a "Love 'em and leave 'em" type of guy eh? Get what you can, then
    >cast 'em aside like so much flotsam. :-))

    Never "loved" that school and thought it was a good thing, but having
    been out of there for 5 months and training elsewhere, I can say for
    certain the move was a very good choice. (Not to mention the new
    school is a 3 mile drive from work or home and the old as 43 miles
    each way. - plus the chief pilot has something like 20,000 hours in
    helicopters)
  9. Archived from groups: rec.aviation.rotorcraft,alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

    "The OTHER Kevin in San Diego" <skiddz "AT" adelphia "DOT" net> wrote in
    message news:8012i1pe51avjjtpvae2cidn30vlshs73l@4ax.com...
    > Just passed 110 hours yesterday so I'm "over the hump" in hours required
    to instruct

    Wish it was that low over here. You need 250 hours before you can do the
    instructor course under JAR!!

    Si
  10. Archived from groups: rec.aviation.rotorcraft,alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

    On Fri, 9 Sep 2005 20:25:10 +0100, "Simon Robbins"
    <simon@NOSPAMsjrobbins.demon.co.uk> wrote:

    >"The OTHER Kevin in San Diego" <skiddz "AT" adelphia "DOT" net> wrote in
    >message news:8012i1pe51avjjtpvae2cidn30vlshs73l@4ax.com...
    >> Just passed 110 hours yesterday so I'm "over the hump" in hours required
    >to instruct
    >
    >Wish it was that low over here. You need 250 hours before you can do the
    >instructor course under JAR!!

    Wow! Only need 200 here in the states... I might have to get hold of
    the 2005 regs for your part of the planet and see how they compare to
    ours..
  11. Archived from groups: rec.aviation.rotorcraft,alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

    "The OTHER Kevin in San Diego" <skiddz "AT" adelphia "DOT" net> wrote in
    message news:4hj4i193ut6hghaptohmt6v9r3mt03qbu4@4ax.com...
    > Wow! Only need 200 here in the states... I might have to get hold of
    > the 2005 regs for your part of the planet and see how they compare to
    > ours..

    The regs on licences and priveledges are abbreviated here:
    www.caa.co.uk/docs/33/LASORS.PDF
    Lasors is the bible for UK pilots.

    Si
  12. Archived from groups: rec.aviation.rotorcraft,alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

    On Sat, 10 Sep 2005 12:44:33 +0100, "Simon Robbins"
    <simon@NOSPAMsjrobbins.demon.co.uk> wrote:

    >"The OTHER Kevin in San Diego" <skiddz "AT" adelphia "DOT" net> wrote in
    >message news:4hj4i193ut6hghaptohmt6v9r3mt03qbu4@4ax.com...
    >> Wow! Only need 200 here in the states... I might have to get hold of
    >> the 2005 regs for your part of the planet and see how they compare to
    >> ours..
    >
    >The regs on licences and priveledges are abbreviated here:
    >www.caa.co.uk/docs/33/LASORS.PDF
    >Lasors is the bible for UK pilots.

    Cool.. Gonna take a look at that later this afternoon. (Gotta knock
    a few things off my "honey-do" list 1st.. heheh)
  13. Archived from groups: rec.aviation.rotorcraft,alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

    "The OTHER Kevin in San Diego" <skiddz "AT" adelphia "DOT" net> wrote in
    message news:k9j4i15q3p166codkb0oooa6vtjbfpmjbc@4ax.com...
    > On Fri, 9 Sep 2005 16:34:57 +0100, "Beav"
    > <beavis.original@ntlwoxoorld.com> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>> hehe, I'd forgotten about Q's coffee. Dunno where he is anymore.
    >>> Rumor has it he up and quit a few weeks ago.
    >>
    >>Probably got an earful off a student that didn't take to him:-))
    >
    > Dunno the whole story and the bits and pieces of what I am hearing
    > seem to indicate there was a falling out with management. (Not
    > surprising since that's exactly why I left that school)

    I remember you mentioning the odd prob.
    >
    >> Don't know for sure 'cuz
    >>> I haven't been at that school since April.
    >>
    >>So, you're a "Love 'em and leave 'em" type of guy eh? Get what you can,
    >>then
    >>cast 'em aside like so much flotsam. :-))
    >
    > Never "loved" that school and thought it was a good thing, but having
    > been out of there for 5 months and training elsewhere, I can say for
    > certain the move was a very good choice. (Not to mention the new
    > school is a 3 mile drive from work or home and the old as 43 miles
    > each way.

    That's always a good thing. You can even see the weather from your bed :-)

    - plus the chief pilot has something like 20,000 hours in
    > helicopters)

    He must've used up all his luck by now:)


    --
    Beav

    Reply to "beavis dot original at ntlworld dot com" (with the obvious
    changes)

    >
    >
  14. Archived from groups: rec.aviation.rotorcraft,alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

    On Sun, 11 Sep 2005 01:14:18 +0100, "Beav"
    <beavis.original@ntlwoxoorld.com> wrote:


    >I remember you mentioning the odd prob.

    As soon as I get my refund (Which I *STILL* haven't received) I'll be
    posting all the gory details....

    >That's always a good thing. You can even see the weather from your bed :-)

    I have the airport's ATIS on my speed dial. Just press 1# and I'm
    connected.

