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How to Cleaning the heat sink and..

Last response: in Overclocking
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June 28, 2006 2:42:23 AM

Well after a sudden event where my heat sink (VANTEC VP4-C7040 TMD similar to that one I couldnt find my exact model) fell off and landed on my gfx card. I couldn't find another in good condition replacement that attaches onto the MB that holds the Heatsink into place (anyone know where I could get one?), but I got one off a old board that a part of it was broken from fitting the heatsink. The Heatsink sits solid and doesnt budge and it seems to be flat on the CPU, But now after about a 4 months of usage the heatsink seems to have gathered alot of dust on it, including the fan, I suspect that this is the reason why my cpu overheats so fast from the dust insulating the heat more. (from a idle 38c to 67c on full load in hot weather.) I have been debating on using either a vacume or a compressed air can, which would be a considerable way or easier way to clean the heatsink off.

Before the heatsink fell off I had been overclocking the CPU to 3.2 ghz from 2.8 and my idle temp was around 35-38c, 45-50c full load.

Specs:
P4 socket 478 @ 2.8
ASUS P4S800 Mobo
3 Case fans, two 80mm, one 120mm.
ATI 9800 PRO with VGA cooler.
450w Themaltake PSU.

-Thanks for all of those who looked here.
Brian

More about : cleaning heat sink

June 28, 2006 3:10:05 AM

Vacs would be preferred i guess because it just doesnt blow the dust bunnies around the case. But a Can of air would be fine. Either should work.
June 28, 2006 3:29:14 AM

Hmmm well I wanted to take the heatsink off if Iwas going to dust the machine with the compressed air can. Also let it dry since sometimes the aircans can shoot out water just to be on the safe side.. Also would cleaning up any "dead" thermalpaste on the cpu help?
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June 28, 2006 3:37:23 AM

I've used a handvac in the past. Always was careful not to actually touch any components. Due remember not to have the pc on. For that matter, it might be best to unplug it from the wall. Don't want any stray electrical currents wandering around.
June 28, 2006 3:51:54 AM

XD Turning off the computer is a no brainer. Hmm Ill try the vacume idea probably sometime tmr, except with using one of the actualy carpet vacumes using the hose. Does anyone know where to get the bracket thing that the heatsink attaches to? I need a new one this might also improve my thermal problem.
June 28, 2006 1:46:32 PM

If the whole bracket is broken, i would just pick up a new heatsink.. I've always been a pratical underbudget builder so i wont recommend 1 (perhaps sum1 else will), but i would go with 1 that comes with a "unique" installation process. Those will give you a custom bracket designed specifically for that heatsink u bought. That will most likely bring your temps down and solve your bracket issue. And yes, go with Artic Silver 5. Make sure you clean the old thermal paste off hte old chip first (and heatsink if you plan on reusing it). old/dried thermal paste act more like a insulator than a conductor of heat.
June 28, 2006 2:08:09 PM

I think he's asking how to clean the old thermal paste off the heatsink. Use isopropyl alcohol (witch hazel) on both the heatsink and CPU, apply Arctic Silver or w/e thermal paste (AS5 recommended), then reattach the HSF.

And use compressed air to get the dust out of your case.
June 28, 2006 2:34:01 PM

Ya, that's what the subject says, but if you read further down:

Quote:
XD Turning off the computer is a no brainer. Hmm Ill try the vacume idea probably sometime tmr, except with using one of the actualy carpet vacumes using the hose. Does anyone know where to get the bracket thing that the heatsink attaches to? I need a new one this might also improve my thermal problem.


That was why I said Froggle it. :D 

But I do agree with your advice, since he will end up taking everything part, and will need to clean off the thermo compound.
June 28, 2006 3:05:05 PM

A bone of contention tho -- avoid compressed air unless you have nothing else. It merely blows the dust around and wedges it under/ into components. Not to mention that some of the liquid "air" can cause... well, "bad things" to happen.

A vacuum actually removes it from the system. Not just any vacuum, use a static safe vacuum, like this:

http://www.mpsupplies.com/3mvacuum.html

...and yes, they run about $230. But many people waste that on a l33t video card for their "extreme" gaming lifestyle. lol
June 28, 2006 3:35:44 PM

Take the heatsink outta of system take it outside and use the canned air on it.If needed use q-tips to clean it more, and i would re-apply the thermal paste.Everclear works well, also like goo-off will work well, goo-off will actually lift the paste not just smear it around. Just remeber to get any of the residue off of it. anyway hf
June 28, 2006 4:08:53 PM

Quote:
A bone of contention tho -- avoid compressed air unless you have nothing else. It merely blows the dust around and wedges it under/ into components. Not to mention that some of the liquid "air" can cause... well, "bad things" to happen.

A vacuum actually removes it from the system. Not just any vacuum, use a static safe vacuum, like this:

http://www.mpsupplies.com/3mvacuum.html

...and yes, they run about $230. But many people waste that on a l33t video card for their "extreme" gaming lifestyle. lol


Hmm.. if often wondered if it would be possible to hold the vacume by the heatsink, and at thre same time use the high preasure air duster to blast the dust off. The debris + water vapors and residues srayed out by thr can would be instantly safely disposed of
June 28, 2006 5:37:53 PM

Quote:
XD Turning off the computer is a no brainer. Hmm Ill try the vacume idea probably sometime tmr, except with using one of the actualy carpet vacumes using the hose..


It might seem like a no brainer, but I've seem people do a lot of things that should be no brainers. I've learned its better to state a no brainer when advising, because someone, somewhere, will do something totally dumb if given the chance.
June 28, 2006 6:20:02 PM

I've actually run heat sinks through the dishwasher before (without the fan, of course). Clean as new, pop it back on.

And the stuff coming out of the canned "air" isn't water, of course.
!