Voice over IP Tutorial, Whitepapers, News and Resource Gui..

Archived from groups: comp.dcom.sys.cisco,comp.dcom.voice-over-ip (More info?)

Hi All,

We just put up a new VoIP Resource site. (VoIP -- H.323, SIP, RTP,
Cisco AVVID Architecture)


http://www.voip-start.com


#Tutorials, News (updated daily), Whitepapers and Industry Links.
#Feel free to stop by and learn Voice over IP.
#VoIP resources for professionals and VoIP Newbies.


http://www.voip-start.com
3 answers Last reply
More about voice tutorial whitepapers news resource
  1. Archived from groups: comp.dcom.sys.cisco,comp.dcom.voice-over-ip (More info?)

    twestgate wrote:

    > Hi All,
    >
    > We just put up a new VoIP Resource site. (VoIP -- H.323, SIP, RTP,
    > Cisco AVVID Architecture)
    >
    > http://www.voip-start.com

    Great! could you clarify,
    "Recently, voice over ip (voip) toll-bypass has been prevented by ISP’s
    that block out voice over ip ports that are being used to carry voice
    over ip calls thru their network. Vonage has sued the local ISPs have
    won." - http://www.voip-start.com/voice-over-ip/voip-toll-bypass.htm

    Does that mean ISP's are allowed to block VoIP calls? Is that by port
    blocking or some other means?
  2. Archived from groups: comp.dcom.sys.cisco,comp.dcom.voice-over-ip (More info?)

    In article <w6-dncFn8OtNvsjfRVn-rA@comcast.com>,
    rick0.merrill@gmailNO.SPAMcom says...
    > twestgate wrote:
    >
    > > Hi All,
    > >
    > > We just put up a new VoIP Resource site. (VoIP -- H.323, SIP, RTP,
    > > Cisco AVVID Architecture)
    > >
    > > http://www.voip-start.com
    >
    > Great! could you clarify,
    > "Recently, voice over ip (voip) toll-bypass has been prevented by ISP’s
    > that block out voice over ip ports that are being used to carry voice
    > over ip calls thru their network. Vonage has sued the local ISPs have
    > won." - http://www.voip-start.com/voice-over-ip/voip-toll-bypass.htm
    >
    > Does that mean ISP's are allowed to block VoIP calls? Is that by port
    > blocking or some other means?

    In the U.S., the answer would be no. One ISP that did do this was
    "fined" $15,000 by the FCC.

    Generally speaking, it is an ISP's interest NOT to block calls, the
    rationale being that the more utility (value) the customer finds in the
    IP conectivity being provided, the more they are willing to pay. BUT...
    When when the ISP is also in the business of delivering traditional
    telephone service, you see this kind of thing attempted in order to
    preserve what are often monopoly positions on that service. In many
    cases, the measures taken are far more serious that merely blocking
    ports. For example, recent reports have stated that Mexican authorities
    have arrested two Vonage employees for transporting telephone traffic
    out of Mexico without the proper "concession" (failing to grease the
    right palms). The U.A.E. also plays serious hard-ball with those who try
    to circumvent their monopoly, jailing would be competitors.
  3. Archived from groups: comp.dcom.sys.cisco,comp.dcom.voice-over-ip (More info?)

    On Thu, 07 Apr 2005 13:53:19 -0700, John Nelson wrote:

    > In article <w6-dncFn8OtNvsjfRVn-rA@comcast.com>,
    > rick0.merrill@gmailNO.SPAMcom says...
    >> twestgate wrote:
    >>
    >> > Hi All,
    >> >
    >> > We just put up a new VoIP Resource site. (VoIP -- H.323, SIP, RTP,
    >> > Cisco AVVID Architecture)
    >> >
    >> > http://www.voip-start.com
    >>
    >> Great! could you clarify,
    >> "Recently, voice over ip (voip) toll-bypass has been prevented by ISP’s
    >> that block out voice over ip ports that are being used to carry voice
    >> over ip calls thru their network. Vonage has sued the local ISPs have
    >> won." - http://www.voip-start.com/voice-over-ip/voip-toll-bypass.htm
    >>
    >> Does that mean ISP's are allowed to block VoIP calls? Is that by port
    >> blocking or some other means?
    >
    > In the U.S., the answer would be no. One ISP that did do this was
    > "fined" $15,000 by the FCC.
    >
    > Generally speaking, it is an ISP's interest NOT to block calls,


    <snip>

    .... just wait, and see what AOL will do to Skype, Asterisk, and everything
    else that won't match their new service, once attempting to run over their
    network:

    http://www.geekzone.co.nz/content.asp?contentid=4337
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