    > - plus the chief pilot has something like 20,000 hours in
    >> helicopters)
    >
    >He must've used up all his luck by now:)

    When I got my sign-off to fly their R22s under my ticket, I had to go
    do autos with him. He flew the 1st one with his left hand on the
    cyclic and his right hand on MY collective and did a full down with a
    setdown gentler than my setdowns with power.

    The man can fly the hell out of a helicopter (And he's a helluva nice
    guy to boot!)

    I've heard rumors he autos his MD500 to the trolley he uses to cart
    the thing in and out of the hangar with. I'd love to see that...
  15. Archived from groups: rec.aviation.rotorcraft,alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

    "The OTHER Kevin in San Diego" <skiddz "AT" adelphia "DOT" net> wrote in
    message news:uib7i1p8kl6gali1uelocbuuh2kbhnskon@4ax.com...
    > On Sun, 11 Sep 2005 01:14:18 +0100, "Beav"
    > <beavis.original@ntlwoxoorld.com> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>I remember you mentioning the odd prob.
    >
    > As soon as I get my refund (Which I *STILL* haven't received) I'll be
    > posting all the gory details....

    I wait with bated breath.
    >
    >>That's always a good thing. You can even see the weather from your bed :-)
    >
    > I have the airport's ATIS on my speed dial. Just press 1# and I'm
    > connected.

    You're beoming an anorak you are :-)

    >
    >> - plus the chief pilot has something like 20,000 hours in
    >>> helicopters)
    >>
    >>He must've used up all his luck by now:)
    >
    > When I got my sign-off to fly their R22s under my ticket, I had to go
    > do autos with him. He flew the 1st one with his left hand on the
    > cyclic and his right hand on MY collective and did a full down with a
    > setdown gentler than my setdowns with power.

    Bastard:-) A friend of mine is an instructor on R22,'s and even with close
    to 2000 hours insrucing on them, he still hates doing full down auto's when
    he demo's them for students. He's about to convert to Enstroms now though,
    and they auto a lot more easily.

    >
    > The man can fly the hell out of a helicopter (And he's a helluva nice
    > guy to boot!)

    Looks like a damed good combination.

    >
    > I've heard rumors he autos his MD500 to the trolley he uses to cart
    > the thing in and out of the hangar with. I'd love to see that...

    I have another pal in Sweden who used to do the same thing with both his
    Bell 47G and his Enstrom. The cart had two lines painted on it (one for the
    left skid, the other for the front cross strut) and was never more than half
    an inch off being dead centre when he landed. Very impressive. He had a
    (home fitted) gas strut that held the door open on his Enstrom and he
    unlatched the door as he was auto-ing, then leaned out and just looked at
    the cart. Put the shits up me when I first experienced it, but he was GOOD,
    so I got used to it.

    Mind you, he's another guy that doesn't fly heli's anymore. He bought a
    float plane (lots of places to land in Sweden in one of those) and now
    enjoys much cheaper thrills.


    --
    Beav

    Reply to "beavis dot original at ntlworld dot com" (with the obvious
    changes)
  16. Archived from groups: rec.aviation.rotorcraft,alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

    On Wed, 14 Sep 2005 15:49:49 +0100, "Beav"
    <beavis.original@ntlwoxoorld.com> wrote:


    >> As soon as I get my refund (Which I *STILL* haven't received) I'll be
    >> posting all the gory details....
    >
    >I wait with bated breath.

    Like you have any other kind??? hehehe

    >>>That's always a good thing. You can even see the weather from your bed :-)
    >>
    >> I have the airport's ATIS on my speed dial. Just press 1# and I'm
    >> connected.
    >
    >You're beoming an anorak you are :-)

    OK, Ya lost me there... The only meaning of anorak I'm aware of is
    something like a jacket.. I guess you could be inferring I'm
    flatulent (i.e a "windbreaker") or I'm taking the wind out of your
    sales.. I wish you Brits would speak English... heehhe

    >Bastard:-) A friend of mine is an instructor on R22,'s and even with close
    >to 2000 hours insrucing on them, he still hates doing full down auto's when
    >he demo's them for students. He's about to convert to Enstroms now though,
    >and they auto a lot more easily.

    I don't care for autos in the R22 either. Things happen way too quick
    in 'em. Now the R44 is another story entirely....

    >> The man can fly the hell out of a helicopter (And he's a helluva nice
    >> guy to boot!)
    >
    >Looks like a damed good combination.

    Yep. Gonna get my R44 sign-off this weekend with him. Once that's
    done, I've promised my kids a ride for the $1000 lunch.. Looking
    forward to flying wit him 'cuz he's such a wealth of knowledge it's
    not even funny. I'd love to work for/with him once I get my CFI...

    >I have another pal in Sweden who used to do the same thing with both his
    >Bell 47G and his Enstrom. The cart had two lines painted on it (one for the
    >left skid, the other for the front cross strut) and was never more than half
    >an inch off being dead centre when he landed. Very impressive. He had a
    >(home fitted) gas strut that held the door open on his Enstrom and he
    >unlatched the door as he was auto-ing, then leaned out and just looked at
    >the cart. Put the shits up me when I first experienced it, but he was GOOD,
    >so I got used to it.

    That'd be cool to see in either case, much cooler to be IN the thing
    when it was done. I wonder if Rocky can do that. :)

    >Mind you, he's another guy that doesn't fly heli's anymore. He bought a
    >float plane (lots of places to land in Sweden in one of those) and now
    >enjoys much cheaper thrills.

