Home folder not mapping

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.active_directory (More info?)

After a user upgrades to XP SP2 and reboots all scripts run except for the
one set up in their user properties/profile in active directory users and
computers.
Their home folder profile is: H: \\servername\home\%username%

We recently upgraded our switches to 10/100/1000. The problem has been worse
since then.

I did find an article that suggests creating a Group Policy network timeout
policy.
I could not find where to create in any group policy settings.
Do I edit the registry on the DC?
the suggested edit is:
Creating a Group Policy network start timeout policy
The GpNetworkStartTimeoutPolicyValue policy timeout can be specified in the
registry in two locations:• HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows
NT\Current Version\Winlogon
• HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\System
You can do this by adding a DWORD value of GpNetworkStartTimeoutPolicyValue
with a number of seconds between 30 and 600.

If Windows finds the timeout value specified in both registry locations, the
value that is stored at
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\System will take
precedence. Additionally, the value that is stored at that location may have
been pushed there from your Group Policy server after an initial connection
was established.

The value at HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\Current
Version\Winlogon is useful to specify the timeout for the first connection,
whereas the value that is downloaded from the Group Policy server at
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\System is used for all
subsequent connections , if it is supplied.

The value specified should be of sufficient duration to make sure that the
connection is made. During the timeout period, Windows examines the
connection status every two seconds and continues with system startup as soon
as the connection is confirmed. Therefore, setting the value larger than the
minimum value of 30 is recommended. However, be advised that if the system is
legitimately disconnected, Windows will stall for the whole timeout period.

thanks
6 answers Last reply
More about home folder mapping
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.active_directory (More info?)

    KatZ,

    Its sounds like you are grasping at straws a bit here. Moving to
    10/100/1000 switches doesn't often cause problems (I'll mention this later)
    nor does timeouts on the GPOs, except in exceptional instances.

    Things to report back on:
    1. Does the home drive ever map? Is it intermittent? On specific machines?
    2. Can you map the home drive manually with 'net use h: \\uncpath /home'
    3. Do users have file AND share permissions? ownership?
    4. Are you using DFS on your home drives?
    5. Can you post your scripts?
    6. Can users get to their home drives via UNC?

    Things to try:
    1. Make sure your users have permissions.
    2. Make sure you have hard coded the speed and duplex settings on any switch
    port connecting to a server, switch, or router. (Including trunk ports)
    3. Hardcode speed and duplex on your servers
    4. Start a log to look for patterns if it is intermittent.
    5. Make sure you are not doing a net use * /delete or killing the Z: mapping
    in your script.

    --
    Ryan Hanisco
    MCSE, MCDBA
    Flagship Integration Services

    "KatZ" <KatZ@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:531ACB47-96F3-4BF6-AA7A-F561B68E3A15@microsoft.com...
    > After a user upgrades to XP SP2 and reboots all scripts run except for the
    > one set up in their user properties/profile in active directory users and
    > computers.
    > Their home folder profile is: H: \\servername\home\%username%
    >
    > We recently upgraded our switches to 10/100/1000. The problem has been
    worse
    > since then.
    >
    > I did find an article that suggests creating a Group Policy network
    timeout
    > policy.
    > I could not find where to create in any group policy settings.
    > Do I edit the registry on the DC?
    > the suggested edit is:
    > Creating a Group Policy network start timeout policy
    > The GpNetworkStartTimeoutPolicyValue policy timeout can be specified in
    the
    > registry in two locations:. HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows
    > NT\Current Version\Winlogon
    > . HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\System
    > You can do this by adding a DWORD value of
    GpNetworkStartTimeoutPolicyValue
    > with a number of seconds between 30 and 600.
    >
    > If Windows finds the timeout value specified in both registry locations,
    the
    > value that is stored at
    > HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\System will take
    > precedence. Additionally, the value that is stored at that location may
    have
    > been pushed there from your Group Policy server after an initial
    connection
    > was established.
    >
    > The value at HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\Current
    > Version\Winlogon is useful to specify the timeout for the first
    connection,
    > whereas the value that is downloaded from the Group Policy server at
    > HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\System is used for
    all
    > subsequent connections , if it is supplied.
    >
    > The value specified should be of sufficient duration to make sure that the
    > connection is made. During the timeout period, Windows examines the
    > connection status every two seconds and continues with system startup as
    soon
    > as the connection is confirmed. Therefore, setting the value larger than
    the
    > minimum value of 30 is recommended. However, be advised that if the system
    is
    > legitimately disconnected, Windows will stall for the whole timeout
    period.
    >
    > thanks
    >
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.active_directory (More info?)

