Setting up Windows Server / Active Directory / DNS for sma..

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.active_directory,microsoft.public.win2000.dns (More info?)

Hi all,

I am a part-time system administrator for a small business that currently
has a Windows NT domain with approximately 10 workstations. I recently
purchased a new server computer that has windows 2003 server pre-installed.
I haven't even taken it out of the box yet because I am currently "studying"
Windows Server 2003, Active directory, and DNS, as this is the first time
I've had a chance to work with them. I'm thinking it would be much better
to design and implement the "new" network correctly using best practices
rather than just guessing what the appropriate solution would be. I've done
some searching but haven't found anything particularly useful describing
best practices for a small business in our situation, which I can't believe
is that unique.

I will describe the current setup and am looking for some input on what the
new setup should look like. Since it is a small business with very few
users, I'm not planning on "migrating" the NT 4.0 domain server to windows
2003, I'm planning on basically configuring the win2003 server as a new
domain and then having all the workstations join the new domain. Any files
(such as users' saved documents on the old NT server will either be burned
to CDs or temporarily moved to one of the workstations, and then eventually
moved to the new server once it is online. I'll just create the 10 or so
user accounts on the new server.

Current setup:
- 1 Windows NT 4.0 Server (PDC) used primarily as a File/Print server
- The current NT domain name is SUNRAY
- 10 workstations running Windows XP Professional
- Internet connection via DSL using a static IP address
- The DSL router has a built in firewall and also acts as a DHCP server and
DNS server
- All workstations in the network are configured to request an IP address
via DHCP, an internal IP address range is used
- The NT Server has a hard coded internal IP address
- Outsourced email and web hosting, the public domain for the web site and
email is SUNRAYVT.COM

Possible new setup:
- 1 Windows 2003 Server used primarily as a File/Print server
- It will also be the new DHCP server, and DNS server
- Since it is a small network, we'll use 1 active directory
domain/site/tree/forest.
- 10 workstations running Windows XP Professional
- Internet connection via DSL using a static IP address
- Continue to use outsourced email and web hosting
- 1 employee will need to work remotely, so terminal services and/or VPN
will need to be supported

Its possible that sometime in the future we may decide to host our own
website and email, ideally it shouldn't require a network redesign to
accommodate that.

My biggest questions are about the domain structure and what the domain
should be called.

Should the new domain name be called SUNRAYVT.COM or SUNRAY.SUNRAYVT.COM?
Or should we register a completely new public domain name? Even though we
own the sunrayvt.com public domain, it is being used by the ISP that we
chose to host the website and email, so I'm not sure if it can also be used
by us for our windows domain.

If we did use sunrayvt.com, I'm assuming the workstations would be named
something like workstation1.sunrayvt.com, workstation2.sunrayvt.com, etc.
From a workstation on our network, how would we be able to get to
www.sunrayvt.com, since its not actually a computer in our network? Is
there some sort of DNS setup that I would need to do to tell traffic for
www.sunrayvt.com to go to a certain external IP address?

Any input you can provide regarding my questions or other setup tips for
small businesses would be appreciated. Please also let me know if you know
of any resources for setting up windows 2003 in a small business
environment.

Thanks!

-Peter
3 answers Last reply
More about setting windows server active directory
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.active_directory,microsoft.public.win2000.dns (More info?)