    I can't afford even the cheap thrills... Although I'd love to have a
    Lancair.. :)
  17. Archived from groups: rec.aviation.rotorcraft,alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

    "The OTHER Kevin in San Diego" <skiddz "AT" adelphia "DOT" net> wrote in
    message news:hnjgi1lto8ndp4o7180rnsrjfj5jfhlnl2@4ax.com...
    > OK, Ya lost me there... The only meaning of anorak I'm aware of is
    > something like a jacket.. I guess you could be inferring I'm
    > flatulent (i.e a "windbreaker") or I'm taking the wind out of your
    > sales.. I wish you Brits would speak English... heehhe

    Heh-heh... Got to love the subtleties of the English language as spoken by
    the English. Reminds me of when I lived in Canada and my friends would
    borrow my UK motorcycle magazines: "I don't get it. They rave about how
    good this bike is, then say it's the bollocks... Doesn't bollocks mean
    bad?" I gave them the whole treatise on the word and found it's got about
    six different meanings, most of which are contextual. But in this case,
    you're right: Anorak is a type of jacket. But it's the most unfashionaly
    uncool style of jacket you could have. The kind of lightweight thin (often
    blue) plastic that folds up into it's own pocket allowing you to carry it
    around strapped to your belt for that *really* uncool look. The term's used
    to describe someone who's obsessive about their subject, (often one that
    bores everyone else within range, like train spotting.) It's most commonly
    used in jest, to imply someone just knows that little too much. Someone who
    spends all day on their computer (and waffles to anyone who'll listen about
    Linux, or memorises aircraft specifications, or football statistics could
    all be called Anoraks.

    Si
  18. Archived from groups: rec.aviation.rotorcraft,alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

    On Wed, 14 Sep 2005 23:31:15 +0100, "Simon Robbins"
    <simon@NOSPAMsjrobbins.demon.co.uk> wrote:

    >"The OTHER Kevin in San Diego" <skiddz "AT" adelphia "DOT" net> wrote in
    >message news:hnjgi1lto8ndp4o7180rnsrjfj5jfhlnl2@4ax.com...
    >> OK, Ya lost me there... The only meaning of anorak I'm aware of is
    >> something like a jacket.. I guess you could be inferring I'm
    >> flatulent (i.e a "windbreaker") or I'm taking the wind out of your
    >> sales.. I wish you Brits would speak English... heehhe
    >
    >Heh-heh... Got to love the subtleties of the English language as spoken by
    >the English. Reminds me of when I lived in Canada and my friends would
    >borrow my UK motorcycle magazines: "I don't get it. They rave about how
    >good this bike is, then say it's the bollocks... Doesn't bollocks mean
    >bad?" I gave them the whole treatise on the word and found it's got about
    >six different meanings, most of which are contextual. But in this case,
    >you're right: Anorak is a type of jacket. But it's the most unfashionaly
    >uncool style of jacket you could have. The kind of lightweight thin (often
    >blue) plastic that folds up into it's own pocket allowing you to carry it
    >around strapped to your belt for that *really* uncool look. The term's used
    >to describe someone who's obsessive about their subject, (often one that
    >bores everyone else within range, like train spotting.) It's most commonly
    >used in jest, to imply someone just knows that little too much. Someone who
    >spends all day on their computer (and waffles to anyone who'll listen about
    >Linux, or memorises aircraft specifications, or football statistics could
    >all be called Anoraks.

    OK, now that begs the question.. (and shows my apparent ignorance)

    WTF is train spotting???

    Couldn't Beav have just said "you're a dork" or "you need to get out
    more often"?
  19. Archived from groups: rec.aviation.rotorcraft,alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

    > The OTHER Kevin in San Diego wrote:

    > WTF is train spotting???

    Kevin.... I'm shocked

    train spotting - standing by train tracks looking at trains

    plane spotting - hanging around airports looking at planes

    girl spotting - hanging around anywhere looking at chicks

    cop spotting - what drug dealers do when they are standing around
  20. Archived from groups: rec.aviation.rotorcraft,alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

    On Thu, 15 Sep 2005 03:15:57 GMT, Shiver <shiver@me_timbers.com>
    wrote:

    >> The OTHER Kevin in San Diego wrote:
    >
    >> WTF is train spotting???
    >
    >Kevin.... I'm shocked

    I'm not surprised. :)

    >train spotting - standing by train tracks looking at trains

    Sounds like fun... (uh huh)

    >plane spotting - hanging around airports looking at planes

    Do airshows count? I can't recall ever having just hung out at the
    airport looking at planes...

    >girl spotting - hanging around anywhere looking at chicks

    Pretty much every day.. I'm a guy.. hello???

    >cop spotting - what drug dealers do when they are standing around

    so.. would spot spotting be looking at dogs named Spot? hehehe
  21. Archived from groups: rec.aviation.rotorcraft,alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

    As I see it, the main problem is similar to 'You say tomahto, and I say
    tomayto.'
    In the UK we see an enormous amount of US media, films, TV, soaps etc. Our
    TV is almost overpowered by it, and we soon get to know American slang, even
    if we don't always use it.
    On the other hand, the US only screens a very small percentage of UK films
    and TV and so our contemporary slang is thus less familiar.

