scuff marks from exit rollers - Epson 2200

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

The exit rollers cause scuff marks on Epson Premium Glossy Photo Paper on an
Epson 2200 printer. They are parallel lines, most visible on a uniform
color. It may be the increased fragiligy of the MediaStreet ink (but they
claim Epson has acknowledged that problem for their inks, too). They supply
"exit flags" to hold up the top exit rollers. This eliminates the scuffing,
but then the paper comes out crooked at the end, and small sheets (45x6)
simply stop feeding. I've tried changing the paper thickness (regular or
envelopes).

Is there a solution, such as a way to keep the paper going and going
straight without exit rollers?

Is it a MediaStreet problem, or do Epson inks also behave this way?

--
- Alan Justice
41 answers Last reply
More about scuff marks exit rollers epson 2200
  1. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Sounds like the famous Epson "pizza cutter" wheels. Open the lid and look
    in the feed area where the paper comes out after printing and you will see
    serrated wheels on top of the print. They are known to cause faint marks in
    dark uniform areas. I have been told that these wheels are absolutely
    unnecessary, but I wouldn't swear to it! I believe you can find a fix for
    it on the MIS ink website. It involves removing the bar that carries these
    wheel guides, putting a thin washer under the bar at each screw area to hold
    it up a bit higher, and replacing the bar. I had the same problem in my
    Epson Stylus 900. Before I thought to do this fix I decided to move on to
    the Canon i960 for better prints and good, cheap non-OEM inks. Your 2200 is
    newer technology and a much better printer than my ES 900 was, and I am not
    suggesting a change. If you don't find the answer on the MIS site you might
    also google the problem (might find it under pizza wheels Epson printers or
    Epson printer guide wheels) and see what you come up with. I like the
    solution I mentioned as it will give you a little more clearance and will
    probably solve the problem.

    "Alan Justice" <spam@spamspamspam.spam> wrote in message
    news:o1d7e.5672$lP1.4011@newsread1.news.pas.earthlink.net...
    > The exit rollers cause scuff marks on Epson Premium Glossy Photo Paper on
    > an
    > Epson 2200 printer. They are parallel lines, most visible on a uniform
    > color. It may be the increased fragiligy of the MediaStreet ink (but they
    > claim Epson has acknowledged that problem for their inks, too). They
    > supply
    > "exit flags" to hold up the top exit rollers. This eliminates the
    > scuffing,
    > but then the paper comes out crooked at the end, and small sheets (45x6)
    > simply stop feeding. I've tried changing the paper thickness (regular or
    > envelopes).
    >
    > Is there a solution, such as a way to keep the paper going and going
    > straight without exit rollers?
    >
    > Is it a MediaStreet problem, or do Epson inks also behave this way?
    >
    > --
    > - Alan Justice
    >
    >
    >
  2. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    On Wed, 13 Apr 2005 17:54:28 GMT, in comp.periphs.printers "Alan
    Justice" <spam@spamspamspam.spam> wrote:

    >The exit rollers cause scuff marks on Epson Premium Glossy Photo Paper on an
    >Epson 2200 printer. They are parallel lines, most visible on a uniform
    >color. It may be the increased fragiligy of the MediaStreet ink (but they
    >claim Epson has acknowledged that problem for their inks, too). They supply
    >"exit flags" to hold up the top exit rollers. This eliminates the scuffing,
    >but then the paper comes out crooked at the end, and small sheets (45x6)
    >simply stop feeding. I've tried changing the paper thickness (regular or
    >envelopes).
    >
    >Is there a solution, such as a way to keep the paper going and going
    >straight without exit rollers?
    >
    >Is it a MediaStreet problem, or do Epson inks also behave this way?


    Try setting the paper thickness setting to thick?
  3. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    The "pizza wheels" come before the exit wheels, and are closer together.
    The scuffs are from the exit wheels (two apposing). I can inactivate some
    of them, but with all out, the paper doesn't feed right.

    --
    - Alan Justice

    "Burt" <sfbjgNOSPAM@pacbell.net> wrote in message
    news:o1j7e.1446$J12.49@newssvr14.news.prodigy.com...
    > Sounds like the famous Epson "pizza cutter" wheels. Open the lid and look
    > in the feed area where the paper comes out after printing and you will see
    > serrated wheels on top of the print. They are known to cause faint marks
    in
    > dark uniform areas. I have been told that these wheels are absolutely
    > unnecessary, but I wouldn't swear to it! I believe you can find a fix for
    > it on the MIS ink website. It involves removing the bar that carries
    these
    > wheel guides, putting a thin washer under the bar at each screw area to
    hold
    > it up a bit higher, and replacing the bar. I had the same problem in my
    > Epson Stylus 900. Before I thought to do this fix I decided to move on to
    > the Canon i960 for better prints and good, cheap non-OEM inks. Your 2200
    is
    > newer technology and a much better printer than my ES 900 was, and I am
    not
    > suggesting a change. If you don't find the answer on the MIS site you
    might
    > also google the problem (might find it under pizza wheels Epson printers
    or
    > Epson printer guide wheels) and see what you come up with. I like the
    > solution I mentioned as it will give you a little more clearance and will
    > probably solve the problem.
    >
    > "Alan Justice" <spam@spamspamspam.spam> wrote in message
    > news:o1d7e.5672$lP1.4011@newsread1.news.pas.earthlink.net...
    > > The exit rollers cause scuff marks on Epson Premium Glossy Photo Paper
    on
    > > an
    > > Epson 2200 printer. They are parallel lines, most visible on a uniform
    > > color. It may be the increased fragiligy of the MediaStreet ink (but
    they
    > > claim Epson has acknowledged that problem for their inks, too). They
    > > supply
    > > "exit flags" to hold up the top exit rollers. This eliminates the
    > > scuffing,
    > > but then the paper comes out crooked at the end, and small sheets (45x6)
    > > simply stop feeding. I've tried changing the paper thickness (regular
    or
    > > envelopes).
    > >
    > > Is there a solution, such as a way to keep the paper going and going
    > > straight without exit rollers?
    > >
    > > Is it a MediaStreet problem, or do Epson inks also behave this way?
    > >
    > > --
    > > - Alan Justice
    > >
    > >
    > >
    >
    >
  4. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Does this problem happen with the R series Epson Printers as well.

    Why do you hear about fewer problems with Canon printers on this NG?

    Ed Ruf wrote:

    >On Wed, 13 Apr 2005 17:54:28 GMT, in comp.periphs.printers "Alan
    >Justice" <spam@spamspamspam.spam> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >>The exit rollers cause scuff marks on Epson Premium Glossy Photo Paper on an
    >>Epson 2200 printer. They are parallel lines, most visible on a uniform
    >>color. It may be the increased fragiligy of the MediaStreet ink (but they
    >>claim Epson has acknowledged that problem for their inks, too). They supply
    >>"exit flags" to hold up the top exit rollers. This eliminates the scuffing,
    >>but then the paper comes out crooked at the end, and small sheets (45x6)
    >>simply stop feeding. I've tried changing the paper thickness (regular or
    >>envelopes).
    >>
    >>Is there a solution, such as a way to keep the paper going and going
    >>straight without exit rollers?
    >>
    >>Is it a MediaStreet problem, or do Epson inks also behave this way?
    >>
    >>
    >
    >
    >Try setting the paper thickness setting to thick?
    >
    >
  5. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    On Thu, 14 Apr 2005 18:58:13 GMT, in comp.periphs.printers measekite
    <measekite@yahoo.com> wrote:

    >Does this problem happen with the R series Epson Printers as well.
    >
    >Why do you hear about fewer problems with Canon printers on this NG?

    Sorry to burst your bubble. I've had no such problems with either my 1270
    or my 800.. No clogs, no pizza wheels, nothing.
    ----------
    Ed Ruf Lifetime AMA# 344007 (Usenet@EdwardG.Ruf.com)
    http://EdwardGRuf.com
  6. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    "measekite" <measekite@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:93z7e.3444$dT4.2823@newssvr13.news.prodigy.com...
    > Does this problem happen with the R series Epson Printers as well.
    > Why do you hear about fewer problems with Canon printers on this NG?
    >

    Probably because they are going to more sensible places to ask questions
    rather than being shot down in flames on here.

    If you were to take five minutes out of your life of making sarcastic
    comments and pushing Canon printers as being the best thing since sliced
    bread, you'll find there's more than enough people having problems with the
    pizza wheels on Canon, HP and other printers too

    e.g.

    http://www.stevesforums.com/forums/view_topic.php?id=35434&forum_id=56

    http://largeformatphotography.info/lfforum/topic/498976.html

    http://groups.google.co.uk/groups?hl=en&lr=&rls=GGLD,GGLD:2004-20,GGLD:en&threadm=ant182054bc8fBGj%40dinkla.demon.nl&rnum=33&prev=/groups%3Fq%3Dcanon%2Bpizza%2Bwheel%26start%3D30%26hl%3Den%26lr%3D%26rls%3DGGLD,GGLD:2004-20,GGLD:en%26selm%3Dant182054bc8fBGj%2540dinkla.demon.nl%26rnum%3D33
  7. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    At least part of the problem seems to be that I am using MediaStreet ink,
    which costs 20% as much as Epson (after a $300 investment in their
    cartridges etc). They know of the problem. But apparently, it can happen
    with Epson inks too.

