Nforce4 Raid 1

I have heard that some raid controllers in raid 1 configuration can give a read performance boost by taking some data from each of the disks in the array.

I have also heard that some raid controllers in raid 1 configuration do not give any read performance boost because they only read from one drive.

Which is the case for the raid 1 option with the Nforce 4 chipset? After some digging to find this answer I have come up with nothing.

:(
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  1. RAID1 Read performance on the nForce4 chipset is approximitely equal to single disk read performance (actually, a little less).

    Here is a good article that compares the RAID performance of the nForce4 chipset to that of Intels, and has single drive comparisons as well. The one thing it is missing is SI's SATA RAID chipsets, but I don't imagine them being much different.

    While doing alternating reads across multiple hard drives in a RAID 1 will add performance, there's also a computational overhead that has to be processed somewhere to keep those data reads in sync with each other.
  2. Good link, thanks.

    Wow. Those results are really dissapointing. It's difficult for me to understand how the raid 5 performance can be so dismal when compared to a single drive. Looks like an independent raid controller might be worth the investment.
  3. The read performance of RAID5 is quite good compared to a single drive (which makes you wonder why RAID 1 is bad cause it's the same read process that happens). However, the poor write performance is easily explained if you know how the parity and XOR calculations apply to make RAID 5 what it is. Do some google research and you'll understand.

    As for a separate controller, the only ones that'll give you comparable write performance to a single drive will run you upwards of $300 since they have specialty processors on them meant to only calculate all the parity checks that happen.
  4. Quote:
    Do some google research and you'll understand.

    no, I understand why, I was just being rhetorical. Its just, you have a nearly untaxed cpu just sitting there, knowwhatImean? Perhaps there should be options to dedicate some main memory and "up to X% cpu" to the raid operation.

    Quote:
    As for a separate controller, the only ones that'll give you comparable write performance to a single drive will run you upwards of $300 since they have specialty processors on them meant to only calculate all the parity checks that happen.

    Yeah, I had this one in mind.
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