    We know what a geek and a dork is, but we call them anoraks. Bollocks is not
    good, but 'The dog's bollocks' is excellent !

    I reckon the Freeflow Bermuda Scenery is the dog's bollocks!

    Cheers,

    Quilly
  22. Archived from groups: rec.aviation.rotorcraft,alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

    On Thu, 15 Sep 2005 09:20:23 +0000 (UTC), "Quilljar"
    <wykehill-flightsim@yahoo.co.uk> wrote:

    >As I see it, the main problem is similar to 'You say tomahto, and I say
    >tomayto.'
    >In the UK we see an enormous amount of US media, films, TV, soaps etc. Our
    >TV is almost overpowered by it, and we soon get to know American slang, even
    >if we don't always use it.
    > On the other hand, the US only screens a very small percentage of UK films
    >and TV and so our contemporary slang is thus less familiar.
    >
    >We know what a geek and a dork is, but we call them anoraks. Bollocks is not
    >good, but 'The dog's bollocks' is excellent !
    >
    >I reckon the Freeflow Bermuda Scenery is the dog's bollocks!

    Those 2 I know.. But what exactly is a "bollock"?

    Now if we Yanks could get you Redcoats to stop putting that bloody "U"
    in color... :)
  23. Archived from groups: rec.aviation.rotorcraft,alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

    >
    > Those 2 I know.. But what exactly is a "bollock"?

    It's a long time since anyone asked me that!

    But it is simply a more colourful word for a testicle.

    --
    Cheers,

    Quilly

    Sorry, but an individual reply goes into my spam filter
  24. Archived from groups: rec.aviation.rotorcraft,alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

    "The OTHER Kevin in San Diego" <skiddz "AT" adelphia "DOT" net> wrote in
    message news:2q3ji11ja29m0031kitlfv03gu3rfsdlg9@4ax.com...
    > >train spotting - standing by train tracks looking at trains
    >
    > Sounds like fun... (uh huh)

    I remember from when I was a kid, as my dad was a "railway enthusiast",
    "train spotter" being considered a derogatory term if I recall correctly.
    Basically you can buy these little books with all the registration numbers
    of all the UK based trains. People travel the whole country just to track
    down or see by chance any engines they've not seen before. They then
    strike-off that reg in the book. (Yeah, I know. It doesn't make any
    rational sense...) I think plane spotters kind of do the same. Girl
    spotters, well yeah. Again, it only counts if you get their numbers!! :^)

    Si
  25. Archived from groups: rec.aviation.rotorcraft,alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

    On Thu, 15 Sep 2005 17:52:50 +0100, Simon Robbins wrote:

    > I remember from when I was a kid, as my dad was a "railway enthusiast",
    > "train spotter" being considered a derogatory term if I recall correctly.
    > Basically you can buy these little books with all the registration numbers
    > of all the UK based trains. People travel the whole country just to track
    > down or see by chance any engines they've not seen before. They then
    > strike-off that reg in the book. (Yeah, I know. It doesn't make any
    > rational sense...) I think plane spotters kind of do the same. Girl
    > spotters, well yeah. Again, it only counts if you get their numbers!! :^)

    Well, it takes all kinds to make the world interesting. Did you know that
    there are actually people who make a hobby out of finding and documenting
    navaids? The travel around and track down NDBs, VORs and other such
    "interesting" things... <g>

    Bill
  26. Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

    "Bill Leaming" <n4gix@comcast.net> wrote in message
    news:1pi2gnrjwa43b.2nwomi2me8pz$.dlg@40tude.net...
    > Well, it takes all kinds to make the world interesting. Did you know that
    > there are actually people who make a hobby out of finding and documenting
    > navaids? The travel around and track down NDBs, VORs and other such
    > "interesting" things... <g>

    They'd be practicing IFR students though, right?

    Si
  27. Archived from groups: rec.aviation.rotorcraft,alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

    On Thu, 15 Sep 2005 17:52:50 +0100, "Simon Robbins"
    <simon@NOSPAMsjrobbins.demon.co.uk> wrote:

    >"The OTHER Kevin in San Diego" <skiddz "AT" adelphia "DOT" net> wrote in
    >message news:2q3ji11ja29m0031kitlfv03gu3rfsdlg9@4ax.com...
    >> >train spotting - standing by train tracks looking at trains
    >>
    >> Sounds like fun... (uh huh)
    >
    >I remember from when I was a kid, as my dad was a "railway enthusiast",
    >"train spotter" being considered a derogatory term if I recall correctly.
    >Basically you can buy these little books with all the registration numbers
    >of all the UK based trains. People travel the whole country just to track
    >down or see by chance any engines they've not seen before. They then
    >strike-off that reg in the book. (Yeah, I know. It doesn't make any
    >rational sense...) I think plane spotters kind of do the same. Girl
    >spotters, well yeah. Again, it only counts if you get their numbers!! :^)

    The wife will have my number if I get any girl's numbers.. lol
  28. Archived from groups: alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

    On Thu, 15 Sep 2005 19:22:01 +0100, Simon Robbins wrote:

    > "Bill Leaming" <n4gix@comcast.net> wrote in message
    > news:1pi2gnrjwa43b.2nwomi2me8pz$.dlg@40tude.net...
    >> Well, it takes all kinds to make the world interesting. Did you know that
    >> there are actually people who make a hobby out of finding and documenting
    >> navaids? The travel around and track down NDBs, VORs and other such
    >> "interesting" things... <g>
    >
    > They'd be practicing IFR students though, right?