    Things to report back on:
    1. Does the home drive ever map? Yes, successfully everytime for two years
    until the Monday following our Gigabyte switch upgrade, in addition all users
    that are experiencing this problem also recently auto updated via sus to SP2.

    Is it intermittent? yes,
    On specific machines? yes.
    event iD
    Notes:

    Event ID on Computers

    1054: Windows cannot obtain the domain controller name for your computer
    network. (The specified domain either does not exist or could not be
    contacted. ). Group Policy processing aborted.

    1000: Could not execute the following script OPs.BAT. The system cannot find
    the file specified.


    2. Can you map the home drive manually with 'net use h: \\uncpath /home'
    yes
    3. Do users have file AND share permissions? ownership? ownership to their
    home folders.
    4. Are you using DFS on your home drives? no
    5. Can you post your scripts?
    NET USE H: \\TULIP\HOME\%username%
    NET USE L: \\OLYMPIA\APPS\
    NET USE M: \\olympia\data
    NET USE O: \\TULIP\SHARED
    NET USE R: \\LARRY\DATA
    NET USE T: \\TULIP\DATA

    6. Can users get to their home drives via UNC? YES
    Things to try: will do. Thanks
    1. Make sure your users have permissions. They do.
    2. Make sure you have hard coded the speed and duplex settings on any switch
    port connecting to a server, switch, or router. (Including trunk ports)
    3. Hardcode speed and duplex on your servers
    4. Start a log to look for patterns if it is intermittent.
    5. Make sure you are not doing a net use * /delete or killing the Z: mapping
    in your script.


    "Ryan Hanisco" wrote:

    > KatZ,
    >
    > Its sounds like you are grasping at straws a bit here. Moving to
    > 10/100/1000 switches doesn't often cause problems (I'll mention this later)
    > nor does timeouts on the GPOs, except in exceptional instances.
    >
    > Things to report back on:
    > 1. Does the home drive ever map? Is it intermittent? On specific machines?
    > 2. Can you map the home drive manually with 'net use h: \\uncpath /home'
    > 3. Do users have file AND share permissions? ownership?
    > 4. Are you using DFS on your home drives?
    > 5. Can you post your scripts?
    > 6. Can users get to their home drives via UNC?
    >
    > Things to try:
    > 1. Make sure your users have permissions.
    > 2. Make sure you have hard coded the speed and duplex settings on any switch
    > port connecting to a server, switch, or router. (Including trunk ports)
    > 3. Hardcode speed and duplex on your servers
    > 4. Start a log to look for patterns if it is intermittent.
    > 5. Make sure you are not doing a net use * /delete or killing the Z: mapping
    > in your script.
    >
    > --
    > Ryan Hanisco
    > MCSE, MCDBA
    > Flagship Integration Services
    >
    > "KatZ" <KatZ@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > news:531ACB47-96F3-4BF6-AA7A-F561B68E3A15@microsoft.com...
    > > After a user upgrades to XP SP2 and reboots all scripts run except for the
    > > one set up in their user properties/profile in active directory users and
    > > computers.
    > > Their home folder profile is: H: \\servername\home\%username%
    > >
    > > We recently upgraded our switches to 10/100/1000. The problem has been
    > worse
    > > since then.
    > >
    > > I did find an article that suggests creating a Group Policy network
    > timeout
    > > policy.
    > > I could not find where to create in any group policy settings.
    > > Do I edit the registry on the DC?
    > > the suggested edit is:
    > > Creating a Group Policy network start timeout policy
    > > The GpNetworkStartTimeoutPolicyValue policy timeout can be specified in
    > the
    > > registry in two locations:. HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows
    > > NT\Current Version\Winlogon
    > > . HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\System
    > > You can do this by adding a DWORD value of
    > GpNetworkStartTimeoutPolicyValue
    > > with a number of seconds between 30 and 600.
    > >
    > > If Windows finds the timeout value specified in both registry locations,
    > the
    > > value that is stored at
    > > HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\System will take
    > > precedence. Additionally, the value that is stored at that location may
    > have
    > > been pushed there from your Group Policy server after an initial
    > connection
    > > was established.
    > >
    > > The value at HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\Current
    > > Version\Winlogon is useful to specify the timeout for the first
    > connection,
    > > whereas the value that is downloaded from the Group Policy server at
    > > HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\System is used for
    > all
    > > subsequent connections , if it is supplied.
    > >
    > > The value specified should be of sufficient duration to make sure that the
    > > connection is made. During the timeout period, Windows examines the
    > > connection status every two seconds and continues with system startup as
    > soon
    > > as the connection is confirmed. Therefore, setting the value larger than
    > the
    > > minimum value of 30 is recommended. However, be advised that if the system
    > is
    > > legitimately disconnected, Windows will stall for the whole timeout
    > period.
    > >
    > > thanks
    > >
    >
    >
    >
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.active_directory (More info?)

    So, in a distinct subset of your workstations there is an intermittent
    problem where home drive do not map.

    This looks like a naming or network issue.
    What model of switch did you put in and what's its firmware level.?
    Are you using proxy arp?
    While you are having problems, does DNS resolve?
    Do you have the appropriate IPHelper lines traversing your subnets?
    Do you have PIM on?