    In news:lG0Ad.22858$Ff3.5395@trndny04,
    Peter <p.allaire2@NOSPAMverizon.net> commented
    Then Kevin replied below:
    > Hi all,
    >
    > I am a part-time system administrator for a small
    > business that currently has a Windows NT domain with
    > approximately 10 workstations. I recently purchased a
    > new server computer that has windows 2003 server
    > pre-installed. I haven't even taken it out of the box yet
    > because I am currently "studying" Windows Server 2003,
    > Active directory, and DNS, as this is the first time I've
    > had a chance to work with them. I'm thinking it would be
    > much better to design and implement the "new" network
    > correctly using best practices rather than just guessing
    > what the appropriate solution would be. I've done some
    > searching but haven't found anything particularly useful
    > describing best practices for a small business in our
    > situation, which I can't believe is that unique.
    >
    > I will describe the current setup and am looking for some
    > input on what the new setup should look like. Since it
    > is a small business with very few users, I'm not planning
    > on "migrating" the NT 4.0 domain server to windows 2003,
    > I'm planning on basically configuring the win2003 server
    > as a new domain and then having all the workstations join
    > the new domain. Any files (such as users' saved
    > documents on the old NT server will either be burned to
    > CDs or temporarily moved to one of the workstations, and
    > then eventually moved to the new server once it is
    > online. I'll just create the 10 or so user accounts on
    > the new server.
    >
    > Current setup:
    > - 1 Windows NT 4.0 Server (PDC) used primarily as a
    > File/Print server
    > - The current NT domain name is SUNRAY
    > - 10 workstations running Windows XP Professional
    > - Internet connection via DSL using a static IP address
    > - The DSL router has a built in firewall and also acts
    > as a DHCP server and DNS server
    > - All workstations in the network are configured to
    > request an IP address via DHCP, an internal IP address
    > range is used
    > - The NT Server has a hard coded internal IP address
    > - Outsourced email and web hosting, the public domain
    > for the web site and email is SUNRAYVT.COM
    >
    > Possible new setup:
    > - 1 Windows 2003 Server used primarily as a File/Print
    > server
    > - It will also be the new DHCP server, and DNS server
    > - Since it is a small network, we'll use 1 active
    > directory domain/site/tree/forest.
    > - 10 workstations running Windows XP Professional
    > - Internet connection via DSL using a static IP address
    > - Continue to use outsourced email and web hosting
    > - 1 employee will need to work remotely, so terminal
    > services and/or VPN will need to be supported
    >
    > Its possible that sometime in the future we may decide to
    > host our own website and email, ideally it shouldn't
    > require a network redesign to accommodate that.
    >
    > My biggest questions are about the domain structure and
    > what the domain should be called.
    >
    > Should the new domain name be called SUNRAYVT.COM or
    > SUNRAY.SUNRAYVT.COM? Or should we register a completely
    > new public domain name? Even though we own the
    > sunrayvt.com public domain, it is being used by the ISP
    > that we chose to host the website and email, so I'm not
    > sure if it can also be used by us for our windows domain.
    >
    > If we did use sunrayvt.com, I'm assuming the workstations
    > would be named something like workstation1.sunrayvt.com,
    > workstation2.sunrayvt.com, etc. From a workstation on our
    > network, how would we be able to get to www.sunrayvt.com,
    > since its not actually a computer in our network? Is
    > there some sort of DNS setup that I would need to do to
    > tell traffic for www.sunrayvt.com to go to a certain
    > external IP address?
    >
    > Any input you can provide regarding my questions or other
    > setup tips for small businesses would be appreciated.
    > Please also let me know if you know of any resources for
    > setting up windows 2003 in a small business environment.
    >
    > Thanks!
    >
    > -Peter

    Since you are going to have at least one VPN user, I highly recommend using
    the third level name sunray.sunrayvt.com this will become apparent once it
    is set up. You should aso create a delegation named 'sunray' in the public
    'sunrayvt.com' zone, this delegation should point to the internal IP of the
    sunray.sunrayvt.com DNS server. This way when the VPN is connected DNS
    resolution for the VPN client will be seamless. Without this delegation the
    VPN client will have problems resolving internal names because the VPN
    client will have a view of both internal and external namespaces.

    Integrating Your Active Directory Namespace Into an Existing DNS
    Infrastructure Without Name Overlap:
    http://www.microsoft.com/windows2000/techinfo/reskit/deploymentscenarios/scenarios/dns_int_adns_to_dns_inf_wo_olap.asp
    Verification of SJC-SP-DNS-01.supplier01-int.com:
    http://www.microsoft.com/windows2000/techinfo/reskit/deploymentscenarios/scenarios/dns_vfy_sjcspdns01_01ic.asp

    --
    Best regards,
    Kevin D4 Dad Goodknecht Sr. [MVP]
    Hope This Helps
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  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.active_directory,microsoft.public.win2000.dns (More info?)