    Oddly enough, most of 'em aren't even pilots, much less interested in
    aviation per se! They do their "hunting" with direction finders and ground
    vehicles. They "enjoy the chase" and the "thrill" of finding their
    objective(s).

    Bill
  29. Archived from groups: rec.aviation.rotorcraft,alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

    "The OTHER Kevin in San Diego" <skiddz "AT" adelphia "DOT" net> wrote in
    message news:hnjgi1lto8ndp4o7180rnsrjfj5jfhlnl2@4ax.com...
    > On Wed, 14 Sep 2005 15:49:49 +0100, "Beav"
    > <beavis.original@ntlwoxoorld.com> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>> As soon as I get my refund (Which I *STILL* haven't received) I'll be
    >>> posting all the gory details....
    >>
    >>I wait with bated breath.
    >
    > Like you have any other kind??? hehehe

    Garlic tonight:)
    >
    >>>>That's always a good thing. You can even see the weather from your bed
    >>>>:-)
    >>>
    >>> I have the airport's ATIS on my speed dial. Just press 1# and I'm
    >>> connected.
    >>
    >>You're beoming an anorak you are :-)
    >
    > OK, Ya lost me there... The only meaning of anorak I'm aware of is
    > something like a jacket..

    Precisiely that. And people who wear them are usually some kind of nerdy
    pencil collecting, speed dial using train spotters:-))

    I guess you could be inferring I'm
    > flatulent (i.e a "windbreaker") or I'm taking the wind out of your
    > sales..

    I'm selling nowt this week.

    I wish you Brits would speak English... heehhe

    I wish you Yanks could SPELL in english:-))) (Sails)

    >
    >>Bastard:-) A friend of mine is an instructor on R22,'s and even with close
    >>to 2000 hours insrucing on them, he still hates doing full down auto's
    >>when
    >>he demo's them for students. He's about to convert to Enstroms now though,
    >>and they auto a lot more easily.
    >
    > I don't care for autos in the R22 either. Things happen way too quick
    > in 'em. Now the R44 is another story entirely....

    He (my pal) was out in a 44 this week. Not doing the flying, but just
    enjoying the ride. He thinks it's a world away from his 22.

    >
    >>> The man can fly the hell out of a helicopter (And he's a helluva nice
    >>> guy to boot!)
    >>
    >>Looks like a damed good combination.
    >
    > Yep. Gonna get my R44 sign-off this weekend with him. Once that's
    > done, I've promised my kids a ride for the $1000 lunch.. Looking
    > forward to flying wit him 'cuz he's such a wealth of knowledge it's
    > not even funny. I'd love to work for/with him once I get my CFI...

    Get your request in now, or some other bugger will get in there before you.

    >
    >>I have another pal in Sweden who used to do the same thing with both his
    >>Bell 47G and his Enstrom. The cart had two lines painted on it (one for
    >>the
    >>left skid, the other for the front cross strut) and was never more than
    >>half
    >>an inch off being dead centre when he landed. Very impressive. He had a
    >>(home fitted) gas strut that held the door open on his Enstrom and he
    >>unlatched the door as he was auto-ing, then leaned out and just looked at
    >>the cart. Put the shits up me when I first experienced it, but he was
    >>GOOD,
    >>so I got used to it.
    >
    > That'd be cool to see in either case, much cooler to be IN the thing
    > when it was done. I wonder if Rocky can do that. :)

    I wouldn't doubt it for a minute. As for it being cool, it is, but only
    after you get the idea it's not all going to end in tears.

    >
    >>Mind you, he's another guy that doesn't fly heli's anymore. He bought a
    >>float plane (lots of places to land in Sweden in one of those) and now
    >>enjoys much cheaper thrills.
    >
    > I can't afford even the cheap thrills... Although I'd love to have a
    > Lancair.. :)

    I can't tell you which model of plank he has, but it'll be getting plenty of
    use, I know THAT much at least. Too many aircraft spend too much time sat
    sitting, but his never do.


    --
    Beav

    Reply to "beavis dot original at ntlworld dot com" (with the obvious
    changes)
  30. Archived from groups: rec.aviation.rotorcraft,alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

    On Sat, 17 Sep 2005 02:08:18 +0100, "Beav"
    <beavis.original@ntlwoxoorld.com> wrote:


    >Garlic tonight:)

    Lucky Gar. heheh


    >Precisiely that. And people who wear them are usually some kind of nerdy
    >pencil collecting, speed dial using train spotters:-))

    Dork is much easier to spell. :)

    >I'm selling nowt this week.
    >
    > I wish you Brits would speak English... heehhe
    >
    >I wish you Yanks could SPELL in english:-))) (Sails)

    Maybe both for one low, low price!

    >He (my pal) was out in a 44 this week. Not doing the flying, but just
    >enjoying the ride. He thinks it's a world away from his 22.

    Yeah, they're like mini Jet Rangers... My only bitch with 'em is they
    don't like to slow down to land.. ehhe

    >Get your request in now, or some other bugger will get in there before you.

    I'm already working that angle.. Gonna be a while before I can get to
    my CFI. This instrument ticket is kicking my ass...