    --
    Ryan Hanisco
    MCSE, MCDBA
    Flagship Integration Services

    "KatZ" <KatZ@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:EA5C3D17-032E-454F-BF1E-A3F1142A96C9@microsoft.com...
    > Things to report back on:
    > 1. Does the home drive ever map? Yes, successfully everytime for two
    years
    > until the Monday following our Gigabyte switch upgrade, in addition all
    users
    > that are experiencing this problem also recently auto updated via sus to
    SP2.
    >
    > Is it intermittent? yes,
    > On specific machines? yes.
    > event iD
    > Notes:
    >
    > Event ID on Computers
    >
    > 1054: Windows cannot obtain the domain controller name for your computer
    > network. (The specified domain either does not exist or could not be
    > contacted. ). Group Policy processing aborted.
    >
    > 1000: Could not execute the following script OPs.BAT. The system cannot
    find
    > the file specified.
    >
    >
    > 2. Can you map the home drive manually with 'net use h: \\uncpath /home'
    > yes
    > 3. Do users have file AND share permissions? ownership? ownership to
    their
    > home folders.
    > 4. Are you using DFS on your home drives? no
    > 5. Can you post your scripts?
    > NET USE H: \\TULIP\HOME\%username%
    > NET USE L: \\OLYMPIA\APPS\
    > NET USE M: \\olympia\data
    > NET USE O: \\TULIP\SHARED
    > NET USE R: \\LARRY\DATA
    > NET USE T: \\TULIP\DATA
    >
    > 6. Can users get to their home drives via UNC? YES
    > Things to try: will do. Thanks
    > 1. Make sure your users have permissions. They do.
    > 2. Make sure you have hard coded the speed and duplex settings on any
    switch
    > port connecting to a server, switch, or router. (Including trunk ports)
    > 3. Hardcode speed and duplex on your servers
    > 4. Start a log to look for patterns if it is intermittent.
    > 5. Make sure you are not doing a net use * /delete or killing the Z:
    mapping
    > in your script.
    >
    >
    >
    > "Ryan Hanisco" wrote:
    >
    > > KatZ,
    > >
    > > Its sounds like you are grasping at straws a bit here. Moving to
    > > 10/100/1000 switches doesn't often cause problems (I'll mention this
    later)
    > > nor does timeouts on the GPOs, except in exceptional instances.
    > >
    > > Things to report back on:
    > > 1. Does the home drive ever map? Is it intermittent? On specific
    machines?
    > > 2. Can you map the home drive manually with 'net use h: \\uncpath /home'
    > > 3. Do users have file AND share permissions? ownership?
    > > 4. Are you using DFS on your home drives?
    > > 5. Can you post your scripts?
    > > 6. Can users get to their home drives via UNC?
    > >
    > > Things to try:
    > > 1. Make sure your users have permissions.
    > > 2. Make sure you have hard coded the speed and duplex settings on any
    switch
    > > port connecting to a server, switch, or router. (Including trunk ports)
    > > 3. Hardcode speed and duplex on your servers
    > > 4. Start a log to look for patterns if it is intermittent.
    > > 5. Make sure you are not doing a net use * /delete or killing the Z:
    mapping
    > > in your script.
    > >
    > > --
    > > Ryan Hanisco
    > > MCSE, MCDBA
    > > Flagship Integration Services
    > >
    > > "KatZ" <KatZ@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > > news:531ACB47-96F3-4BF6-AA7A-F561B68E3A15@microsoft.com...
    > > > After a user upgrades to XP SP2 and reboots all scripts run except for
    the
    > > > one set up in their user properties/profile in active directory users
    and
    > > > computers.
    > > > Their home folder profile is: H: \\servername\home\%username%
    > > >
    > > > We recently upgraded our switches to 10/100/1000. The problem has been
    > > worse
    > > > since then.
    > > >
    > > > I did find an article that suggests creating a Group Policy network
    > > timeout
    > > > policy.
    > > > I could not find where to create in any group policy settings.
    > > > Do I edit the registry on the DC?
    > > > the suggested edit is:
    > > > Creating a Group Policy network start timeout policy
    > > > The GpNetworkStartTimeoutPolicyValue policy timeout can be specified
    in
    > > the
    > > > registry in two locations:.
    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows
    > > > NT\Current Version\Winlogon
    > > > . HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\System
    > > > You can do this by adding a DWORD value of
    > > GpNetworkStartTimeoutPolicyValue
    > > > with a number of seconds between 30 and 600.
    > > >
    > > > If Windows finds the timeout value specified in both registry
    locations,
    > > the
    > > > value that is stored at
    > > > HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\System will
    take
    > > > precedence. Additionally, the value that is stored at that location
    may
    > > have
    > > > been pushed there from your Group Policy server after an initial
    > > connection
    > > > was established.
    > > >
    > > > The value at HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\Current
    > > > Version\Winlogon is useful to specify the timeout for the first
    > > connection,
    > > > whereas the value that is downloaded from the Group Policy server at
    > > > HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\System is used
    for
    > > all
    > > > subsequent connections , if it is supplied.
    > > >
    > > > The value specified should be of sufficient duration to make sure that
    the
    > > > connection is made. During the timeout period, Windows examines the
    > > > connection status every two seconds and continues with system startup
    as
    > > soon
    > > > as the connection is confirmed. Therefore, setting the value larger
    than
    > > the
    > > > minimum value of 30 is recommended. However, be advised that if the
    system
    > > is
    > > > legitimately disconnected, Windows will stall for the whole timeout
    > > period.
    > > >
    > > > thanks
    > > >
    > >
    > >
    > >
  4. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.active_directory (More info?)

