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Specific questions concerning memory cards and expansions ..

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Anonymous
a b } Memory
November 22, 2004 11:25:11 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

I have read quite a few posts on comparisons between mmc, sd, and cf memory
cards. From these I have been given a slightly mixed view as some posts
contradict others. These are the conclusions I have made and I want to know
if I am either missing something or if I am incorrect in my assumptions.

CF - faster than sd or mmc, less power consumption, cheaper. However they
are primarily used for expansions, although recently that has changed.
Despite this, the expansions that are cf are still cheaper than the sd
counterparts.

SD - slower than cf. Uses a secure method for unauthorized copying of data
and much smaller. However, much more expensive than cf cards. There are now
expansion packs that use sd, although they are more expensive than the cf
ones.

MMC - I know little of these except sd and mmc are related with one being a
type of the other.

I have a Dell Axim x50v which supports sd and cf cards. I want to buy a
large card, probably 1 GB, and a 802.11b wireless adapter. I assume the best
thing to do is to buy a cf memory card and a sdio wireless lan adapter. Are
the sdio wireless lan adapters slower than their cf counterparts much like
sd memory cards are slower than their cf counterparts? What is the
difference in speed and price in general? Really, what are the overall pros,
cons, write speeds, read speeds, access speeds (for wireless adapters), and
price differences between sd, cf, and mmc memory cards/wireless adapters
and/or other expansions? I know that is a huge question, but can anyone fill
me in? Thanks.

Andrew
Anonymous
a b } Memory
November 22, 2004 2:36:48 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

Andrew,
while correct that there are now peripheral devices that are in the form of
SD card, the fact is, that for the most part these devices are relatively
new and if you read back through the archives of this and other groups tend
to be problematic. For example, I have a CF wifi card and an SD wifi card.
The CF card connects first time, every time. the sd card is a 50/50
proposition at best. granted, that is just my experience, but I think you'll
find others who agree. as far as speed, I honestly don't think you will
notice any difference, during normal everyday usage on your device.
the "secure" part of SD, refers only to the little "lock" tab on the side of
the card, that write protects the card. it has nothing to do with any sort
of encryption. my advice is to also look at any other items you have or are
contemplating getting that might steer you towards one card or the other,
for example, my camera, my daughters mp3 player, and my wife's palm pilot
all us sd cards, so I tend to buy SD memory, and use the cf slot for
add-ons.

Andrew Smith" <jim@ascnetsolutions.com> wrote in message
news:o HNTyaJ0EHA.3820@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
| I have read quite a few posts on comparisons between mmc, sd, and cf
memory
| cards. From these I have been given a slightly mixed view as some posts
| contradict others. These are the conclusions I have made and I want to
know
| if I am either missing something or if I am incorrect in my assumptions.
|
| CF - faster than sd or mmc, less power consumption, cheaper. However they
| are primarily used for expansions, although recently that has changed.
| Despite this, the expansions that are cf are still cheaper than the sd
| counterparts.
|
| SD - slower than cf. Uses a secure method for unauthorized copying of data
| and much smaller. However, much more expensive than cf cards. There are
now
| expansion packs that use sd, although they are more expensive than the cf
| ones.
|
| MMC - I know little of these except sd and mmc are related with one being
a
| type of the other.
|
| I have a Dell Axim x50v which supports sd and cf cards. I want to buy a
| large card, probably 1 GB, and a 802.11b wireless adapter. I assume the
best
| thing to do is to buy a cf memory card and a sdio wireless lan adapter.
Are
| the sdio wireless lan adapters slower than their cf counterparts much like
| sd memory cards are slower than their cf counterparts? What is the
| difference in speed and price in general? Really, what are the overall
pros,
| cons, write speeds, read speeds, access speeds (for wireless adapters),
and
| price differences between sd, cf, and mmc memory cards/wireless adapters
| and/or other expansions? I know that is a huge question, but can anyone
fill
| me in? Thanks.
|
| Andrew
|
|
Anonymous
a b } Memory
November 22, 2004 4:14:59 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

Pretty accurate with the following additions;

The "Secure" part of SD is not implimented in pocketpc, so if a card has
it, the pocketpc will not be able to deal with the security issues...
The approach of vending content on "secure" cards has pretty much faded,
so, it should not be an issue.