    >> That'd be cool to see in either case, much cooler to be IN the thing
    >> when it was done. I wonder if Rocky can do that. :)
    >
    >I wouldn't doubt it for a minute. As for it being cool, it is, but only
    >after you get the idea it's not all going to end in tears.

    Well, there IS that..

    >I can't tell you which model of plank he has, but it'll be getting plenty of
    >use, I know THAT much at least. Too many aircraft spend too much time sat
    >sitting, but his never do.

    Sounds like I guy I used to do some work for. Made a bundle in the
    dot-com days and went out and bought a brand new Cessna 182. Got his
    commercial and instrument tickets and flew almost daily - for about 6
    weeks. Now the plane sits and gets washed every other weekend by the
    line handlers.. He hasn't flown in almost a year.. What a waste of
    an aircraft..
  31. Archived from groups: rec.aviation.rotorcraft,alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

    "Simon Robbins" <simon@NOSPAMsjrobbins.demon.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:dga8bp$cas$1$830fa79d@news.demon.co.uk...
    > "The OTHER Kevin in San Diego" <skiddz "AT" adelphia "DOT" net> wrote in
    > message news:hnjgi1lto8ndp4o7180rnsrjfj5jfhlnl2@4ax.com...
    >> OK, Ya lost me there... The only meaning of anorak I'm aware of is
    >> something like a jacket.. I guess you could be inferring I'm
    >> flatulent (i.e a "windbreaker") or I'm taking the wind out of your
    >> sales.. I wish you Brits would speak English... heehhe
    >
    > Heh-heh... Got to love the subtleties of the English language as spoken
    > by
    > the English. Reminds me of when I lived in Canada and my friends would
    > borrow my UK motorcycle magazines: "I don't get it. They rave about how
    > good this bike is, then say it's the bollocks... Doesn't bollocks mean
    > bad?"

    It's "The bollocks" when it's good. Something that's "Bollocks" on it's own
    is bad, but something that's "THE bollocks" or "the dog's bollocks" is good.
    A LOAD of bollcks is te same a "it's bullshit".

    Here endeth the first English lesson, which was actually the dogs goolies of
    a lesson, even if I do say so myself:-)


    I gave them the whole treatise on the word and found it's got about
    > six different meanings, most of which are contextual. But in this case,
    > you're right: Anorak is a type of jacket. But it's the most unfashionaly
    > uncool style of jacket you could have. The kind of lightweight thin (often
    > blue) plastic that folds up into it's own pocket allowing you to carry it
    > around strapped to your belt for that *really* uncool look.

    The "Dwayne Dibbly" look. "Dwayne" is the Duke or Dork and stars in the
    occasional episode of "Red Dwarf". His anorack is to DIE for, as are his
    teeth. (You need to be a fan of course)

    The term's used
    > to describe someone who's obsessive about their subject, (often one that
    > bores everyone else within range, like train spotting.) It's most
    > commonly
    > used in jest, to imply someone just knows that little too much. Someone
    > who
    > spends all day on their computer (and waffles to anyone who'll listen
    > about
    > Linux, or memorises aircraft specifications, or football statistics could
    > all be called Anoraks.

    Indeed they could (are:-)


    --
    Beav

    Reply to "beavis dot original at ntlworld dot com" (with the obvious
    changes)
  32. Archived from groups: rec.aviation.rotorcraft,alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

    "The OTHER Kevin in San Diego" <skiddz "AT" adelphia "DOT" net> wrote in
    message news:6nihi1plqvsddmvsbibllvv90g5grpoivv@4ax.com...
    > On Wed, 14 Sep 2005 23:31:15 +0100, "Simon Robbins"
    > <simon@NOSPAMsjrobbins.demon.co.uk> wrote:
    >
    >>"The OTHER Kevin in San Diego" <skiddz "AT" adelphia "DOT" net> wrote in
    >>message news:hnjgi1lto8ndp4o7180rnsrjfj5jfhlnl2@4ax.com...
    >>> OK, Ya lost me there... The only meaning of anorak I'm aware of is
    >>> something like a jacket.. I guess you could be inferring I'm
    >>> flatulent (i.e a "windbreaker") or I'm taking the wind out of your
    >>> sales.. I wish you Brits would speak English... heehhe
    >>
    >>Heh-heh... Got to love the subtleties of the English language as spoken
    >>by
    >>the English. Reminds me of when I lived in Canada and my friends would
    >>borrow my UK motorcycle magazines: "I don't get it. They rave about how
    >>good this bike is, then say it's the bollocks... Doesn't bollocks mean
    >>bad?" I gave them the whole treatise on the word and found it's got about
    >>six different meanings, most of which are contextual. But in this case,
    >>you're right: Anorak is a type of jacket. But it's the most unfashionaly
    >>uncool style of jacket you could have. The kind of lightweight thin (often
    >>blue) plastic that folds up into it's own pocket allowing you to carry it
    >>around strapped to your belt for that *really* uncool look. The term's
    >>used
    >>to describe someone who's obsessive about their subject, (often one that
    >>bores everyone else within range, like train spotting.) It's most
    >>commonly
    >>used in jest, to imply someone just knows that little too much. Someone
    >>who
    >>spends all day on their computer (and waffles to anyone who'll listen
    >>about
    >>Linux, or memorises aircraft specifications, or football statistics could
    >>all be called Anoraks.
    >
    > OK, now that begs the question.. (and shows my apparent ignorance)
    >
    > WTF is train spotting???