    "Ryan Hanisco" wrote:
    > So, in a distinct subset of your workstations there is an
    > intermittent
    > problem where home drive do not map.
    >
    > This looks like a naming or network issue.
    > What model of switch did you put in and what's its firmware
    > level.?
    > Are you using proxy arp?
    > While you are having problems, does DNS resolve?
    > Do you have the appropriate IPHelper lines traversing your
    > subnets?
    > Do you have PIM on?
    >
    > --
    > Ryan Hanisco
    > MCSE, MCDBA
    > Flagship Integration Services
    >
    > "KatZ" <KatZ@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > news:EA5C3D17-032E-454F-BF1E-A3F1142A96C9@microsoft.com...
    > > Things to report back on:
    > > 1. Does the home drive ever map? Yes, successfully
    > everytime for two
    > years
    > > until the Monday following our Gigabyte switch upgrade, in
    > addition all
    > users
    > > that are experiencing this problem also recently auto
    > updated via sus to
    > SP2.
    > >
    > > Is it intermittent? yes,
    > > On specific machines? yes.
    > > event iD
    > > Notes:
    > >
    > > Event ID on Computers
    > >
    > > 1054: Windows cannot obtain the domain controller name for
    > your computer
    > > network. (The specified domain either does not exist or
    > could not be
    > > contacted. ). Group Policy processing aborted.
    > >
    > > 1000: Could not execute the following script OPs.BAT. The
    > system cannot
    > find
    > > the file specified.
    > >
    > >
    > > 2. Can you map the home drive manually with 'net use h:
    > \uncpath /home'
    > > yes
    > > 3. Do users have file AND share permissions? ownership?
    > ownership to
    > their
    > > home folders.
    > > 4. Are you using DFS on your home drives? no
    > > 5. Can you post your scripts?
    > > NET USE H: \TULIPHOME%username%
    > > NET USE L: \OLYMPIAAPPS
    > > NET USE M: \olympiadata
    > > NET USE O: \TULIPSHARED
    > > NET USE R: \LARRYDATA
    > > NET USE T: \TULIPDATA
    > >
    > > 6. Can users get to their home drives via UNC? YES
    > > Things to try: will do. Thanks
    > > 1. Make sure your users have permissions. They do.
    > > 2. Make sure you have hard coded the speed and duplex
    > settings on any
    > switch
    > > port connecting to a server, switch, or router. (Including
    > trunk ports)
    > > 3. Hardcode speed and duplex on your servers
    > > 4. Start a log to look for patterns if it is intermittent.
    > > 5. Make sure you are not doing a net use * /delete or
    > killing the Z:
    > mapping
    > > in your script.
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > "Ryan Hanisco" wrote:
    > >
    >  > > KatZ,
    >  > >
    >  > > Its sounds like you are grasping at straws a bit
    > here. Moving to
    >  > > 10/100/1000 switches doesn't often cause problems
    > (I'll mention this
    > later)
    >  > > nor does timeouts on the GPOs, except in exceptional
    > instances.
    >  > >
    >  > > Things to report back on:
    >  > > 1. Does the home drive ever map? Is it intermittent?
    > On specific
    > machines?
    >  > > 2. Can you map the home drive manually with 'net use
    > h: \uncpath /home'
    >  > > 3. Do users have file AND share permissions?
    > ownership?
    >  > > 4. Are you using DFS on your home drives?
    >  > > 5. Can you post your scripts?
    >  > > 6. Can users get to their home drives via UNC?
    >  > >
    >  > > Things to try:
    >  > > 1. Make sure your users have permissions.
    >  > > 2. Make sure you have hard coded the speed and
    > duplex settings on any
    > switch
    >  > > port connecting to a server, switch, or router.
    > (Including trunk ports)