    --
    - Alan Justice

    "measekite" <measekite@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:93z7e.3444$dT4.2823@newssvr13.news.prodigy.com...
    > Does this problem happen with the R series Epson Printers as well.
    >
    > Why do you hear about fewer problems with Canon printers on this NG?
    >
    > Ed Ruf wrote:
    >
    > >On Wed, 13 Apr 2005 17:54:28 GMT, in comp.periphs.printers "Alan
    > >Justice" <spam@spamspamspam.spam> wrote:
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >>The exit rollers cause scuff marks on Epson Premium Glossy Photo Paper
    on an
    > >>Epson 2200 printer. They are parallel lines, most visible on a uniform
    > >>color. It may be the increased fragiligy of the MediaStreet ink (but
    they
    > >>claim Epson has acknowledged that problem for their inks, too). They
    supply
    > >>"exit flags" to hold up the top exit rollers. This eliminates the
    scuffing,
    > >>but then the paper comes out crooked at the end, and small sheets (45x6)
    > >>simply stop feeding. I've tried changing the paper thickness (regular
    or
    > >>envelopes).
    > >>
    > >>Is there a solution, such as a way to keep the paper going and going
    > >>straight without exit rollers?
    > >>
    > >>Is it a MediaStreet problem, or do Epson inks also behave this way?
    > >>
    > >>
    > >
    > >
    > >Try setting the paper thickness setting to thick?
    > >
    > >
  8. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Ivor Floppy wrote:

    >"measekite" <measekite@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    >news:93z7e.3444$dT4.2823@newssvr13.news.prodigy.com...
    >
    >
    >>Does this problem happen with the R series Epson Printers as well.
    >>Why do you hear about fewer problems with Canon printers on this NG?
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >
    >Probably because they are going to more sensible places to ask questions
    >rather than being shot down in flames on here.
    >
    >If you were to take five minutes out of your life of making sarcastic
    >comments and pushing Canon printers as being the best thing since sliced
    >bread, you'll find there's more than enough people having problems with the
    >pizza wheels on Canon,
    >

    There are no pizzas with or without extra cheese on the Canon. Besides,
    I like slice bread. I never ate a printer with peanut butter and jelly.
    :-)

    >HP and other printers too
    >
    >e.g.
    >
    >http://www.stevesforums.com/forums/view_topic.php?id=35434&forum_id=56
    >
    >http://largeformatphotography.info/lfforum/topic/498976.html
    >
    >http://groups.google.co.uk/groups?hl=en&lr=&rls=GGLD,GGLD:2004-20,GGLD:en&threadm=ant182054bc8fBGj%40dinkla.demon.nl&rnum=33&prev=/groups%3Fq%3Dcanon%2Bpizza%2Bwheel%26start%3D30%26hl%3Den%26lr%3D%26rls%3DGGLD,GGLD:2004-20,GGLD:en%26selm%3Dant182054bc8fBGj%2540dinkla.demon.nl%26rnum%3D33
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
  9. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Alan Justice wrote:

    >At least part of the problem seems to be that I am using MediaStreet ink,
    >which costs 20% as much as Epson (after a $300 investment in their
    >cartridges etc). They know of the problem. But apparently, it can happen
    >with Epson inks too.
    >
    >

    What company makes the ink that is sold under the media street label?

    >--
    >- Alan Justice
    >
    >"measekite" <measekite@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    >news:93z7e.3444$dT4.2823@newssvr13.news.prodigy.com...
    >
    >
    >>Does this problem happen with the R series Epson Printers as well.
    >>
    >>Why do you hear about fewer problems with Canon printers on this NG?
    >>
    >>Ed Ruf wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>>On Wed, 13 Apr 2005 17:54:28 GMT, in comp.periphs.printers "Alan
    >>>Justice" <spam@spamspamspam.spam> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>The exit rollers cause scuff marks on Epson Premium Glossy Photo Paper
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >on an
    >
    >
    >>>>Epson 2200 printer. They are parallel lines, most visible on a uniform
    >>>>color. It may be the increased fragiligy of the MediaStreet ink (but
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >they
    >
    >
    >>>>claim Epson has acknowledged that problem for their inks, too). They
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >supply
    >
    >
    >>>>"exit flags" to hold up the top exit rollers. This eliminates the
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >scuffing,
    >
    >
    >>>>but then the paper comes out crooked at the end, and small sheets (45x6)
    >>>>simply stop feeding. I've tried changing the paper thickness (regular
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >or
    >
    >
    >>>>envelopes).
    >>>>
    >>>>Is there a solution, such as a way to keep the paper going and going
    >>>>straight without exit rollers?
    >>>>
    >>>>Is it a MediaStreet problem, or do Epson inks also behave this way?
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>Try setting the paper thickness setting to thick?
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >
    >
    >
    >
  10. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    The 2200's design didn't fully take into account the slower drying speed
    of Ultrachrome inks with some papers. As a result, the image can be
    damaged by the rollers as it leaves the printer.

    There are a number of devices available (home brew to commercial) that
    lift part of the roller mechanism to reduce the pressure on the print as
    it leaves the printer when these circumstances develop.

    Art

    Burt wrote:

    > Sounds like the famous Epson "pizza cutter" wheels. Open the lid and look
    > in the feed area where the paper comes out after printing and you will see
    > serrated wheels on top of the print. They are known to cause faint marks in
    > dark uniform areas. I have been told that these wheels are absolutely
    > unnecessary, but I wouldn't swear to it! I believe you can find a fix for
    > it on the MIS ink website. It involves removing the bar that carries these
    > wheel guides, putting a thin washer under the bar at each screw area to hold
    > it up a bit higher, and replacing the bar. I had the same problem in my
    > Epson Stylus 900. Before I thought to do this fix I decided to move on to
    > the Canon i960 for better prints and good, cheap non-OEM inks. Your 2200 is
    > newer technology and a much better printer than my ES 900 was, and I am not
    > suggesting a change. If you don't find the answer on the MIS site you might
    > also google the problem (might find it under pizza wheels Epson printers or
    > Epson printer guide wheels) and see what you come up with. I like the
    > solution I mentioned as it will give you a little more clearance and will
    > probably solve the problem.
    >
    > "Alan Justice" <spam@spamspamspam.spam> wrote in message
    > news:o1d7e.5672$lP1.4011@newsread1.news.pas.earthlink.net...
    >
    >>The exit rollers cause scuff marks on Epson Premium Glossy Photo Paper on
    >>an
    >>Epson 2200 printer. They are parallel lines, most visible on a uniform
    >>color. It may be the increased fragiligy of the MediaStreet ink (but they
    >>claim Epson has acknowledged that problem for their inks, too). They
    >>supply
    >>"exit flags" to hold up the top exit rollers. This eliminates the
    >>scuffing,
    >>but then the paper comes out crooked at the end, and small sheets (45x6)
    >>simply stop feeding. I've tried changing the paper thickness (regular or
    >>envelopes).
    >>
    >>Is there a solution, such as a way to keep the paper going and going
    >>straight without exit rollers?
    >>
    >>Is it a MediaStreet problem, or do Epson inks also behave this way?
    >>
    >>--
    >>- Alan Justice
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >
    >
    >
  11. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    This problem was the result of Epson introducing some new papers after
    the printer was produced, which dried more slowly with the Ultrachrome
    inks. To the best of my knowledge, they resolved it with the R800 and
    probably the R1800 printers.

    Color pigment inks are more difficult to make, to make paper for, and to
    keep from clogging, which is probably why Canon stays away from them.
    However, they have some advantages.