    Ahhh, well there you go. Train spotting is an art, only to be undertaken
    whilst wearing an anorack and carrying a thermos flask and a plastic
    Tupperware box full of cheese sandwiches. And a pickled onion.

    It requires GREAT skill and fortitude as it entails spending endless hours
    standing (real train spotters never SIT) at the side of a well travelled
    railway track (or better still, at a train siding (depot to you blokes),
    taking note of the locomotive's number as it rumbles, speeds or slitheres
    by. This number is then checked against the numbers in the Train Spotter
    Reference Book, where once found, the number is actually UNDERLINED in the
    book. This can then be used to demonstrate to other train spotters that you
    spotted NUMBER 432186. That can be worth at least 2 pints down the boozer. A
    good train spoter will have at least 50 books all underlined in neat
    script:-)

    They are NOT obsessed:-)))


    >
    > Couldn't Beav have just said "you're a dork" or "you need to get out
    > more often"?

    "Dork" just doesn't cut it Kev. Sory, but anyone using a speed dialer is FAR
    FAR beyond the Dork stage:-)


    --
    Beav

    Reply to "beavis dot original at ntlworld dot com" (with the obvious
    changes)
  33. Archived from groups: rec.aviation.rotorcraft,alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

    On Sat, 17 Sep 2005 02:20:28 +0100, "Beav"
    <beavis.original@ntlwoxoorld.com> wrote:


    >Ahhh, well there you go. Train spotting is an art, only to be undertaken
    >whilst wearing an anorack and carrying a thermos flask and a plastic
    >Tupperware box full of cheese sandwiches. And a pickled onion.

    This just REEKS of personal experience..

    >It requires GREAT skill and fortitude as it entails spending endless hours
    >standing (real train spotters never SIT) at the side of a well travelled
    >railway track (or better still, at a train siding (depot to you blokes),
    >taking note of the locomotive's number as it rumbles, speeds or slitheres
    >by. This number is then checked against the numbers in the Train Spotter
    >Reference Book, where once found, the number is actually UNDERLINED in the
    >book. This can then be used to demonstrate to other train spotters that you
    >spotted NUMBER 432186. That can be worth at least 2 pints down the boozer. A
    >good train spoter will have at least 50 books all underlined in neat
    >script:-)

    I think I'd rather visit the dentist...

    >They are NOT obsessed:-)))

    Oh, not at all..

    >"Dork" just doesn't cut it Kev. Sory, but anyone using a speed dialer is FAR
    >FAR beyond the Dork stage:-)

    Yeah, well I'm a dork with a pilot's license then. hehehe
  34. Archived from groups: rec.aviation.rotorcraft,alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

    "The OTHER Kevin in San Diego" <skiddz "AT" adelphia "DOT" net> wrote in
    message news:2q3ji11ja29m0031kitlfv03gu3rfsdlg9@4ax.com...
    > On Thu, 15 Sep 2005 03:15:57 GMT, Shiver <shiver@me_timbers.com>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>> The OTHER Kevin in San Diego wrote:
    >>
    >>> WTF is train spotting???
    >>
    >>Kevin.... I'm shocked
    >
    > I'm not surprised. :)
    >
    >>train spotting - standing by train tracks looking at trains
    >
    > Sounds like fun... (uh huh)
    >
    >>plane spotting - hanging around airports looking at planes
    >
    > Do airshows count? I can't recall ever having just hung out at the
    > airport looking at planes...
    >
    >>girl spotting - hanging around anywhere looking at chicks
    >
    > Pretty much every day.. I'm a guy.. hello???
    >
    >>cop spotting - what drug dealers do when they are standing around
    >
    > so.. would spot spotting be looking at dogs named Spot? hehehe

    Nah, that'd be "zit" spotting.


    --
    Beav

    Reply to "beavis dot original at ntlworld dot com" (with the obvious
    changes)
  35. Archived from groups: rec.aviation.rotorcraft,alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

    "The OTHER Kevin in San Diego" <skiddz "AT" adelphia "DOT" net> wrote in
    message news:bormi1lkb8d9dk4b3n0lgb26784ggusrn5@4ax.com...
    > Now the plane sits and gets washed every other weekend by the
    > line handlers.. He hasn't flown in almost a year.. What a waste of
    > an aircraft..

    Sounds like my motorcycle. It needs about a grand spending on it.: major
    service, set of sticky tyres, new chain and sprockets, plus road tax (like
    the US license sticker but a good deal more expensive, naturally). Of
    course at the moment I measure everything from essential vehicle maintenance
    to chocolate bars in terms of fractions of flying hour costs, so it's just
    sitting there unloved, but shiny.

    Si
  36. Archived from groups: rec.aviation.rotorcraft,alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

    On Sat, 17 Sep 2005 11:41:14 +0100, "Simon Robbins"
    <simon@NOSPAMsjrobbins.demon.co.uk> wrote:

    >"The OTHER Kevin in San Diego" <skiddz "AT" adelphia "DOT" net> wrote in
    >message news:bormi1lkb8d9dk4b3n0lgb26784ggusrn5@4ax.com...
    >> Now the plane sits and gets washed every other weekend by the
    >> line handlers.. He hasn't flown in almost a year.. What a waste of
    >> an aircraft..
    >
    >Sounds like my motorcycle. It needs about a grand spending on it.: major
    >service, set of sticky tyres, new chain and sprockets, plus road tax (like
    >the US license sticker but a good deal more expensive, naturally). Of
    >course at the moment I measure everything from essential vehicle maintenance
    >to chocolate bars in terms of fractions of flying hour costs, so it's just
    >sitting there unloved, but shiny.