    On Mon, 27 Dec 2004 23:13:21 GMT, "Peter"
    <p.allaire2@NOSPAMverizon.net> wrote:

    >Current setup:
    > - 1 Windows NT 4.0 Server (PDC) used primarily as a File/Print server
    > - The current NT domain name is SUNRAY
    > - 10 workstations running Windows XP Professional
    > - Internet connection via DSL using a static IP address
    > - The DSL router has a built in firewall and also acts as a DHCP server and
    >DNS server
    > - All workstations in the network are configured to request an IP address
    >via DHCP, an internal IP address range is used
    > - The NT Server has a hard coded internal IP address
    > - Outsourced email and web hosting, the public domain for the web site and
    >email is SUNRAYVT.COM
    >
    >Possible new setup:
    > - 1 Windows 2003 Server used primarily as a File/Print server
    > - It will also be the new DHCP server, and DNS server
    > - Since it is a small network, we'll use 1 active directory
    >domain/site/tree/forest.
    > - 10 workstations running Windows XP Professional
    > - Internet connection via DSL using a static IP address
    > - Continue to use outsourced email and web hosting
    > - 1 employee will need to work remotely, so terminal services and/or VPN
    >will need to be supported
    >
    >Its possible that sometime in the future we may decide to host our own
    >website and email, ideally it shouldn't require a network redesign to
    >accommodate that.
    >
    >My biggest questions are about the domain structure and what the domain
    >should be called.
    >
    >Should the new domain name be called SUNRAYVT.COM or SUNRAY.SUNRAYVT.COM?

    Neither.

    >Or should we register a completely new public domain name? Even though we
    >own the sunrayvt.com public domain, it is being used by the ISP that we
    >chose to host the website and email, so I'm not sure if it can also be used
    >by us for our windows domain.

    Pick a new domain name for internal use only. SUNRAYVT.LAN or
    SUNRAYVT.LOCAL for example. Svaes a lot of headaches with a split
    horizon DNS later.

    >If we did use sunrayvt.com, I'm assuming the workstations would be named
    >something like workstation1.sunrayvt.com, workstation2.sunrayvt.com, etc.

    Name systems whatever you wish. If Workstation1, Workstation2, etc.
    work for you then fine. It can be tough to figure out when your
    network grows, rather than Sales1, Receptionist1, etc.

    >From a workstation on our network, how would we be able to get to
    >www.sunrayvt.com, since its not actually a computer in our network?

    That's one reason you won't use your public domain name for your
    internal domain name.

    >Is
    >there some sort of DNS setup that I would need to do to tell traffic for
    >www.sunrayvt.com to go to a certain external IP address?

    Yes, but again, don't do this.

    >Any input you can provide regarding my questions or other setup tips for
    >small businesses would be appreciated. Please also let me know if you know
    >of any resources for setting up windows 2003 in a small business
    >environment.

    The big resources are all at Microsoft.com. You may want to use SBS
    2003 to handle this setup.

    Jeff
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.active_directory,microsoft.public.win2000.dns (More info?)