    Art

    measekite wrote:

    > Does this problem happen with the R series Epson Printers as well.
    > Why do you hear about fewer problems with Canon printers on this NG?
    >
    > Ed Ruf wrote:
    >
    >> On Wed, 13 Apr 2005 17:54:28 GMT, in comp.periphs.printers "Alan
    >> Justice" <spam@spamspamspam.spam> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>> The exit rollers cause scuff marks on Epson Premium Glossy Photo
    >>> Paper on an
    >>> Epson 2200 printer. They are parallel lines, most visible on a uniform
    >>> color. It may be the increased fragiligy of the MediaStreet ink (but
    >>> they
    >>> claim Epson has acknowledged that problem for their inks, too). They
    >>> supply
    >>> "exit flags" to hold up the top exit rollers. This eliminates the
    >>> scuffing,
    >>> but then the paper comes out crooked at the end, and small sheets (45x6)
    >>> simply stop feeding. I've tried changing the paper thickness
    >>> (regular or
    >>> envelopes).
    >>>
    >>> Is there a solution, such as a way to keep the paper going and going
    >>> straight without exit rollers?
    >>>
    >>> Is it a MediaStreet problem, or do Epson inks also behave this way?
    >>>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Try setting the paper thickness setting to thick?
    >>
    >>
  12. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Arthur Entlich wrote:

    > The 2200's design didn't fully take into account the slower drying
    > speed of Ultrachrome inks with some papers. As a result, the image can
    > be damaged by the rollers as it leaves the printer.
    >
    > There are a number of devices available (home brew to commercial) that
    > lift part of the roller mechanism to reduce the pressure on the print
    > as it leaves the printer when these circumstances develop.


    What I am saying is not to be a matter of fact but posed as a question.
    It appears that there are more design problems with Epson Printers,
    based on the things I read here, than HP or Canon.

    >
    > Art
    >
    > Burt wrote:
    >
    >> Sounds like the famous Epson "pizza cutter" wheels. Open the lid and
    >> look in the feed area where the paper comes out after printing and
    >> you will see serrated wheels on top of the print. They are known to
    >> cause faint marks in dark uniform areas. I have been told that these
    >> wheels are absolutely unnecessary, but I wouldn't swear to it! I
    >> believe you can find a fix for it on the MIS ink website. It
    >> involves removing the bar that carries these wheel guides, putting a
    >> thin washer under the bar at each screw area to hold it up a bit
    >> higher, and replacing the bar. I had the same problem in my Epson
    >> Stylus 900. Before I thought to do this fix I decided to move on to
    >> the Canon i960 for better prints and good, cheap non-OEM inks. Your
    >> 2200 is newer technology and a much better printer than my ES 900
    >> was, and I am not suggesting a change. If you don't find the answer
    >> on the MIS site you might also google the problem (might find it
    >> under pizza wheels Epson printers or Epson printer guide wheels) and
    >> see what you come up with. I like the solution I mentioned as it
    >> will give you a little more clearance and will probably solve the
    >> problem.
    >>
    >> "Alan Justice" <spam@spamspamspam.spam> wrote in message
    >> news:o1d7e.5672$lP1.4011@newsread1.news.pas.earthlink.net...
    >>
    >>> The exit rollers cause scuff marks on Epson Premium Glossy Photo
    >>> Paper on an
    >>> Epson 2200 printer. They are parallel lines, most visible on a uniform
    >>> color. It may be the increased fragiligy of the MediaStreet ink
    >>> (but they
    >>> claim Epson has acknowledged that problem for their inks, too).
    >>> They supply
    >>> "exit flags" to hold up the top exit rollers. This eliminates the
    >>> scuffing,
    >>> but then the paper comes out crooked at the end, and small sheets
    >>> (45x6)
    >>> simply stop feeding. I've tried changing the paper thickness
    >>> (regular or
    >>> envelopes).
    >>>
    >>> Is there a solution, such as a way to keep the paper going and going
    >>> straight without exit rollers?
    >>>
    >>> Is it a MediaStreet problem, or do Epson inks also behave this way?
    >>>
    >>> --
    >>> - Alan Justice
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>
    >>
    >>
  13. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Arthur Entlich wrote:

    > This problem was the result of Epson introducing some new papers after
    > the printer was produced, which dried more slowly with the Ultrachrome
    > inks. To the best of my knowledge, they resolved it with the R800 and
    > probably the R1800 printers.
    >
    > Color pigment inks are more difficult to make, to make paper for, and
    > to keep from clogging, which is probably why Canon stays away from them.
    > However, they have some advantages.


    Maybe as time goes on and technology improves the differences between
    the dye and pigment based inks will narrow as far as the problems
    encountered. The the dye prints with their better quality and vividness
    will be the better choice. Maybe Canon is riding that horse.

    >
    > Art
    >
    > measekite wrote:
    >
    >> Does this problem happen with the R series Epson Printers as well.
    >> Why do you hear about fewer problems with Canon printers on this NG?
    >>
    >> Ed Ruf wrote:
    >>
    >>> On Wed, 13 Apr 2005 17:54:28 GMT, in comp.periphs.printers "Alan
    >>> Justice" <spam@spamspamspam.spam> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>> The exit rollers cause scuff marks on Epson Premium Glossy Photo
    >>>> Paper on an
    >>>> Epson 2200 printer. They are parallel lines, most visible on a
    >>>> uniform
    >>>> color. It may be the increased fragiligy of the MediaStreet ink
    >>>> (but they
    >>>> claim Epson has acknowledged that problem for their inks, too).
    >>>> They supply
    >>>> "exit flags" to hold up the top exit rollers. This eliminates the
    >>>> scuffing,
    >>>> but then the paper comes out crooked at the end, and small sheets
    >>>> (45x6)
    >>>> simply stop feeding. I've tried changing the paper thickness
    >>>> (regular or
    >>>> envelopes).
    >>>>
    >>>> Is there a solution, such as a way to keep the paper going and going
    >>>> straight without exit rollers?
    >>>>
    >>>> Is it a MediaStreet problem, or do Epson inks also behave this way?
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Try setting the paper thickness setting to thick?
    >>>
    >>>
  14. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    On Fri, 15 Apr 2005 14:28:26 GMT, in comp.periphs.printers measekite
    <measekite@yahoo.com> wrote:

    >
    >Maybe as time goes on and technology improves the differences between
    >the dye and pigment based inks will narrow as far as the problems
    >encountered. The the dye prints with their better quality and vividness
    >will be the better choice. Maybe Canon is riding that horse.

    Not if permanence is of importance. Do you paint your house with pigments
    or dyes?
    ----------
    Ed Ruf Lifetime AMA# 344007 (Usenet@EdwardG.Ruf.com)
    http://EdwardGRuf.com
  15. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    "measekite" <measekite@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:67Q7e.4296$dT4.3129@newssvr13.news.prodigy.com...
    >
    >
    > Arthur Entlich wrote:
    >
    >> The 2200's design didn't fully take into account the slower drying speed
    >> of Ultrachrome inks with some papers. As a result, the image can be
    >> damaged by the rollers as it leaves the printer.
    >>
    >> There are a number of devices available (home brew to commercial) that
    >> lift part of the roller mechanism to reduce the pressure on the print as
    >> it leaves the printer when these circumstances develop.
    >
    >
    > What I am saying is not to be a matter of fact but posed as a question.
    > It appears that there are more design problems with Epson Printers, based
    > on the things I read here, than HP or Canon.
    >

    One other reason you don't hear so much of this problem with HP printers, is
    simply that lots of HP printers don't have these pizza wheels after the ink
    head in the paper path.

    But, Google for "HP roller marks" and you'll see that the HP design of
    pushing the paper through on large rollers has more than its fair share of
    paper-marking problems.
  16. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Ed Ruf wrote:

    >On Fri, 15 Apr 2005 14:28:26 GMT, in comp.periphs.printers measekite
    ><measekite@yahoo.com> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >>Maybe as time goes on and technology improves the differences between
    >>the dye and pigment based inks will narrow as far as the problems
    >>encountered. The the dye prints with their better quality and vividness
    >>will be the better choice. Maybe Canon is riding that horse.
    >>
    >>
    >
    >Not if permanence is of importance. Do you paint your house with pigments
    >or dyes?
    >
    >

    I don't paint my house! ;-)

    >----------
    >Ed Ruf Lifetime AMA# 344007 (Usenet@EdwardG.Ruf.com)
    >http://EdwardGRuf.com
    >
    >
  17. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    What you say may be true, however, it needs to be put into context.

    Epson has been very innovative in their designs from the very beginning,
    from the use of a piezo actuator, to the introduction of high fade
    resistant pigmented colorant inks, to addressing the fine art market
    with several dozen paper types. Each of these moves has brought the
    whole industry forward in terms of quality. Each involve risk, since
    often things are introduced for printers already on the market.

    Also, there is a segment of Epson owners who used their printers heavily
    and demandingly for fine art reproduction, and they are a demanding lot,
    so we probably hear more complaining from them, as well.

    There are certain design elements that IMHO, could and should be altered
    to improve functionality and cost in potential servicing. But leading
    edge deign often make more demands and expectations, and for Epson the
    expectations tend to be quite high, and some of their clientele are well
    educated in inkjet image production, so any slip up is one too many.
    Other companies may be able to get away with some of this, due to
    easier implementation of older known technology (Dye inks for instance)
    and a less demanding public.