    Mine's kinda the opposite. I ride it pretty much everywhere and I'm
    amazed the things I've been able to stuff into my tail bag and
    bakcpack. Unfortunately, I doesn't get washed that often so as it
    sits right now, it's pretty grungy... Same with my truck.. It's got
    about 3 months of road grime on it.. but the windows are spotless.
    ehhehe
  37. Archived from groups: rec.aviation.rotorcraft,alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

    On Sun, 18 Sep 2005 01:05:24 +0100, "Beav"
    <beavis.original@ntlwoxoorld.com> wrote:


    >Donkey jackets back then. (we're talking 45 years ago)

    Damn.. You must remember when the Dead Sea was merely ill... when
    the Great Wall of China was merely so-so.. :)

    >I have a well blessed dentist in Sweden, and a very nice dental assistant
    >over here, but the Brit dentist's a bloke. Nice enough guy though and he's
    >helped me with this dentist phobia thing. He still nows better than come
    >anywhere NEAR me with a needle in his hand though.

    Ooh.. The swedish dentist... ehehhe


    >Just like my brother. Not like me. I'm a little on the obsessive side when
    >it comes to things being in their rightful place and having things cleaner
    >than they were when new:-)

    My office is a pig-sty. My kitchen is as organized as can be. Same
    with my garage. No room in there for anything, but everything is
    where it's supposed to be and very well organized.
  38. Archived from groups: rec.aviation.rotorcraft,alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

    "Simon Robbins" <simon@NOSPAMsjrobbins.demon.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:dggrsi$g51$1$8302bc10@news.demon.co.uk...
    > "The OTHER Kevin in San Diego" <skiddz "AT" adelphia "DOT" net> wrote in
    > message news:bormi1lkb8d9dk4b3n0lgb26784ggusrn5@4ax.com...
    >> Now the plane sits and gets washed every other weekend by the
    >> line handlers.. He hasn't flown in almost a year.. What a waste of
    >> an aircraft..
    >
    > Sounds like my motorcycle. It needs about a grand spending on it.: major
    > service, set of sticky tyres, new chain and sprockets, plus road tax (like
    > the US license sticker but a good deal more expensive, naturally).

    Isn't it just! (Don't mention gas prices Si, I couldn't handle another
    thread on that subject:-)

    I just put new tyres on my Zed 1000. Conti Race Attack's they are, and
    they're sticky as buggery. I'm off to a meeting tomorrow which'll give me a
    chance to give 'em a good scrubbing in.

    Of
    > course at the moment I measure everything from essential vehicle
    > maintenance
    > to chocolate bars in terms of fractions of flying hour costs, so it's just
    > sitting there unloved, but shiny.

    Mine's siting in the garage panting in anticipation of the ru out tomorrow.
    Well it COULD be panting from the caning it got today, I'm not exactly sure.
    The Zed is a superb bike for hooning around on and it's bloody addictive
    too.


    --
    Beav

    Reply to "beavis dot original at ntlworld dot com" (with the obvious
    changes)
  39. Archived from groups: rec.aviation.rotorcraft,alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

    "Beav" <beavis.original@ntlwoxoorld.com> wrote in message
    news:11ipcfv34su4771@news.supernews.com...
    > Mine's siting in the garage panting in anticipation of the ru out
    tomorrow.
    > Well it COULD be panting from the caning it got today, I'm not exactly
    sure.
    > The Zed is a superb bike for hooning around on and it's bloody addictive
    > too.

    Yeah, a couple of mates of mine had classic Z1000s. I can appreciate the
    classic beauty of the design, but I'm more of a rocket boy myself. Mine's a
    Ducati 748 with 853 big-bore and top-end blueprint. (Hence the
    ultra-expemsive service I can no longer afford to pay for!)

    Si
  40. Archived from groups: rec.aviation.rotorcraft,alt.games.microsoft.flight-sim (More info?)

    "Beav" <beavis.original@ntlwoxoorld.com> wrote in message
    news:11io6887visuqc1@news.supernews.com...
    > Are you kidding? I was an absessive train spotter when I was a kid. I
    lived
    > close by a MASSIVE siding, complete with all the maintenance sheds. (This
    > was in the steam days too) A day at the sheds was better than a day at
    > Disneyland for a train lover. All the building were destroyed when I was a
    > kid though, along with most of the local stations so it was a very short
    > obsession. Things don't get much better than riding on the footplate of
    "The
    > Royal Scotsman" when you're a steam driven kid.

    I spent most of my childhood being dragged around from Portsmouth to
    Doncaster, Newcastle to Crewe, all over the place by my dad in search of
    elusive engine numbers. I enjoyed it, as it was a day out with my dad,
    which looking back seemed quite rare. I loved the adventure of the travel,
    going somewhere I'd never been for a day with binoculars and a camera. My
    dad grew up in the steam age, and worked in his teens on the footplate of
    steam trains coaling the furnaces, before he joined the RAF. So I guess I
    can excuse his anorakism!

    Si
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