    On Mon, 27 Dec 2004 23:13:21 GMT, "Peter"
    <p.allaire2@NOSPAMverizon.net> wrote:
    >
    >I will describe the current setup and am looking for some input on what the
    >new setup should look like. Since it is a small business with very few
    >users, I'm not planning on "migrating" the NT 4.0 domain server to windows
    >2003, I'm planning on basically configuring the win2003 server as a new
    >domain and then having all the workstations join the new domain.
    >
    That IS a migration. The other option is to *upgrade* the current
    domain to 2003.
    >
    > Any files
    >(such as users' saved documents on the old NT server will either be burned
    >to CDs or temporarily moved to one of the workstations, and then eventually
    >moved to the new server once it is online. I'll just create the 10 or so
    >user accounts on the new server.
    >
    Sounds good.
    >
    >Current setup:
    >[snip]
    > - The DSL router has a built in firewall and also acts as a DHCP server and
    >DNS server
    >
    It would be best to stop it doing this. Use the Win2003 services
    instead.
    >
    >Possible new setup:
    > - 1 Windows 2003 Server used primarily as a File/Print server
    > - It will also be the new DHCP server, and DNS server
    >
    Ah, good.
    >
    >Its possible that sometime in the future we may decide to host our own
    >website and email, ideally it shouldn't require a network redesign to
    >accommodate that.
    >
    The router may be able to support a DMZ setup, where the Web server is
    effectively on a seperate network to the LAN. I'd investigate that. If
    not, I'd look for a device that *will* allow it. You *could* punch a
    hole in the firewall and have the web server on the LAN, but that
    opens up a bag of worms. If you can't keep the web server separate
    from the LAN, you could get it hosted elsewhere are still maintain it
    and have complete control. Check you local (and remote!) service
    providers.

    For the email, you will either have to punch a hole in the firewall or
    host the mail server on a DMZ. Are you sure that you want the hassle?
    You will have to configure the mail server to filter viruses and SPAM
    and genrally keep it up to date with SPAM and virus defs. It is
    potentially a lot of work.
    >
    >My biggest questions are about the domain structure and what the domain
    >should be called.
    >
    >Should the new domain name be called SUNRAYVT.COM or SUNRAY.SUNRAYVT.COM?
    >Or should we register a completely new public domain name? Even though we
    >own the sunrayvt.com public domain, it is being used by the ISP that we
    >chose to host the website and email, so I'm not sure if it can also be used
    >by us for our windows domain.
    >
    >If we did use sunrayvt.com, I'm assuming the workstations would be named
    >something like workstation1.sunrayvt.com, workstation2.sunrayvt.com, etc.
    >From a workstation on our network, how would we be able to get to
    >www.sunrayvt.com, since its not actually a computer in our network? Is
    >there some sort of DNS setup that I would need to do to tell traffic for
    >www.sunrayvt.com to go to a certain external IP address?
    >
    There are many schools of thought on this one, and many of the debates
    flare into almost religious wars. Simple answer is to choose what
    seems to you the best way to go. I've run systems where the LAN Domain
    name was the same as a registered Domain Name, where the LAN Domain
    Name was a sub-Domain of a registered Domain Name and where the LAN
    Domain Name was a bogus Domain Name eg "cliffs.lan".

    I've not found too many operational issue with any of them. You will
    have an internal DNS and you will have an external Internet DNS to
    interact with. If the LAN Domain Name is the same as your Internet
    Domain Name, then you in essence need to set things up as follows:

    1) All clients including the DNS servers have to be configured via
    DHCP or manually to reference the DNS internal servers *only*

    2) The internal DNS servers NICs need to be configured to reference
    themselves as DNS.

    3) The gateway for *all* machines is the ADSL router.

    4) The DNS service on the DNS servers needs to be configured to
    forward all requests it doesn't know about to an external DNS, eg your
    ISPs. These are the only machines that talk to an external DNS.

    So far the applies to all AD setups. If your LAN Domain Name is the
    same as your Internet Domain Name then you have to do the following:

    5) Manually add an external machines that yuse your common Domain Name
    to DNS. eg if www.company.com exists outside the LAN and you need to
    access it from inside the LAN, add www.company.com manually to the DNS
    with its correct IP address. Since the IP address is external, packets
    to the server will go out the gateway/ADSL router to the right place.
    >
    >Any input you can provide regarding my questions or other setup tips for
    >small businesses would be appreciated. Please also let me know if you know
    >of any resources for setting up windows 2003 in a small business
    >environment.
    >
    www.microsoft.com !! <grin> Seriously that is a good place to start.
    There are also courses and books and other websites.

    Cheers,

    Cliff

    {MVP Directory Services}
    --

    The National Party manifesto can be viewed here:

    http://www.labour.org.nz/policy/index.html
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