    Art


    measekite wrote:

    >
    >
    > Arthur Entlich wrote:
    >
    >> The 2200's design didn't fully take into account the slower drying
    >> speed of Ultrachrome inks with some papers. As a result, the image can
    >> be damaged by the rollers as it leaves the printer.
    >>
    >> There are a number of devices available (home brew to commercial) that
    >> lift part of the roller mechanism to reduce the pressure on the print
    >> as it leaves the printer when these circumstances develop.
    >
    >
    >
    > What I am saying is not to be a matter of fact but posed as a question.
    > It appears that there are more design problems with Epson Printers,
    > based on the things I read here, than HP or Canon.
    >
    >>
    >> Art
    >>
  18. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    measekite wrote:

    >
    >
    > Arthur Entlich wrote:
    >
    >> This problem was the result of Epson introducing some new papers after
    >> the printer was produced, which dried more slowly with the Ultrachrome
    >> inks. To the best of my knowledge, they resolved it with the R800 and
    >> probably the R1800 printers.
    >>
    >> Color pigment inks are more difficult to make, to make paper for, and
    >> to keep from clogging, which is probably why Canon stays away from them.
    >> However, they have some advantages.
    >
    >
    >
    > Maybe as time goes on and technology improves the differences between
    > the dye and pigment based inks will narrow as far as the problems
    > encountered. The the dye prints with their better quality and vividness
    > will be the better choice. Maybe Canon is riding that horse.
    >
    >>
    >>


    Maybe, but they better get on the horse rather than run in back of it.
    Some of the ink formulations they are using are technically obsolete or
    at least very old and rejected by some manufacturers. They need to show
    a better formulated dye ink.

    Art
  19. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    I have recently bought the R1800 and have printed a couple of dozen
    A3+ borderless with no lines visible anywhere in any colours.


    Arthur Entlich <artistic@telus.net> wrote in message news:<2at8e.32633$yV3.21460@clgrps12>...
    > measekite wrote:
    >
    > >
    > >
    > > Arthur Entlich wrote:
    > >
    > >> This problem was the result of Epson introducing some new papers after
    > >> the printer was produced, which dried more slowly with the Ultrachrome
    > >> inks. To the best of my knowledge, they resolved it with the R800 and
    > >> probably the R1800 printers.
    > >>
    > >> Color pigment inks are more difficult to make, to make paper for, and
    > >> to keep from clogging, which is probably why Canon stays away from them.
    > >> However, they have some advantages.
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > Maybe as time goes on and technology improves the differences between
    > > the dye and pigment based inks will narrow as far as the problems
    > > encountered. The the dye prints with their better quality and vividness
    > > will be the better choice. Maybe Canon is riding that horse.
    > >
    > >>
    > >>
    >
    >
    > Maybe, but they better get on the horse rather than run in back of it.
    > Some of the ink formulations they are using are technically obsolete or
    > at least very old and rejected by some manufacturers. They need to show
    > a better formulated dye ink.
    >
    > Art
  20. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    I'd expect Epson redesigned the outport area of the printer so this
    problem didn't reappear. The Ultrachrome inks are very slow drying on
    some media.

    Art

    John Worsfold wrote:

    > I have recently bought the R1800 and have printed a couple of dozen
    > A3+ borderless with no lines visible anywhere in any colours.
    >
    >
  21. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    I've only used the Epson Premium Glossy Photo papers. Do you think there
    would be less of a scuffing if I switched to another paper?

    Is there any way to slow up the printing, so there is longer to dry?
    (Increasing time between sheets wouldn't work.)

    --
    - Alan Justice

    "Arthur Entlich" <artistic@telus.net> wrote in message
    news:qgN7e.31868$yV3.7369@clgrps12...
    > This problem was the result of Epson introducing some new papers after
    > the printer was produced, which dried more slowly with the Ultrachrome
    > inks. To the best of my knowledge, they resolved it with the R800 and
    > probably the R1800 printers.
    >
    > Color pigment inks are more difficult to make, to make paper for, and to
    > keep from clogging, which is probably why Canon stays away from them.
    > However, they have some advantages.
    >
    > Art
    >
    > measekite wrote:
    >
    > > Does this problem happen with the R series Epson Printers as well.
    > > Why do you hear about fewer problems with Canon printers on this NG?
    > >
    > > Ed Ruf wrote:
    > >
    > >> On Wed, 13 Apr 2005 17:54:28 GMT, in comp.periphs.printers "Alan
    > >> Justice" <spam@spamspamspam.spam> wrote:
    > >>
    > >>
    > >>
    > >>> The exit rollers cause scuff marks on Epson Premium Glossy Photo
    > >>> Paper on an
    > >>> Epson 2200 printer. They are parallel lines, most visible on a
    uniform
    > >>> color. It may be the increased fragiligy of the MediaStreet ink (but
    > >>> they
    > >>> claim Epson has acknowledged that problem for their inks, too). They
    > >>> supply
    > >>> "exit flags" to hold up the top exit rollers. This eliminates the
    > >>> scuffing,
    > >>> but then the paper comes out crooked at the end, and small sheets
    (45x6)
    > >>> simply stop feeding. I've tried changing the paper thickness
    > >>> (regular or
    > >>> envelopes).
    > >>>
    > >>> Is there a solution, such as a way to keep the paper going and going
    > >>> straight without exit rollers?
    > >>>
    > >>> Is it a MediaStreet problem, or do Epson inks also behave this way?
    > >>>
    > >>
    > >>
    > >>
    > >> Try setting the paper thickness setting to thick?
    > >>
    > >>
  22. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Unfortunately, those exit rollers do serve a purpose. By propping them up,
    the paper is not held or advanced during about the last 1/2", so it goes
    askew.

    --
    - Alan Justice

    "Arthur Entlich" <artistic@telus.net> wrote in message
    news:rVM7e.28745$VF5.5050@edtnps89...
    > The 2200's design didn't fully take into account the slower drying speed
    > of Ultrachrome inks with some papers. As a result, the image can be
    > damaged by the rollers as it leaves the printer.
    >
    > There are a number of devices available (home brew to commercial) that
    > lift part of the roller mechanism to reduce the pressure on the print as
    > it leaves the printer when these circumstances develop.
    >
    > Art
    >
    > Burt wrote:
    >
    > > Sounds like the famous Epson "pizza cutter" wheels. Open the lid and
    look
    > > in the feed area where the paper comes out after printing and you will
    see
    > > serrated wheels on top of the print. They are known to cause faint
    marks in
    > > dark uniform areas. I have been told that these wheels are absolutely
    > > unnecessary, but I wouldn't swear to it! I believe you can find a fix
    for
    > > it on the MIS ink website. It involves removing the bar that carries
    these
    > > wheel guides, putting a thin washer under the bar at each screw area to
    hold
    > > it up a bit higher, and replacing the bar. I had the same problem in my
    > > Epson Stylus 900. Before I thought to do this fix I decided to move on
    to
    > > the Canon i960 for better prints and good, cheap non-OEM inks. Your
    2200 is
    > > newer technology and a much better printer than my ES 900 was, and I am
    not
    > > suggesting a change. If you don't find the answer on the MIS site you
    might
    > > also google the problem (might find it under pizza wheels Epson printers
    or
    > > Epson printer guide wheels) and see what you come up with. I like the
    > > solution I mentioned as it will give you a little more clearance and
    will
    > > probably solve the problem.
    > >
    > > "Alan Justice" <spam@spamspamspam.spam> wrote in message
    > > news:o1d7e.5672$lP1.4011@newsread1.news.pas.earthlink.net...
    > >
    > >>The exit rollers cause scuff marks on Epson Premium Glossy Photo Paper
    on
    > >>an
    > >>Epson 2200 printer. They are parallel lines, most visible on a uniform
    > >>color. It may be the increased fragiligy of the MediaStreet ink (but
    they
    > >>claim Epson has acknowledged that problem for their inks, too). They
    > >>supply
    > >>"exit flags" to hold up the top exit rollers. This eliminates the
    > >>scuffing,
    > >>but then the paper comes out crooked at the end, and small sheets (45x6)
    > >>simply stop feeding. I've tried changing the paper thickness (regular
    or
    > >>envelopes).
    > >>
    > >>Is there a solution, such as a way to keep the paper going and going
    > >>straight without exit rollers?
    > >>
    > >>Is it a MediaStreet problem, or do Epson inks also behave this way?
    > >>
    > >>--
    > >>- Alan Justice
    > >>
    > >>
    > >>
    > >
    > >
    > >
  23. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    On Mon, 18 Apr 2005 16:36:28 GMT, "Alan Justice"
    <spam@spamspamspam.spam> wrote:

    >I've only used the Epson Premium Glossy Photo papers. Do you think there
    >would be less of a scuffing if I switched to another paper?

    Yes. Use matt or satin (Semi gloss) papers. The inks take forever to
    dry on glossy and when they do they bronze anyway.

