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Water blocks with passive heat cooling fins????

Tags:
  • Heatsinks
  • Water Cooling
  • Heat
  • Cooling
  • Overclocking
  • Product
Last response: in Overclocking
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June 24, 2006 2:59:29 PM

Why hasnt anybody made a water block that also has copper fins for better heat disipation....

Imagine a swiftec water block with small copper spikes cuming out of it for better heat disipation!!!!

Best of both worlds water cooling + additional passive heat sink!

More about : water blocks passive heat cooling fins

June 24, 2006 3:53:55 PM

It's probably because liquid cooling is usually around 10 times as efficient as air cooling. Forced liquid convection is probably at least 100 times as efficient and effective as quiescent air cooling on fins. You'd have to a fan to make the fins effective at all, and what's the point of having a noisy water cooled machine.
Besides, most of the water-cooled rigs I've seen stay just a few degrees above room temp, not enough to worry about. You're not getting better than that without so sort of refrigeration. :D 
June 24, 2006 4:48:24 PM

I think he meant w/out any fan, just passively cooled for another 1 or 2 degrees.
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June 24, 2006 5:52:06 PM

That's just it. Fins wouldn't make even another degree of difference, unless your block is a really high temperature. Most water cooling blocks aren't hot, they're pretty close to room temp already. You need a big temperature gradient to transfer any noticeable amount heat without forced convection.
June 24, 2006 6:47:24 PM

Quote:
Why hasnt anybody made a water block that also has copper fins for better heat disipation....

Imagine a swiftec water block with small copper spikes cuming out of it for better heat disipation!!!!

Best of both worlds water cooling + additional passive heat sink!


Check out the Reserator.

Edit:
There are no waterblocks like what you wanted. It would be pointless because the surface area increase would be minimal at best, and would cause no difference in heat dissapation. Just higher cost due to more material usage.
June 25, 2006 9:57:54 AM

Quote:
Why hasnt anybody made a water block that also has copper fins for better heat disipation....

Imagine a swiftec water block with small copper spikes cuming out of it for better heat disipation!!!!

Best of both worlds water cooling + additional passive heat sink!
Thermaltake has a waterblock/HS that does that. It isn't as efficient as you would think it would be though.It uses a fan though, so it isn't passive.

http://www.thermaltakeusa.com/product/Liquid/Upgrade/cl...
June 25, 2006 12:23:37 PM

It is a nonsense: if the water in the circuit is below ambient temperature (and normally it would be, since the air inside the case is warmer than the air outside that cools the water) doing such a thing would reduce the cooling efficiency instead of raising it up.
June 25, 2006 1:51:18 PM

Quote:
Why hasnt anybody made a water block that also has copper fins for better heat disipation....

Imagine a swiftec water block with small copper spikes cuming out of it for better heat disipation!!!!

Best of both worlds water cooling + additional passive heat sink!
Thermaltake has a waterblock/HS that does that. It isn't as efficient as you would think it would be though.It uses a fan though, so it isn't passive.

http://www.thermaltakeusa.com/product/Liquid/Upgrade/cl...



Using this water - block and comparing it with other regual water block. I wonder it if would produce cooler temps on the cpu while using the same components. It's a pretty cool design combining hsf and water block.
June 25, 2006 5:56:02 PM

its a piece of shit -_-

the idea of putting fins on a waterblock is stupid because there isn't enough surface area where the water and the fins are touching, so there is barely any thermal transfer
June 25, 2006 6:10:47 PM

So there is no difference between this fin water block and normal one, I see.

I can't find any reviews on this Tt heatsinkfan waterblock comparing with just a normal water block.
June 25, 2006 6:15:00 PM

Quote:
That's just it. Fins wouldn't make even another degree of difference, unless your block is a really high temperature. Most water cooling blocks aren't hot, they're pretty close to room temp already. You need a big temperature gradient to transfer any noticeable amount heat without forced convection.


Exactly. If the additional fin surface area was added to the water radiator, you might get some advantage for systems limited by an undersized radiator. To the OP: just remember the design of water cooled systems involve using the water block and hoses to move the heat to another location (the radiator) that is set up to be efficient at exchanging heat.
June 25, 2006 11:33:43 PM

Quote:




Using this water - block and comparing it with other regual water block. I wonder it if would produce cooler temps on the cpu while using the same components. It's a pretty cool design combining hsf and water block.


Is that not just a radiator integrated on the cpu water block? I would think that that would be able to at least stabilize the temperatures a bit more effectively. As far as making it any cooler? Probably not much more than you would get with a normal radiator. However, if you used that in tandem with a normal radiator, it may do some to reduce temps closer to ambient, especially with an extreme overclock.
June 27, 2006 3:25:42 AM

the improvement wouldn't be visible and the production cost for such a thing would be too high. the waterblock will be more efficient if it just did its job - removing heat from the cpu to the water
!