    >  > > 3. Hardcode speed and duplex on your servers
    >  > > 4. Start a log to look for patterns if it is
    > intermittent.
    >  > > 5. Make sure you are not doing a net use * /delete
    > or killing the Z:
    > mapping
    >  > > in your script.
    >  > >
    >  > > --
    >  > > Ryan Hanisco
    >  > > MCSE, MCDBA
    >  > > Flagship Integration Services
    >  > >
    >  > > "KatZ" <KatZ@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote
    > in message
    >  > >
    > news:531ACB47-96F3-4BF6-AA7A-F561B68E3A15@microsoft.com...
    >   > > > After a user upgrades to XP SP2 and reboots
    > all scripts run except for
    > the
    >   > > > one set up in their user properties/profile
    > in active directory users
    > and
    >   > > > computers.
    >   > > > Their home folder profile is: H:
    > \servernamehome%username%
    >   > > >
    >   > > > We recently upgraded our switches to
    > 10/100/1000. The problem has been
    >  > > worse
    >   > > > since then.
    >   > > >
    >   > > > I did find an article that suggests creating
    > a Group Policy network
    >  > > timeout
    >   > > > policy.
    >   > > > I could not find where to create in any
    > group policy settings.
    >   > > > Do I edit the registry on the DC?
    >   > > > the suggested edit is:
    >   > > > Creating a Group Policy network start
    > timeout policy
    >   > > > The GpNetworkStartTimeoutPolicyValue policy
    > timeout can be specified
    > in
    >  > > the
    >   > > > registry in two locations:.
    > HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESOFTWAREMicrosoftWindows
    >   > > > NTCurrent VersionWinlogon
    >   > > > .
    > HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESOFTWAREPoliciesMicrosoftWindowsSystem
    >   > > > You can do this by adding a DWORD value of
    >  > > GpNetworkStartTimeoutPolicyValue
    >   > > > with a number of seconds between 30 and 600.
    >   > > >
    >   > > > If Windows finds the timeout value specified
    > in both registry
    > locations,
    >  > > the
    >   > > > value that is stored at
    >   > > >
    > HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESOFTWAREPoliciesMicrosoftWindowsSystem
    > will
    > take
    >   > > > precedence. Additionally, the value that is
    > stored at that location
    > may
    >  > > have
    >   > > > been pushed there from your Group Policy
    > server after an initial
    >  > > connection
    >   > > > was established.
    >   > > >
    >   > > > The value at
    > HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESOFTWAREMicrosoftWindows NTCurrent
    >   > > > VersionWinlogon is useful to specify the
    > timeout for the first
    >  > > connection,
    >   > > > whereas the value that is downloaded from
    > the Group Policy server at
    >   > > >
    > HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESOFTWAREPoliciesMicrosoftWindowsSystem
    > is used
    > for
    >  > > all
    >   > > > subsequent connections , if it is supplied.
    >   > > >
    >   > > > The value specified should be of sufficient
    > duration to make sure that
    > the
    >   > > > connection is made. During the timeout
    > period, Windows examines the
    >   > > > connection status every two seconds and
    > continues with system startup
    > as
    >  > > soon
    >   > > > as the connection is confirmed. Therefore,
    > setting the value larger
    > than
    >  > > the
    >   > > > minimum value of 30 is recommended. However,
    > be advised that if the
    > system
    >  > > is
    >   > > > legitimately disconnected, Windows will
    > stall for the whole timeout
    >  > > period.
    >   > > >
    >   > > > thanks
    >   > > >
    >  > >
    >  > >
    >  > >