    --

    Hecate - The Real One
    Hecate@newsguy.com
    Fashion: Buying things you don't need, with money
    you don't have, to impress people you don't like...
  24. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Hecate wrote:

    >On Mon, 18 Apr 2005 16:36:28 GMT, "Alan Justice"
    ><spam@spamspamspam.spam> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >>I've only used the Epson Premium Glossy Photo papers. Do you think there
    >>would be less of a scuffing if I switched to another paper?
    >>
    >>
    >
    >Yes. Use matt or satin (Semi gloss) papers. The inks take forever to
    >dry on glossy and when they do they bronze anyway.
    >
    >
    >

    My Canon IP4000 has not had any problem of this kind. It produces
    beautiful glossy prints. So far I have not experienced any fading but
    time will tell.

    > --
    >
    >Hecate - The Real One
    >Hecate@newsguy.com
    >Fashion: Buying things you don't need, with money
    >you don't have, to impress people you don't like...
    >
    >
  25. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    I live on the north coast of California, where it rains about 80" a year.
    Could the humidity be slowing down the ink drying, so that I get the scuff
    marks from the exit rollers, and, now, marks from the pizza wheels? Would a
    fan help? Dehumidifier?

    --
    - Alan Justice

    "Alan Justice" <spam@spamspamspam.spam> wrote in message
    news:4pw7e.6334$An2.2705@newsread2.news.pas.earthlink.net...
    > The "pizza wheels" come before the exit wheels, and are closer together.
    > The scuffs are from the exit wheels (two apposing). I can inactivate some
    > of them, but with all out, the paper doesn't feed right.
    >
    > --
    > - Alan Justice
    >
    > "Burt" <sfbjgNOSPAM@pacbell.net> wrote in message
    > news:o1j7e.1446$J12.49@newssvr14.news.prodigy.com...
    > > Sounds like the famous Epson "pizza cutter" wheels. Open the lid and
    look
    > > in the feed area where the paper comes out after printing and you will
    see
    > > serrated wheels on top of the print. They are known to cause faint
    marks
    > in
    > > dark uniform areas. I have been told that these wheels are absolutely
    > > unnecessary, but I wouldn't swear to it! I believe you can find a fix
    for
    > > it on the MIS ink website. It involves removing the bar that carries
    > these
    > > wheel guides, putting a thin washer under the bar at each screw area to
    > hold
    > > it up a bit higher, and replacing the bar. I had the same problem in my
    > > Epson Stylus 900. Before I thought to do this fix I decided to move on
    to
    > > the Canon i960 for better prints and good, cheap non-OEM inks. Your
    2200
    > is
    > > newer technology and a much better printer than my ES 900 was, and I am
    > not
    > > suggesting a change. If you don't find the answer on the MIS site you
    > might
    > > also google the problem (might find it under pizza wheels Epson printers
    > or
    > > Epson printer guide wheels) and see what you come up with. I like the
    > > solution I mentioned as it will give you a little more clearance and
    will
    > > probably solve the problem.
    > >
    > > "Alan Justice" <spam@spamspamspam.spam> wrote in message
    > > news:o1d7e.5672$lP1.4011@newsread1.news.pas.earthlink.net...
    > > > The exit rollers cause scuff marks on Epson Premium Glossy Photo Paper
    > on
    > > > an
    > > > Epson 2200 printer. They are parallel lines, most visible on a
    uniform
    > > > color. It may be the increased fragiligy of the MediaStreet ink (but
    > they
    > > > claim Epson has acknowledged that problem for their inks, too). They
    > > > supply
    > > > "exit flags" to hold up the top exit rollers. This eliminates the
    > > > scuffing,
    > > > but then the paper comes out crooked at the end, and small sheets
    (45x6)
    > > > simply stop feeding. I've tried changing the paper thickness (regular
    > or
    > > > envelopes).
    > > >
    > > > Is there a solution, such as a way to keep the paper going and going
    > > > straight without exit rollers?
    > > >
    > > > Is it a MediaStreet problem, or do Epson inks also behave this way?
    > > >
    > > > --
    > > > - Alan Justice
    > > >
    > > >
    > > >
    > >
    > >
    >
    >
  26. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    On Tue, 19 Apr 2005 01:12:15 GMT, measekite <measekite@yahoo.com>
    wrote:

    >
    >
    >Hecate wrote:
    >
    >>On Mon, 18 Apr 2005 16:36:28 GMT, "Alan Justice"
    >><spam@spamspamspam.spam> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>>I've only used the Epson Premium Glossy Photo papers. Do you think there
    >>>would be less of a scuffing if I switched to another paper?
    >>>
    >>>
    >>
    >>Yes. Use matt or satin (Semi gloss) papers. The inks take forever to
    >>dry on glossy and when they do they bronze anyway.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >
    >My Canon IP4000 has not had any problem of this kind. It produces
    >beautiful glossy prints. So far I have not experienced any fading but
    >time will tell.
    >
    It wouldn't. It's dye based. It's usable with glossy. The only
    difference is colour depth and longevity, or, in the case of Canon
    "shortevity".

    --

    Hecate - The Real One
    Hecate@newsguy.com
    Fashion: Buying things you don't need, with money
    you don't have, to impress people you don't like...
  27. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Most people do not experience a problem as a result of moving the exit
    rollers up slightly, from the reports I've received. Perhaps they do
    not print on the last 1/2" of the paper.

    There are a number of web pages from several of the 3rd party ink
    companies and elsewhere that make suggestions on resolving this issue.

    I also believe there is an adjustment in the driver that allows for the
    printing process to be slowed down.

    Glossy papers are more prone to this problem than matte papers.

    Art

    Alan Justice wrote:

    > Unfortunately, those exit rollers do serve a purpose. By propping them up,
    > the paper is not held or advanced during about the last 1/2", so it goes
    > askew.
    >
    > --
    > - Alan Justice
    >
    > "Arthur Entlich" <artistic@telus.net> wrote in message
    > news:rVM7e.28745$VF5.5050@edtnps89...
    >
    >>The 2200's design didn't fully take into account the slower drying speed
    >>of Ultrachrome inks with some papers. As a result, the image can be
    >>damaged by the rollers as it leaves the printer.
    >>
    >>There are a number of devices available (home brew to commercial) that
    >>lift part of the roller mechanism to reduce the pressure on the print as
    >>it leaves the printer when these circumstances develop.
    >>
    >>Art
    >>
    >>Burt wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>Sounds like the famous Epson "pizza cutter" wheels. Open the lid and
    >
    > look
    >
    >>>in the feed area where the paper comes out after printing and you will
    >
    > see
    >
    >>>serrated wheels on top of the print. They are known to cause faint
    >
    > marks in
    >
    >>>dark uniform areas. I have been told that these wheels are absolutely
    >>>unnecessary, but I wouldn't swear to it! I believe you can find a fix
    >
    > for
    >
    >>>it on the MIS ink website. It involves removing the bar that carries
    >
    > these
    >
    >>>wheel guides, putting a thin washer under the bar at each screw area to
    >
    > hold
    >
    >>>it up a bit higher, and replacing the bar. I had the same problem in my
    >>>Epson Stylus 900. Before I thought to do this fix I decided to move on
    >
    > to
    >
    >>>the Canon i960 for better prints and good, cheap non-OEM inks. Your
    >
    > 2200 is
    >
    >>>newer technology and a much better printer than my ES 900 was, and I am
    >
    > not
    >
    >>>suggesting a change. If you don't find the answer on the MIS site you
    >
    > might
    >
    >>>also google the problem (might find it under pizza wheels Epson printers
    >
    > or
    >
    >>>Epson printer guide wheels) and see what you come up with. I like the
    >>>solution I mentioned as it will give you a little more clearance and
    >
    > will
    >
    >>>probably solve the problem.
    >>>
    >>>"Alan Justice" <spam@spamspamspam.spam> wrote in message
    >>>news:o1d7e.5672$lP1.4011@newsread1.news.pas.earthlink.net...
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>The exit rollers cause scuff marks on Epson Premium Glossy Photo Paper
    >
    > on
    >
    >>>>an
    >>>>Epson 2200 printer. They are parallel lines, most visible on a uniform
    >>>>color. It may be the increased fragiligy of the MediaStreet ink (but
    >
    > they
    >
    >>>>claim Epson has acknowledged that problem for their inks, too). They
    >>>>supply
    >>>>"exit flags" to hold up the top exit rollers. This eliminates the
    >>>>scuffing,
    >>>>but then the paper comes out crooked at the end, and small sheets (45x6)
    >>>>simply stop feeding. I've tried changing the paper thickness (regular
    >
    > or
    >
    >>>>envelopes).
    >>>>
    >>>>Is there a solution, such as a way to keep the paper going and going
    >>>>straight without exit rollers?
    >>>>
    >>>>Is it a MediaStreet problem, or do Epson inks also behave this way?
    >>>>
    >>>>--
    >>>>- Alan Justice
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >
    >
  28. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    I should probably just ignore you at this point, because you know full
    well that there is no comparison between the Canon IP4000 and the Epson
    2200 in terms of the nature of the requirements of the output.

