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BACKUP WONT

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Anonymous
September 27, 2004 6:01:04 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

i have permissions as an administrator...
1. The Backup or Restore Wizard starts.
2. Click Advanced Mode.
3. Click the Backup tab.
4. On the Job menu, click New.
5. cclick to select the check boxes
6. Click to select the System State check box.
7. In the Backup destination list, click the backup destination
D:\
BACK04

==> PATH D:\BACK04 "is invalid" but there is a writable CD in the
D: drive. WHat gives?!

More about : backup wont

Anonymous
September 27, 2004 6:01:05 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

You cannot use NTBackup to backup direct to a CD. Create the file on the
'normal' hard drive and then burn that file to your CD.
--
Cari (MS-MVP Printing, Imaging & Hardware)
www.coribright.com

"Rick Merrill" <RickMerrill@comTHROW.net> wrote in message
news:eYorzvLpEHA.4004@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
>i have permissions as an administrator...
> 1. The Backup or Restore Wizard starts.
> 2. Click Advanced Mode.
> 3. Click the Backup tab.
> 4. On the Job menu, click New.
> 5. cclick to select the check boxes
> 6. Click to select the System State check box.
> 7. In the Backup destination list, click the backup destination
> D:\
> BACK04
>
> ==> PATH D:\BACK04 "is invalid" but there is a writable CD in the
> D: drive. WHat gives?!
>
>
Anonymous
September 27, 2004 6:41:45 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Cari (MS-MVP) wrote:
> You cannot use NTBackup to backup direct to a CD. Create the file on the
> 'normal' hard drive and then burn that file to your CD.

Actually, I found that by creating a folder on the CDR, the backup would
then proceed. BUT you are right, it stuck on "too big a file" for 1 CD!


Back in '02 I did a spanning backup, just can't remember how!!!! - RM
Related resources
Anonymous
September 27, 2004 6:41:46 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

On Mon, 27 Sep 2004 14:41:45 -0400, Rick Merrill wrote:

> Cari (MS-MVP) wrote:
>> You cannot use NTBackup to backup direct to a CD. Create the file on the
>> 'normal' hard drive and then burn that file to your CD.
>
> Actually, I found that by creating a folder on the CDR, the backup would
> then proceed. BUT you are right, it stuck on "too big a file" for 1 CD!
>
>
> Back in '02 I did a spanning backup, just can't remember how!!!! - RM

"How" is done with a program capable of spanning multiple disks - neither
ntbackup or XP's CD burning are that program. If you save to the hard drive
and then burn the resulting file to CD, most third party burning programs
support disk spanning. If you have one of these third party programs
installed, check the help file to be sure it is supported and to read an
overview of how it works.

--
Sharon F
MS-MVP ~ Windows XP Shell/User
Anonymous
September 27, 2004 6:41:46 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

On Mon, 27 Sep 2004 14:41:45 -0400, Rick Merrill wrote:

> Cari (MS-MVP) wrote:
>> You cannot use NTBackup to backup direct to a CD. Create the file on the
>> 'normal' hard drive and then burn that file to your CD.
>
> Actually, I found that by creating a folder on the CDR, the backup would
> then proceed. BUT you are right, it stuck on "too big a file" for 1 CD!
>
>
> Back in '02 I did a spanning backup, just can't remember how!!!! - RM

PS: Most third party backup programs also support disk spanning.

--
Sharon F
MS-MVP ~ Windows XP Shell/User
Anonymous
September 27, 2004 7:32:55 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Sharon F wrote:
> On Mon, 27 Sep 2004 14:41:45 -0400, Rick Merrill wrote:
>
>
>>Cari (MS-MVP) wrote:
>>
>>>You cannot use NTBackup to backup direct to a CD. Create the file on the
>>>'normal' hard drive and then burn that file to your CD.
>>
>>Actually, I found that by creating a folder on the CDR, the backup would
>>then proceed. BUT you are right, it stuck on "too big a file" for 1 CD!
>>
>>
>>Back in '02 I did a spanning backup, just can't remember how!!!! - RM
>
>
> "How" is done with a program capable of spanning multiple disks - neither
> ntbackup or XP's CD burning are that program.

Thanks for making that clear. Sounds like M$ missed the mark on backup!
What the heck good is backup on a laptop then?

> If you save to the hard drive
> and then burn the resulting file to CD,

Then one must have less than half the disk drive in use! Pretty screwy!

> most third party burning programs
> support disk spanning.

At least M$ left some market that.

> If you have one of these third party programs
> installed, check the help file to be sure it is supported and to read an
> overview of how it works.

