Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Frames per second 101 - what do I need ???

Tags:
  • Graphics Cards
  • Games
  • FPS
  • Graphics
Last response: in Graphics & Displays
Share
June 22, 2006 10:48:15 PM

Hi guys,

I'm interested to understand the benchmarking of FPS. If I look at the THG VGA charts, it's pretty self explanatory (the higher the better).

My question is: How do I know what the minimum FPS requirement is for a game? Is it just a general number (ie. a FPS number above 30 means the game doesn’t get lagged), or is it game specific (you need a minimum of 20 FPS for the Sims 2, and 50 FPS for B&W to work without a hitch).

Could I then use the VGA charts to select a card based on the games I like to play. Where do you find out what the average FPS requirement for any given game?

Thanks! Sorry if these questions appear stupid. Newbie.

:oops: 

More about : frames 101

June 22, 2006 11:19:46 PM

It's very subjective. What one person finds acceptable the next finds unplayable. Generally speaking, for fps, the higher the better. Course, that holds true for all games, but especially for fps. Now, how much for you is really what you find acceptable.

For me personally, if I can maintain 45 then I'm OK. 60 would be better, but less than 45 and I can tell a big difference. You might be OK with that, or you might find 45 unplayable and need 75 or more. There is no right answer.

Oh, and there is also a difference between average and minimum. An average of 45 means there are some values less than 45. When I said maintain 45, I meant maintain 45, not average 45.
June 22, 2006 11:26:19 PM

Also it depends on the kind of game. A FPS (First Person Shooter) like Far Cry, HL2, FEAR, Quake4 etc. will require much higher fps to run smoothly: I would say 45fps minimum but as Pain already said it is subjective. However for games like B&W2, AoE3, The Sims2 etc. where raw speed is not that important the minimum fps is lower, around 30fps I'd say.
Related resources
June 22, 2006 11:29:13 PM

Oh ok great. Thanks for info. If I look at Black and White played on max resolution and max settings, it only has a FPS average of around 30 something FPS (best Radeon card). That appears to be pretty lousy if what you are saying is true (and that's the latest XTX). That means there is no HW out there to support B&W at it's maximum settings (that runs smoothly).

Another important question - do screens have a fixed resolution? If you buy a card with a sizeable resolution (Radeon XTX) and your screen is a 17inch older screen (smaller resolution), do you loose the benefit of the card?

THANKS! :lol: 

FishBoi
June 23, 2006 12:44:20 AM

Well, tons of people absolutely LOVE Halo and it runs at 30 fps MAX in order to keep the framerate smooth..



LCD screens have a maximum resolution based on the number of individual pixels the screen is made of, so if you screen is 17" I'd say your native res is probably 1280x1024 and that is plently high enough for your video card. You can't go any higher, but you can go lower, and it will look bad I assure you. Just stick with the native res and turn on some anti-aliasing (2x or 4x depending on the game) and you should be fine. Your games will look excellent.

If you use a CRT, however, then you can probably go all the way to 1600x1200 but in most cases you won't want to, to keep the image sharp. CRT monitors pixels aren't as clear, since the image isn't made of individual colored lights but a projected beam of electrons.

In either case, a gamer really should have no lower than a 17" screen. 17" is perfect in terms of cost and usefulness. However, for someone that feels graphics are very important to their gaming experience, you should go with a 19", because any size higher starts to get unreasonably expensive.

I personally only have a CRT with a 16" viewable screen area right now. I run my games at 1280x960 with 4x anti-aliasing, with the exception of World of Warcraft, which I run at 1600x1200 4x AA since my card can handle it fine and the game greatly benfits from the extra screen real estate. I don't know where my screen came from (it has a Sun logo on the front but windows thinks its a Dell), but the pixels at high res are unusually sharp. Since my viewing area is only 16", I still don't usually run at super high res because the pixels get so tiny that my eyes freak out trying to see them. One time I tried running in some custom resolutions and I found out my upper limit is 4000x1400 8O It's awesome, but the aspect ratio is crap, and the pixels get so small you really can't see them individually anymore, even if you squint.
June 24, 2006 2:38:11 AM

the FPS all depends on the person, its good to have a pc that will run lets say 75 FPS, because the crt monitor runs at 75hz, technicaly the human eye wont notice anything about 70 frames i believe, and u can play a game under 30 fps (i play BF2 at about 35) and maybe it wont bother you, its a very subjective question
June 24, 2006 11:01:23 PM

Quote:
technicaly the human eye wont notice anything about 70 frames i believe,


Technically, that is wrong, as the actual number is unknown and depends entirely of course in how it is defined. Generally speaking, the higher the better. :wink:
June 25, 2006 12:01:42 AM

the correct answer, for an image to not look jerky, the fps is 30 (basically 26-30). This is for all games as long as that is the lowest speed. Any slower, it will start to skip frames. For online games, like first person shooter games, 60fps or better would be the best speed. 60fps online game gives you the advantage of better kills than someone running at 30fps. Faster it runs, the more accurate the kills are online. Generally, most games can report 30fps or 60fps back to the server, like Enemy Territory for example.
June 25, 2006 1:25:20 AM

Quote:
the correct answer, for an image to not look jerky, the fps is 30 (basically 26-30). This is for all games as long as that is the lowest speed. Any slower, it will start to skip frames. For online games, like first person shooter games, 60fps or better would be the best speed. 60fps online game gives you the advantage of better kills than someone running at 30fps. Faster it runs, the more accurate the kills are online. Generally, most games can report 30fps or 60fps back to the server, like Enemy Territory for example.


One blind study I saw showed that over 95% reliably identify artifacts below about 30fps. A few can detect frame rates below 60 and a select few can detect 75 - I can't remember the fraction on the 75fps group, something like one in three hundred.
June 29, 2006 10:43:28 PM

This is very interesting. I liked "computertech82"'s answer. I actually gave it a go on my old laptop (Dell, 2 years old), and it ran at 30fps as a standard in all games. The minute the game got busy (like when the allies attacked me in C&C), the FPS rate dropped to below 10, and then it jammed and skipped frames. I HATE THAT!

What do you think a good idling speed for an average game is? If it does get busy, it shouldn't drop below 30fps, or otherwise it starts to skip.

Another way of putting it - how many FPS does a sudden huge battle in Black and White with high detail suck up. Is the # 30. That then means I need a idle FPS number around 60, and I should be set.

FOOD FOR THOUGHT!

FishBoi
June 29, 2006 11:53:02 PM

Quote:
What do you think a good idling speed for an average game is?


You need to specify what is idling. For example, I've seen many apps idle in the 100-200FPS range, others around 70. That's on my box that has XFired 1900s. My video box has an 1800XT and the same apps will typically run 20 to 40FPS lower at idle, maybe more.
June 30, 2006 9:51:34 AM

From my own experimentation:

You need higher frame rates for FPS and TPS, Other games which does not have rapidly changing screens can run lower. Best to get over 30fps, and if you are getting low frame rates, use vetical sync (this may sound counter productive, and it is) but the reason is because LOW and UNSTEADY framerates can cause dizziness and nausea in some people and have even more problems with epileptic problems.

Run at lower res rather than low framerates. IF your monitor can handle it, increase your referesh rate, e.g. 85Hz
!