    The IP4000 is a dye ink printer, letter size and uses CMYK (4) colors.

    The 2200 is a pigment, resin encapsulated ink printer, medium carriage
    size (13") and uses CcMmYKK (6) colors.

    Whether your print fade or not isn't the issue for anyone other than
    yourself. I would warn anyone who needs image permanence, either for
    their own purposes or if they sell their work, not to use Canon OEM
    inks. All dye inks fade, and Canon's tends to do so more quickly than
    other manufacturer's OEM inks of today. There may be 3rd party inks for
    Canon printers that are better, however.

    The inks supplied with the Epson 2200 have been rigorously tested by 3rd
    party professional labs. They have very good fade resistance. Those
    same qualities that make these inks so permanent can also cause some of
    the drying problems with inks on glossy paper. Epson resolved this by
    changing the design of the exit wheels of newer printer using these
    types of inks. Most people who use the 2200 have resolved the problem
    when they use glossy papers by rasing those wheels without consequence.

    If your ignorance wasn't so intentional, I'd be much more forgiving, but
    the fact that you intentionally lie by omission, does no one any benefit
    who reads your posts, and I can only recommend to others that they do
    not consider your experiences and recommendations seriously since your
    credibility is flawed and they may be sorry for considering your
    comments in making their purchasing decisions.

    Art


    measekite wrote:

    >
    >
    > Hecate wrote:
    >
    >> On Mon, 18 Apr 2005 16:36:28 GMT, "Alan Justice"
    >> <spam@spamspamspam.spam> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>> I've only used the Epson Premium Glossy Photo papers. Do you think
    >>> there
    >>> would be less of a scuffing if I switched to another paper?
    >>>
    >>
    >>
    >> Yes. Use matt or satin (Semi gloss) papers. The inks take forever to
    >> dry on glossy and when they do they bronze anyway.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >
    > My Canon IP4000 has not had any problem of this kind. It produces
    > beautiful glossy prints. So far I have not experienced any fading but
    > time will tell.
    >
    >> --
    >>
    >> Hecate - The Real One
    >> Hecate@newsguy.com Fashion: Buying things you don't need, with money
    >> you don't have, to impress people you don't like...
    >>
    >>
  29. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Firstly, to answer your question, yes, excess humidity will have it's
    effect.

    Not just because the ink dries more slowly, but because the paper is
    hydroscopic and absorbs moisture. You might wish to keep the stored
    blank paper sealed as much as possible, or even toss some silica gel
    with the paper in a paper storage device.

    I know of some people who were using hair dryers with their 2200 output
    to try to dry it more rapidly. Results were variable, and I'm sure that
    heat is not good for the synthetic rubber wheels.

    I would suggest you look into the issue on Google. There are several
    web sites offering easy ways to adapt your printer to resolve the exit
    wheel issue. There is something for the "pizza" wheels as well, but in
    some models that requires surgery.

    BTW, I live on the west coast of Vancouver Islands, and we have similar
    rainfall issues part of the year.

    Art


    Alan Justice wrote:

    > I live on the north coast of California, where it rains about 80" a year.
    > Could the humidity be slowing down the ink drying, so that I get the scuff
    > marks from the exit rollers, and, now, marks from the pizza wheels? Would a
    > fan help? Dehumidifier?
    >
    > --
    > - Alan Justice
    >
    > "Alan Justice" <spam@spamspamspam.spam> wrote in message
    > news:4pw7e.6334$An2.2705@newsread2.news.pas.earthlink.net...
    >
    >>The "pizza wheels" come before the exit wheels, and are closer together.
    >>The scuffs are from the exit wheels (two apposing). I can inactivate some
    >>of them, but with all out, the paper doesn't feed right.
    >>
    >>--
    >>- Alan Justice
    >>
    >>"Burt" <sfbjgNOSPAM@pacbell.net> wrote in message
    >>news:o1j7e.1446$J12.49@newssvr14.news.prodigy.com...
    >>
    >>>Sounds like the famous Epson "pizza cutter" wheels. Open the lid and
    >
    > look
    >
    >>>in the feed area where the paper comes out after printing and you will
    >
    > see
    >
    >>>serrated wheels on top of the print. They are known to cause faint
    >
    > marks
    >
    >>in
    >>
    >>>dark uniform areas. I have been told that these wheels are absolutely
    >>>unnecessary, but I wouldn't swear to it! I believe you can find a fix
    >
    > for
    >
    >>>it on the MIS ink website. It involves removing the bar that carries
    >>
    >>these
    >>
    >>>wheel guides, putting a thin washer under the bar at each screw area to
    >>
    >>hold
    >>
    >>>it up a bit higher, and replacing the bar. I had the same problem in my
    >>>Epson Stylus 900. Before I thought to do this fix I decided to move on
    >
    > to
    >
    >>>the Canon i960 for better prints and good, cheap non-OEM inks. Your
    >
    > 2200
    >
    >>is
    >>
    >>>newer technology and a much better printer than my ES 900 was, and I am
    >>
    >>not
    >>
    >>>suggesting a change. If you don't find the answer on the MIS site you
    >>
    >>might
    >>
    >>>also google the problem (might find it under pizza wheels Epson printers
    >>
    >>or
    >>
    >>>Epson printer guide wheels) and see what you come up with. I like the
    >>>solution I mentioned as it will give you a little more clearance and
    >
    > will
    >
    >>>probably solve the problem.
    >>>
    >>>"Alan Justice" <spam@spamspamspam.spam> wrote in message
    >>>news:o1d7e.5672$lP1.4011@newsread1.news.pas.earthlink.net...
    >>>
    >>>>The exit rollers cause scuff marks on Epson Premium Glossy Photo Paper
    >>
    >>on
    >>
    >>>>an
    >>>>Epson 2200 printer. They are parallel lines, most visible on a
    >
    > uniform
    >
    >>>>color. It may be the increased fragiligy of the MediaStreet ink (but
    >>
    >>they
    >>
    >>>>claim Epson has acknowledged that problem for their inks, too). They
    >>>>supply
    >>>>"exit flags" to hold up the top exit rollers. This eliminates the
    >>>>scuffing,
    >>>>but then the paper comes out crooked at the end, and small sheets
    >
    > (45x6)
    >
    >>>>simply stop feeding. I've tried changing the paper thickness (regular
    >>
    >>or
    >>
    >>>>envelopes).
    >>>>
    >>>>Is there a solution, such as a way to keep the paper going and going
    >>>>straight without exit rollers?
    >>>>
    >>>>Is it a MediaStreet problem, or do Epson inks also behave this way?
    >>>>
    >>>>--
    >>>>- Alan Justice
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>
    >
    >
  30. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Arthur Entlich wrote:

    > I should probably just ignore you at this point, because you know full
    > well that there is no comparison between the Canon IP4000 and the
    > Epson 2200 in terms of the nature of the requirements of the output.
    >
    > The IP4000 is a dye ink printer, letter size and uses CMYK (4) colors.
    >
    > The 2200 is a pigment, resin encapsulated ink printer, medium carriage
    > size (13") and uses CcMmYKK (6) colors.


    I hear the high gloss prints do not look so good. That is why the R1800
    has a gloss optomizer that is supposed to be a big improvement. Still,
    people that have seen the results of both have said (and on this NG
    also) that prints from a dye based printer (especially Canon Pixma
    Printers and the i Series) are much more striking and vivid.

    >
    > Whether your print fade or not isn't the issue for anyone other than
    > yourself. I would warn anyone who needs image permanence, either for
    > their own purposes or if they sell their work, not to use Canon OEM
    > inks. All dye inks fade, and Canon's tends to do so more quickly than
    > other manufacturer's OEM inks of today. There may be 3rd party inks
    > for Canon printers that are better, however.
    >
    > The inks supplied with the Epson 2200 have been rigorously tested by
    > 3rd party professional labs. They have very good fade resistance.
    > Those same qualities that make these inks so permanent can also cause
    > some of the drying problems with inks on glossy paper. Epson resolved
    > this by changing the design of the exit wheels of newer printer using
    > these types of inks. Most people who use the 2200 have resolved the
    > problem when they use glossy papers by rasing those wheels without
    > consequence.
    >
    > If your ignorance wasn't so intentional, I'd be much more forgiving,
    > but the fact that you intentionally lie by omission, does no one any
    > benefit who reads your posts, and I can only recommend to others that
    > they do not consider your experiences and recommendations seriously
    > since your credibility is flawed and they may be sorry for considering
    > your comments in making their purchasing decisions.
    >
    > Art
    >
    >
    > measekite wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>
    >> Hecate wrote:
    >>
    >>> On Mon, 18 Apr 2005 16:36:28 GMT, "Alan Justice"
    >>> <spam@spamspamspam.spam> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>> I've only used the Epson Premium Glossy Photo papers. Do you think
    >>>> there
    >>>> would be less of a scuffing if I switched to another paper?
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Yes. Use matt or satin (Semi gloss) papers. The inks take forever to
    >>> dry on glossy and when they do they bronze anyway.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>
    >> My Canon IP4000 has not had any problem of this kind. It produces
    >> beautiful glossy prints. So far I have not experienced any fading
    >> but time will tell.
    >>
    >>> --
    >>>
    >>> Hecate - The Real One
    >>> Hecate@newsguy.com Fashion: Buying things you don't need, with money
    >>> you don't have, to impress people you don't like...
    >>>
    >>>
  31. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Thanks for the suggestions. I'll try dried vs undried paper.