Ok.
Anonymous
September 29, 2004 4:00:08 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Sharon F wrote:

> On Mon, 27 Sep 2004 14:41:45 -0400, Rick Merrill wrote:
>
>
>>Cari (MS-MVP) wrote:
>>
>>>You cannot use NTBackup to backup direct to a CD. Create the file on the
>>>'normal' hard drive and then burn that file to your CD.
>>
>>Actually, I found that by creating a folder on the CDR, the backup would
>>then proceed. BUT you are right, it stuck on "too big a file" for 1 CD!
>>
>>
>>Back in '02 I did a spanning backup, just can't remember how!!!! - RM
>
>
> PS: Most third party backup programs also support disk spanning.
>

When I look at my "backup" CDs nothing shows. Is that 'normal' with
3rd party backup s/w (and I can't figure out which one it was)?
Anonymous
September 29, 2004 7:21:37 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

<Thanks for making that clear. Sounds like M$ missed the mark on backup!
What the heck good is backup on a laptop then?>

It's not their backup application. Microsoft has no backup app of its own.
The backup application included with XP is a lite version of Backup MyPC
distributed by Stomp Software and created by Veritas,
http://www.stompinc.com/index.phtml?stp

<Then one must have less than half the disk drive in use! Pretty screwy!>

Not necessarily. You really only need to back up your data, you should
have disks for your applications and operating system. Also, given the
price of hard drives today and the availability of external drives, even for
laptops, a user could easily come up with the necessary space.

<At least M$ left some market that.>

And that's the reason why the backup applet is not as full featured as you'd
like.

All that said, I'm not being an apologist. The third line in my signature
is proof enough of my feelings on the importance of a good backup. From the
days of Windows 3.1 and DOS, there's been a backup application included with
the operating system, albeit, third party but usually as full featured as
necessary. Given the mass market to which computers are now sold, it is
appalling to me that every computer is NOT sold with a full featured backup
application that could handle most needs of the common user including
backing up directly to CD and now DVD and disk spanning if necessary. And
it doesn't necessarily have to be included with the OS. PC manufacturer's
include all sorts of software bundles with their systems yet they often
leave out the single most important application they could supply the user,
a good backup application.


--
Michael Solomon MS-MVP
Windows Shell/User
Backup is a PC User's Best Friend
DTS-L.Org: http://www.dts-l.org/

"Rick Merrill" <RickMerrill@comTHROW.net> wrote in message
news:o pzCJjMpEHA.556@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> Sharon F wrote:
>> On Mon, 27 Sep 2004 14:41:45 -0400, Rick Merrill wrote:
>>
>>
>>>Cari (MS-MVP) wrote:
>>>
>>>>You cannot use NTBackup to backup direct to a CD. Create the file on
>>>>the 'normal' hard drive and then burn that file to your CD.
>>>
>>>Actually, I found that by creating a folder on the CDR, the backup would
>>>then proceed. BUT you are right, it stuck on "too big a file" for 1 CD!
>>>
>>>
>>>Back in '02 I did a spanning backup, just can't remember how!!!! - RM
>>
>>
>> "How" is done with a program capable of spanning multiple disks - neither
>> ntbackup or XP's CD burning are that program.
>
> Thanks for making that clear. Sounds like M$ missed the mark on backup!
> What the heck good is backup on a laptop then?
>
>> If you save to the hard drive
>> and then burn the resulting file to CD,
>
> Then one must have less than half the disk drive in use! Pretty screwy!
>
>> most third party burning programs
>> support disk spanning.
>
> At least M$ left some market that.
>
>> If you have one of these third party programs
>> installed, check the help file to be sure it is supported and to read an
>> overview of how it works.
>
> Ok.
>
>
Anonymous
September 30, 2004 12:07:56 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

On Wed, 29 Sep 2004 12:00:08 -0400, Rick Merrill wrote:

> When I look at my "backup" CDs nothing shows. Is that 'normal' with
> 3rd party backup s/w (and I can't figure out which one it was)?

I was going to say it depends on the program but regardless of what format
the backup program uses for creating the backup set, you should see
something on the CD. Some of the backup programs do have their own
"Explorer" type of program that let you go into the backup and grab one or
two files. But you should still be able to see the main backup using
Windows Explorer.

This sounds more like some sort of burning problem. Figure out what burning
program you're using. Also try to determine if you're writing sessions or
using packet writing. You'll need to work from there to find the "missing"
backup files that were burned to disk.

Incidentally, if using the XP burning features, this is a two step process:
"Send to CD" and then go to the icon for the burner in Explorer. If you
have the common tasks pane displayed, there should be a "burn to CD" task
that tells XP to burn the files waiting in the "staging area" to the CDR or
CDRW. More about XP's burn features here:
http://www.aumha.org/win5/a/xpcd.htm

Session writing can be done on CDR and CDRW. Also a program may support
multisession writing but to read all contents the drive must be capable of
reading multisession disks. If the drive is not capable of doing so, you'll
only see the last session. Some drives can read "finished" or "closed"
disks only.

In some cases, a backup program provides its own burning functions. If
using one of these, I have no idea what's wrong. Best place to check would
be with tech support for the program.

Packet writing is available on CDRWs only. This style allows you to
drag/drop files to a CD much like you would to a floppy disk. Programs such
as InCD and Roxio's Drag-To-Disk use packet writing.

--
Sharon F
MS-MVP ~ Windows XP Shell/User
!