    Hi,

    This may sound like a stupid question, but did you turn off the
    Firewall on XP? It automatically turns on with SP 2 and causes lots of
    problems.

    Cheers,

    Lara

    --
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  5. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.active_directory (More info?)

    "Ryan Hanisco" wrote:
    > So, in a distinct subset of your workstations there is an
    > intermittent
    > problem where home drive do not map.
    >
    > This looks like a naming or network issue.
    > What model of switch did you put in and what's its firmware
    > level.?
    > Are you using proxy arp?
    > While you are having problems, does DNS resolve?
    > Do you have the appropriate IPHelper lines traversing your
    > subnets?
    > Do you have PIM on?
    >
    > --
    > Ryan Hanisco
    > MCSE, MCDBA
    > Flagship Integration Services
    >
    > "KatZ" <KatZ@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > news:EA5C3D17-032E-454F-BF1E-A3F1142A96C9@microsoft.com...
    > > Things to report back on:
    > > 1. Does the home drive ever map? Yes, successfully
    > everytime for two
    > years
    > > until the Monday following our Gigabyte switch upgrade, in
    > addition all
    > users
    > > that are experiencing this problem also recently auto
    > updated via sus to
    > SP2.
    > >
    > > Is it intermittent? yes,
    > > On specific machines? yes.
    > > event iD
    > > Notes:
    > >
    > > Event ID on Computers
    > >
    > > 1054: Windows cannot obtain the domain controller name for
    > your computer
    > > network. (The specified domain either does not exist or
    > could not be
    > > contacted. ). Group Policy processing aborted.
    > >
    > > 1000: Could not execute the following script OPs.BAT. The
    > system cannot
    > find
    > > the file specified.
    > >
    > >
    > > 2. Can you map the home drive manually with 'net use h:
    > \uncpath /home'
    > > yes
    > > 3. Do users have file AND share permissions? ownership?
    > ownership to
    > their
    > > home folders.
    > > 4. Are you using DFS on your home drives? no
    > > 5. Can you post your scripts?
    > > NET USE H: \TULIPHOME%username%
    > > NET USE L: \OLYMPIAAPPS
    > > NET USE M: \olympiadata
    > > NET USE O: \TULIPSHARED
    > > NET USE R: \LARRYDATA
    > > NET USE T: \TULIPDATA
    > >
    > > 6. Can users get to their home drives via UNC? YES
    > > Things to try: will do. Thanks
    > > 1. Make sure your users have permissions. They do.
    > > 2. Make sure you have hard coded the speed and duplex
    > settings on any
    > switch
    > > port connecting to a server, switch, or router. (Including
    > trunk ports)
    > > 3. Hardcode speed and duplex on your servers
    > > 4. Start a log to look for patterns if it is intermittent.
    > > 5. Make sure you are not doing a net use * /delete or
    > killing the Z:
    > mapping
    > > in your script.
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > "Ryan Hanisco" wrote:
    > >
    >  > > KatZ,
    >  > >
    >  > > Its sounds like you are grasping at straws a bit
    > here. Moving to
    >  > > 10/100/1000 switches doesn't often cause problems
    > (I'll mention this
    > later)
    >  > > nor does timeouts on the GPOs, except in exceptional
    > instances.
    >  > >
    >  > > Things to report back on:
    >  > > 1. Does the home drive ever map? Is it intermittent?
    > On specific
    > machines?
    >  > > 2. Can you map the home drive manually with 'net use
    > h: \uncpath /home'
    >  > > 3. Do users have file AND share permissions?
    > ownership?
    >  > > 4. Are you using DFS on your home drives?
    >  > > 5. Can you post your scripts?
    >  > > 6. Can users get to their home drives via UNC?
    >  > >
    >  > > Things to try:
    >  > > 1. Make sure your users have permissions.
    >  > > 2. Make sure you have hard coded the speed and
    > duplex settings on any
    > switch
    >  > > port connecting to a server, switch, or router.
    > (Including trunk ports)
    >  > > 3. Hardcode speed and duplex on your servers
    >  > > 4. Start a log to look for patterns if it is
    > intermittent.
    >  > > 5. Make sure you are not doing a net use * /delete
    > or killing the Z:
    > mapping
    >  > > in your script.
    >  > >
    >  > > --
    >  > > Ryan Hanisco
    >  > > MCSE, MCDBA
    >  > > Flagship Integration Services
    >  > >
    >  > > "KatZ" <KatZ@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote
    > in message
    >  > >