    --
    - Alan Justice

    "Arthur Entlich" <artistic@telus.net> wrote in message
    news:_1o9e.34787$yV3.10014@clgrps12...
    > Firstly, to answer your question, yes, excess humidity will have it's
    > effect.
    >
    > Not just because the ink dries more slowly, but because the paper is
    > hydroscopic and absorbs moisture. You might wish to keep the stored
    > blank paper sealed as much as possible, or even toss some silica gel
    > with the paper in a paper storage device.
    >
    > I know of some people who were using hair dryers with their 2200 output
    > to try to dry it more rapidly. Results were variable, and I'm sure that
    > heat is not good for the synthetic rubber wheels.
    >
    > I would suggest you look into the issue on Google. There are several
    > web sites offering easy ways to adapt your printer to resolve the exit
    > wheel issue. There is something for the "pizza" wheels as well, but in
    > some models that requires surgery.
    >
    > BTW, I live on the west coast of Vancouver Islands, and we have similar
    > rainfall issues part of the year.
    >
    > Art
    >
    >
    > Alan Justice wrote:
    >
    > > I live on the north coast of California, where it rains about 80" a
    year.
    > > Could the humidity be slowing down the ink drying, so that I get the
    scuff
    > > marks from the exit rollers, and, now, marks from the pizza wheels?
    Would a
    > > fan help? Dehumidifier?
    > >
    > > --
    > > - Alan Justice
    > >
    > > "Alan Justice" <spam@spamspamspam.spam> wrote in message
    > > news:4pw7e.6334$An2.2705@newsread2.news.pas.earthlink.net...
    > >
    > >>The "pizza wheels" come before the exit wheels, and are closer
    together.
    > >>The scuffs are from the exit wheels (two apposing). I can inactivate
    some
    > >>of them, but with all out, the paper doesn't feed right.
    > >>
    > >>--
    > >>- Alan Justice
    > >>
    > >>"Burt" <sfbjgNOSPAM@pacbell.net> wrote in message
    > >>news:o1j7e.1446$J12.49@newssvr14.news.prodigy.com...
    > >>
    > >>>Sounds like the famous Epson "pizza cutter" wheels. Open the lid and
    > >
    > > look
    > >
    > >>>in the feed area where the paper comes out after printing and you will
    > >
    > > see
    > >
    > >>>serrated wheels on top of the print. They are known to cause faint
    > >
    > > marks
    > >
    > >>in
    > >>
    > >>>dark uniform areas. I have been told that these wheels are absolutely
    > >>>unnecessary, but I wouldn't swear to it! I believe you can find a fix
    > >
    > > for
    > >
    > >>>it on the MIS ink website. It involves removing the bar that carries
    > >>
    > >>these
    > >>
    > >>>wheel guides, putting a thin washer under the bar at each screw area to
    > >>
    > >>hold
    > >>
    > >>>it up a bit higher, and replacing the bar. I had the same problem in
    my
    > >>>Epson Stylus 900. Before I thought to do this fix I decided to move on
    > >
    > > to
    > >
    > >>>the Canon i960 for better prints and good, cheap non-OEM inks. Your
    > >
    > > 2200
    > >
    > >>is
    > >>
    > >>>newer technology and a much better printer than my ES 900 was, and I am
    > >>
    > >>not
    > >>
    > >>>suggesting a change. If you don't find the answer on the MIS site you
    > >>
    > >>might
    > >>
    > >>>also google the problem (might find it under pizza wheels Epson
    printers
    > >>
    > >>or
    > >>
    > >>>Epson printer guide wheels) and see what you come up with. I like the
    > >>>solution I mentioned as it will give you a little more clearance and
    > >
    > > will
    > >
    > >>>probably solve the problem.
    > >>>
    > >>>"Alan Justice" <spam@spamspamspam.spam> wrote in message
    > >>>news:o1d7e.5672$lP1.4011@newsread1.news.pas.earthlink.net...
    > >>>
    > >>>>The exit rollers cause scuff marks on Epson Premium Glossy Photo Paper
    > >>
    > >>on
    > >>
    > >>>>an
    > >>>>Epson 2200 printer. They are parallel lines, most visible on a
    > >
    > > uniform
    > >
    > >>>>color. It may be the increased fragiligy of the MediaStreet ink (but
    > >>
    > >>they
    > >>
    > >>>>claim Epson has acknowledged that problem for their inks, too). They
    > >>>>supply
    > >>>>"exit flags" to hold up the top exit rollers. This eliminates the
    > >>>>scuffing,
    > >>>>but then the paper comes out crooked at the end, and small sheets
    > >
    > > (45x6)
    > >
    > >>>>simply stop feeding. I've tried changing the paper thickness (regular
    > >>
    > >>or
    > >>
    > >>>>envelopes).
    > >>>>
    > >>>>Is there a solution, such as a way to keep the paper going and going
    > >>>>straight without exit rollers?
    > >>>>
    > >>>>Is it a MediaStreet problem, or do Epson inks also behave this way?
    > >>>>
    > >>>>--
    > >>>>- Alan Justice
    > >>>>
    > >>>>
    > >>>>
    > >>>
    > >>>
    > >>
    > >
    > >
  32. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    On Wed, 20 Apr 2005 06:51:35 GMT, Arthur Entlich <artistic@telus.net>
    wrote:

    >I should probably just ignore you at this point, because you know full
    >well that there is no comparison between the Canon IP4000 and the Epson
    >2200 in terms of the nature of the requirements of the output.
    >
    I wouldn't bother. It's perfectly clear that he just doesn't
    understand the difference.

    --

    Hecate - The Real One
    Hecate@newsguy.com
    Fashion: Buying things you don't need, with money
    you don't have, to impress people you don't like...
  33. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    well, it's not the humidity... I live in high desert (really... nearly
    1.25 miles above sea level) where it's extremely dry.

    I'm having the same roller scuff issue using the Niagra system on my
    2200. I just tried using the exit flags, but the cart crashed into
    the exit wheels and caused the paper to fail to feed. The result was
    a pool of ink on one end of somewhat expensive paper.

    I did not have this problem with the Epson Ultrachrome inks on Premium
    Luster, Premium Glossy, or Enhanced Matte (all from espon, in sizes up
    to Super B). However, I switched to the Mediastreet system
    and tried using Ilford Smooth Pearl
    (13x19) and have had nothing but problems in continuous tone images.
    Smaller 4x6 on glossy stock doesn't seem to have a problem.

    So, I can't offer anything but sympathy at this point. I hope I
    haven't hosed my 2200 with those damned flags... any idea how to get
    them to work properly??
  34. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    I cannot recall offhand, but one type of Ilford paper is considered
    completely inappropriate for Epson pigment colorant inks. Ilford has
    two types, Classic and Smooth. Also what inks are you using with your
    bulk ink systems?

    Art

    lokki wrote:

    > well, it's not the humidity... I live in high desert (really... nearly
    > 1.25 miles above sea level) where it's extremely dry.
    >
    > I'm having the same roller scuff issue using the Niagra system on my
    > 2200. I just tried using the exit flags, but the cart crashed into
    > the exit wheels and caused the paper to fail to feed. The result was
    > a pool of ink on one end of somewhat expensive paper.
    >
    > I did not have this problem with the Epson Ultrachrome inks on Premium
    > Luster, Premium Glossy, or Enhanced Matte (all from espon, in sizes up
    > to Super B). However, I switched to the Mediastreet system
    > and tried using Ilford Smooth Pearl
    > (13x19) and have had nothing but problems in continuous tone images.
    > Smaller 4x6 on glossy stock doesn't seem to have a problem.
    >
    > So, I can't offer anything but sympathy at this point. I hope I
    > haven't hosed my 2200 with those damned flags... any idea how to get
    > them to work properly??
    >
  35. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Hi Arthur,

    I hadn't heard about the Ilford papers - time to google! Should have
    done that, before...