MMC is essentially SD without the "secure" parts... so, mmc cards will
work identically to SD cards in a pocketpc slot... in fact, the slot
device is named "MMC..." on some pocketpc's

MMC faded a bit when SD became the media star, but it is returning in
higher capacities and lower prices in some cases.

hth,
Beverly Howard [MS MVP-Mobile Devices]
Related resources
Anonymous
a b } Memory
November 23, 2004 5:26:33 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

Ok, my next question in selecting is this: what are the brands I should be
looking at? I hear that sandisk is not that good. I need middle to high end
in terms of capabilities and price. I am not sure which brands to compare or
even what brands exists. I find it hard to find the read and write speeds
for cards. Can anyone point me in a brand direction? Thanks.

Andrew
"Andrew Smith" <jim@ascnetsolutions.com> wrote in message
news:o HNTyaJ0EHA.3820@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
>I have read quite a few posts on comparisons between mmc, sd, and cf memory
>cards. From these I have been given a slightly mixed view as some posts
>contradict others. These are the conclusions I have made and I want to know
>if I am either missing something or if I am incorrect in my assumptions.
>
> CF - faster than sd or mmc, less power consumption, cheaper. However they
> are primarily used for expansions, although recently that has changed.
> Despite this, the expansions that are cf are still cheaper than the sd
> counterparts.
>
> SD - slower than cf. Uses a secure method for unauthorized copying of data
> and much smaller. However, much more expensive than cf cards. There are
> now expansion packs that use sd, although they are more expensive than the
> cf ones.
>
> MMC - I know little of these except sd and mmc are related with one being
> a type of the other.
>
> I have a Dell Axim x50v which supports sd and cf cards. I want to buy a
> large card, probably 1 GB, and a 802.11b wireless adapter. I assume the
> best thing to do is to buy a cf memory card and a sdio wireless lan
> adapter. Are the sdio wireless lan adapters slower than their cf
> counterparts much like sd memory cards are slower than their cf
> counterparts? What is the difference in speed and price in general?
> Really, what are the overall pros, cons, write speeds, read speeds, access
> speeds (for wireless adapters), and price differences between sd, cf, and
> mmc memory cards/wireless adapters and/or other expansions? I know that is
> a huge question, but can anyone fill me in? Thanks.
>
> Andrew
>
Anonymous
a b } Memory
November 23, 2004 5:26:34 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

I have noticed that "30x" or "60x" etc. is showing up on the packages of
media cards, indicating their speeds.
I don't think brand matters that much. I have only used SanDisk so far and
have never had any problems.
I think that speed will only be a factor if you intend to watch movies from
files located on your media cards. Faster media means more frames a second
and/or a better quality image.
I have noticed a big difference when playing video located in my main memory
on my device compared to from a SD card. I can get around 750 kbps bit rate
speeds on my devices main memory and still maintain good quality video. My
device is a Toshiba e800.
I don't have any higher speed SD cards to test how well they can handle
video.

I can read about 383 MB in one minute using a media reader/writer, and write
to my card the same amount of data in 3 minutes.

Other than watching video or frequently copying large files, I don't think
it would make much difference how fast the media card is.

"Andrew Smith" <jim@ascnetsolutions.com> wrote in message
news:uyC8D3S0EHA.1392@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> Ok, my next question in selecting is this: what are the brands I should be
> looking at? I hear that sandisk is not that good. I need middle to high
> end in terms of capabilities and price. I am not sure which brands to
> compare or even what brands exists. I find it hard to find the read and
> write speeds for cards. Can anyone point me in a brand direction? Thanks.
>
> Andrew
Anonymous
a b } Memory
November 23, 2004 1:09:03 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

"Gary Mount" <gary_mount@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:uYquQ7T0EHA.1300@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> I have noticed that "30x" or "60x" etc. is showing up on the packages of
> media cards, indicating their speeds.

Speed is a bit of a red herring here- what data rates can your machine
handle? I bet it's nowhere near 30X never mind 60X. Where this difference
can help is in digital photography where your pics are saved more quickly
meaning you get faster pics in a sequence.

> I don't think brand matters that much. I have only used SanDisk so far and
> have never had any problems.

Branding can make a difference. I've had one brand that would not work in my
machine but did work in other machines. There have been postings about this
in this newsgroup and in other ones.