    > news:531ACB47-96F3-4BF6-AA7A-F561B68E3A15@microsoft.com...
    >   > > > After a user upgrades to XP SP2 and reboots
    > all scripts run except for
    > the
    >   > > > one set up in their user properties/profile
    > in active directory users
    > and
    >   > > > computers.
    >   > > > Their home folder profile is: H:
    > \servernamehome%username%
    >   > > >
    >   > > > We recently upgraded our switches to
    > 10/100/1000. The problem has been
    >  > > worse
    >   > > > since then.
    >   > > >
    >   > > > I did find an article that suggests creating
    > a Group Policy network
    >  > > timeout
    >   > > > policy.
    >   > > > I could not find where to create in any
    > group policy settings.
    >   > > > Do I edit the registry on the DC?
    >   > > > the suggested edit is:
    >   > > > Creating a Group Policy network start
    > timeout policy
    >   > > > The GpNetworkStartTimeoutPolicyValue policy
    > timeout can be specified
    > in
    >  > > the
    >   > > > registry in two locations:.
    > HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESOFTWAREMicrosoftWindows
    >   > > > NTCurrent VersionWinlogon
    >   > > > .
    > HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESOFTWAREPoliciesMicrosoftWindowsSystem
    >   > > > You can do this by adding a DWORD value of
    >  > > GpNetworkStartTimeoutPolicyValue
    >   > > > with a number of seconds between 30 and 600.
    >   > > >
    >   > > > If Windows finds the timeout value specified
    > in both registry
    > locations,
    >  > > the
    >   > > > value that is stored at
    >   > > >
    > HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESOFTWAREPoliciesMicrosoftWindowsSystem
    > will
    > take
    >   > > > precedence. Additionally, the value that is
    > stored at that location
    > may
    >  > > have
    >   > > > been pushed there from your Group Policy
    > server after an initial
    >  > > connection
    >   > > > was established.
    >   > > >
    >   > > > The value at
    > HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESOFTWAREMicrosoftWindows NTCurrent
    >   > > > VersionWinlogon is useful to specify the
    > timeout for the first
    >  > > connection,
    >   > > > whereas the value that is downloaded from
    > the Group Policy server at
    >   > > >
    > HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESOFTWAREPoliciesMicrosoftWindowsSystem
    > is used
    > for
    >  > > all
    >   > > > subsequent connections , if it is supplied.
    >   > > >
    >   > > > The value specified should be of sufficient
    > duration to make sure that
    > the
    >   > > > connection is made. During the timeout
    > period, Windows examines the
    >   > > > connection status every two seconds and
    > continues with system startup
    > as
    >  > > soon
    >   > > > as the connection is confirmed. Therefore,
    > setting the value larger
    > than
    >  > > the
    >   > > > minimum value of 30 is recommended. However,
    > be advised that if the
    > system
    >  > > is
    >   > > > legitimately disconnected, Windows will
    > stall for the whole timeout
    >  > > period.
    >   > > >
    >   > > > thanks
    >   > > >
    >  > >
    >  > >
    >  > >

    Hi,

    This may sound like a stupid question, but did you turn off the
    Firewall on XP? It automatically turns on with SP 2 and causes lots of
    problems.

    Cheers,

    Lara
  6. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.active_directory (More info?)

    Hi there,

    replacing the switches might have an impact, if those switches have the
    'port fast' setting disabled.
    To avoid trouble between switches, the port is checked ,upon connecting
    to it, to make sure there aren't any loops, especially if you have
    spanning tree enabled.
    That operation may require some time (very relative of course) and
    cause a timeout on the logon process, thus avoiding the proper
    connection of a session. You could try and disable either 'spanning
    tree' or, if you're sure you haven't got any loops anyway, by enabling
    'port fast' setting. I have no experience with your brand of switches,
    but for the popular cisco 3500 series, this certainly applies,
    particularly if the pc connecting is equipped with a 3com XL or EL
    network card.
    There may be other reasons or solutions to the problem your describe,
    but this might be one of them.

    Good luck,

    Paul


    --
    paul vdb
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