    I am using the MediaStreet G-chrome w/ photo black. On Epson's premium
    glossy, they look incredible, and seem to sit in the resin very nicely
    (no metamerism or bronzing).

    Truth be known, I really wish I'd bought the matte inks. Most of the
    images I print look much better on matte papers, but the photo ink
    (as expected) is too light. My prints don't usually have solid white
    areas, and I'm not keen on gloss for anything larger than 5x7
    portraiture. Even premium lustre at 8x10 is pushing it for me.
  36. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    I happen to also prefer matte surfaces for fine art images. They
    provide a more "absorbing" image with less barrier from the paper
    surface, visually.

    Art

    lokki wrote:

    > Hi Arthur,
    >
    > I hadn't heard about the Ilford papers - time to google! Should have
    > done that, before...
    >
    > I am using the MediaStreet G-chrome w/ photo black. On Epson's premium
    > glossy, they look incredible, and seem to sit in the resin very nicely
    > (no metamerism or bronzing).
    >
    > Truth be known, I really wish I'd bought the matte inks. Most of the
    > images I print look much better on matte papers, but the photo ink
    > (as expected) is too light. My prints don't usually have solid white
    > areas, and I'm not keen on gloss for anything larger than 5x7
    > portraiture. Even premium lustre at 8x10 is pushing it for me.
    >
  37. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    I get the scuffing on Epson Premium Glossy. Do you recommend another paper
    (that would dry faster, I guess) that won't be plagued by the scuffing?

    --
    - Alan Justice

    "Arthur Entlich" <artistic@telus.net> wrote in message
    news:svobe.6905$tg1.6469@edtnps84...
    > I happen to also prefer matte surfaces for fine art images. They
    > provide a more "absorbing" image with less barrier from the paper
    > surface, visually.
    >
    > Art
    >
    > lokki wrote:
    >
    > > Hi Arthur,
    > >
    > > I hadn't heard about the Ilford papers - time to google! Should have
    > > done that, before...
    > >
    > > I am using the MediaStreet G-chrome w/ photo black. On Epson's premium
    > > glossy, they look incredible, and seem to sit in the resin very nicely
    > > (no metamerism or bronzing).
    > >
    > > Truth be known, I really wish I'd bought the matte inks. Most of the
    > > images I print look much better on matte papers, but the photo ink
    > > (as expected) is too light. My prints don't usually have solid white
    > > areas, and I'm not keen on gloss for anything larger than 5x7
    > > portraiture. Even premium lustre at 8x10 is pushing it for me.
    > >
  38. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    If you like matte papers, try one of Epson's matte surfaces, like
    Enhanced Matte, or Velvet Fine Art, or Watercolor paper. In the glossy,
    the recommend ones include: Premium Glossy Photo (which you have tried),
    Premium Luster and Premium Semigloss.

    There are instructions on raising the rubber output wheels to prevent
    the streaking, (look it up in Google).

    Art

    Alan Justice wrote:

    > I get the scuffing on Epson Premium Glossy. Do you recommend another paper
    > (that would dry faster, I guess) that won't be plagued by the scuffing?
    >
    > --
    > - Alan Justice
    >
    > "Arthur Entlich" <artistic@telus.net> wrote in message
    > news:svobe.6905$tg1.6469@edtnps84...
    >
    >>I happen to also prefer matte surfaces for fine art images. They
    >>provide a more "absorbing" image with less barrier from the paper
    >>surface, visually.
    >>
    >>Art
    >>
    >>lokki wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>Hi Arthur,
    >>>
    >>>I hadn't heard about the Ilford papers - time to google! Should have
    >>>done that, before...
    >>>
    >>>I am using the MediaStreet G-chrome w/ photo black. On Epson's premium
    >>>glossy, they look incredible, and seem to sit in the resin very nicely
    >>>(no metamerism or bronzing).
    >>>
    >>>Truth be known, I really wish I'd bought the matte inks. Most of the
    >>>images I print look much better on matte papers, but the photo ink
    >>>(as expected) is too light. My prints don't usually have solid white
    >>>areas, and I'm not keen on gloss for anything larger than 5x7
    >>>portraiture. Even premium lustre at 8x10 is pushing it for me.
    >>>
    >
    >
    >
  39. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    MediaStreet supplies "flags" to raise the wheels, but doing so causes the
    paper to feed crooked toward the end. I'm about ready to give up on MS inks
    and go back to Epson.

    --
    - Alan Justice

    "Arthur Entlich" <e-printerhelp@mvps.org> wrote in message
    news:o_pce.9643$3V3.1932@edtnps89...
    > If you like matte papers, try one of Epson's matte surfaces, like
    > Enhanced Matte, or Velvet Fine Art, or Watercolor paper. In the glossy,
    > the recommend ones include: Premium Glossy Photo (which you have tried),
    > Premium Luster and Premium Semigloss.
    >
    > There are instructions on raising the rubber output wheels to prevent
    > the streaking, (look it up in Google).
    >
    > Art
    >
    > Alan Justice wrote:
    >
    > > I get the scuffing on Epson Premium Glossy. Do you recommend another
    paper
    > > (that would dry faster, I guess) that won't be plagued by the scuffing?
    > >
    > > --
    > > - Alan Justice
    > >
    > > "Arthur Entlich" <artistic@telus.net> wrote in message
    > > news:svobe.6905$tg1.6469@edtnps84...
    > >
    > >>I happen to also prefer matte surfaces for fine art images. They
    > >>provide a more "absorbing" image with less barrier from the paper
    > >>surface, visually.
    > >>
    > >>Art
    > >>
    > >>lokki wrote:
    > >>
    > >>
    > >>>Hi Arthur,
    > >>>
    > >>>I hadn't heard about the Ilford papers - time to google! Should have
    > >>>done that, before...
    > >>>
    > >>>I am using the MediaStreet G-chrome w/ photo black. On Epson's premium
    > >>>glossy, they look incredible, and seem to sit in the resin very nicely
    > >>>(no metamerism or bronzing).
    > >>>
    > >>>Truth be known, I really wish I'd bought the matte inks. Most of the
    > >>>images I print look much better on matte papers, but the photo ink
    > >>>(as expected) is too light. My prints don't usually have solid white
    > >>>areas, and I'm not keen on gloss for anything larger than 5x7
    > >>>portraiture. Even premium lustre at 8x10 is pushing it for me.
    > >>>
    > >
    > >
    > >
  40. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Lokki - sounds like we have the exact same problem. Tried a fan? I really
    need to work this out or go back to Epson inks. Please keep me posted on
    your efforts.

    [I tried to email you privately but could not figure out the code. Get me
    at my first name underscore my last name at earthlink and then dot and net.]

    Alan Justice


    "lokki" <lokki@act-1-dot-net.no-spam.invalid> wrote in message
    news:d78a9$426762c9$455da0d2$25293@allthenewsgroups.com...
    > well, it's not the humidity... I live in high desert (really... nearly
    > 1.25 miles above sea level) where it's extremely dry.
    >
    > I'm having the same roller scuff issue using the Niagra system on my
    > 2200. I just tried using the exit flags, but the cart crashed into
    > the exit wheels and caused the paper to fail to feed. The result was
    > a pool of ink on one end of somewhat expensive paper.
    >
    > I did not have this problem with the Epson Ultrachrome inks on Premium
    > Luster, Premium Glossy, or Enhanced Matte (all from espon, in sizes up
    > to Super B). However, I switched to the Mediastreet system
    > and tried using Ilford Smooth Pearl
    > (13x19) and have had nothing but problems in continuous tone images.
    > Smaller 4x6 on glossy stock doesn't seem to have a problem.
    >
    > So, I can't offer anything but sympathy at this point. I hope I
    > haven't hosed my 2200 with those damned flags... any idea how to get
    > them to work properly??
    >
  41. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Hi Alan - the reply system here doesn't seem to be working, so I
    missed your post.

    I've not tried a fan, as I think I'm going to switch over to matte
    printing. Kind of a loss, because I do like to print 4x6 and 5x7
    snaps on glossy paper.

    I recently saw another vendor that seems to have a different setup.
    The display was on a 4000, and used tanks attached to the carts
    themselves. Naturally, the demo guy said he never has a problem with
    the rollers, but he's not tried it on a 2200 (read: no help there).
    However, the prints were stunning.

    I'm not sure what to do, especially since I don't seem to get the
    flags to work properly. The cart carrier appears to crash into the
    wheels, regardless of what I try when installing the flags. If I
    could get that part to work properly, I might consider making a
    'pusher' for the paper... sacrificing a sheet or two of the same
    stock and taping 3-4" on the trailing edge (Not sure how the 2200
    senses the paper). Of course, another alternative is to use rolls and
    not worry about the wheels, letting the cutter do the work. My concern
    is paper curl and whether the flags get in the way of the cutting
    head.

    I'll try and email you this week.
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