> I think that speed will only be a factor if you intend to watch movies
from
> files located on your media cards. Faster media means more frames a second
> and/or a better quality image.

It makes a difference in lots of things loading large programs, large files
etc. I'm less sure about movies- it can only handle the data at a fixed
rate - it plays your video at a fixed rate- so any faster over that rate
won't make a lot of difference if it is read as used once over a certain
level unless the whole file gets read into memory as in the case of all
other large files/programs etc. - then the file type doesn't matter.

> I have noticed a big difference when playing video located in my main
memory
> on my device compared to from a SD card. I can get around 750 kbps bit
rate

Standard rate is 150 kbps. 750 is 5x speed, not your previously mentioned
30X, never mind 60X

> speeds on my devices main memory and still maintain good quality video. My
> device is a Toshiba e800.
> I don't have any higher speed SD cards to test how well they can handle
> video.
>
> I can read about 383 MB in one minute using a media reader/writer, and
write
> to my card the same amount of data in 3 minutes.
>
> Other than watching video or frequently copying large files, I don't think
> it would make much difference how fast the media card is.
>

Although that seems to be the sensible approach most people still want the
fastest even though there may not really be too much (if any) difference in
the real world.


> "Andrew Smith" <jim@ascnetsolutions.com> wrote in message
> news:uyC8D3S0EHA.1392@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> > Ok, my next question in selecting is this: what are the brands I should
be
> > looking at? I hear that sandisk is not that good. I need middle to high
> > end in terms of capabilities and price. I am not sure which brands to
> > compare or even what brands exists. I find it hard to find the read and
> > write speeds for cards. Can anyone point me in a brand direction?
Thanks.
> >
> > Andrew
>
>
Anonymous
a b } Memory
November 23, 2004 7:44:54 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

You have a good smattering of responses to the flash card type question. I
have one for you. Why do you want to buy an 802.11b adapter of any sort? the
X50v has WiFi (802.11b) built in. (as well as BlueTooth)

--
Sven, MS-MVP Mobile Devices
"Andrew Smith" <jim@ascnetsolutions.com> wrote in message
news:o HNTyaJ0EHA.3820@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
> I have a Dell Axim x50v which supports sd and cf cards. I want to buy a
> large card, probably 1 GB, and a 802.11b wireless adapter. I assume the
best
> thing to do is to buy a cf memory card and a sdio wireless lan adapter.
Anonymous
a b } Memory
November 23, 2004 10:26:58 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

It is only now that I realize how to work it. Originally I had a h5450 which
also had 802.11b and bluetooth. However, I could not connect to my home
802.11b wireless network. I found out how only after I have sold it and now
the new Dell Axim x50v will arrive in the mail shortly. I will play with it
when I get it to see if I can connect.


"Andrew Smith" <jim@ascnetsolutions.com> wrote in message
news:o HNTyaJ0EHA.3820@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
>I have read quite a few posts on comparisons between mmc, sd, and cf memory
>cards. From these I have been given a slightly mixed view as some posts
>contradict others. These are the conclusions I have made and I want to know
>if I am either missing something or if I am incorrect in my assumptions.
>
> CF - faster than sd or mmc, less power consumption, cheaper. However they
> are primarily used for expansions, although recently that has changed.
> Despite this, the expansions that are cf are still cheaper than the sd
> counterparts.
>
> SD - slower than cf. Uses a secure method for unauthorized copying of data
> and much smaller. However, much more expensive than cf cards. There are
> now expansion packs that use sd, although they are more expensive than the
> cf ones.
>
> MMC - I know little of these except sd and mmc are related with one being
> a type of the other.
>
> I have a Dell Axim x50v which supports sd and cf cards. I want to buy a
> large card, probably 1 GB, and a 802.11b wireless adapter. I assume the
> best thing to do is to buy a cf memory card and a sdio wireless lan
> adapter. Are the sdio wireless lan adapters slower than their cf
> counterparts much like sd memory cards are slower than their cf
> counterparts? What is the difference in speed and price in general?
> Really, what are the overall pros, cons, write speeds, read speeds, access
> speeds (for wireless adapters), and price differences between sd, cf, and
> mmc memory cards/wireless adapters and/or other expansions? I know that is
> a huge question, but can anyone fill me in? Thanks.
>
> Andrew
>
!